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Warm Up Sets in 5x5

do i need to do warm up sets in the 5x5??
because at list the first set is allready very light weight…

and what about the second workout where i do 4 sets of squat and military press??? need warm up??

[quote]redivote wrote:
do i need to do warm up sets in the 5x5??
because at list the first set is allready very light weight…

and what about the second workout where i do 4 sets of squat and military press??? need warm up??
[/quote]

yes.

[quote]redivote wrote:
do i need to do warm up sets in the 5x5??
because at list the first set is allready very light weight…

and what about the second workout where i do 4 sets of squat and military press??? need warm up??
[/quote]

It depends on how you are doing all the sets. For example, if all five sets are being performed with the same weight, then you may need many warm-up sets prior to reaching your top weight for those five sets.

Example (working weight of 300lbs for 5x5):

45x5
95x5
135x5
185x3
205x3
225x2
255x1
275x1
300x5x5

If, however, you are doing the progressive method where the first set is about 50% of your top weight, the second set is about 75% of your top weight and the third, fourth and fifth sets are done with your maximum weight for five reps, then you may need little to no warm-up.

Example (top weight is 300lbs):

Set 1: 150lbs x 5
Set 2: 225lbs x 5
Set 3: 300lbs x 5
Set 4: 300lbs x 4
Set 5: 300lbs x 3

You have to find what works best for you. Even with the above, I would do a few lighter warm up sets with the bar, 95 and 135lbs.

I always need warm-up sets when using heavy weights in the bench, squat and deadlift. But I can get by with few to no warm-ups when performing overhead presses, chins and other exercises that are not as demanding or on exercises that I’m not using as much weight.

Also, I usually only need warm-ups with the first exercise. After that, I’m warmed up and can move to other exercises with my working weight.

So, if I start with heavy squats and then move on to good mornings or RDL’s, I don’t need additional warmups.

Same is true if I do heavy benches first and then move to dips, incline benches or dumbbell work.

And the other thing that matters is how heavy you really are going. If you’re new to lifting or not very strong, then you don’t usually need as many warm-ups. But as you get stronger, you’ll find that you need more warm-ups to prepare you for the heavy stuff to come.

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Are you doing still doing Madcow’s version of the Bill Starr 5x5? If so the first 4 out of the 5 sets and the first 3 out of the 4 sets on Wednesday are warmups. For example, a 5x5 squat, with 225 for the heaviest set would look like

115 x 5
145 x 5
175 x 5
200 x 5
225 x 5.

For the military press, going for 135:

75 x 5
95 x 5
115 x 5
135 x 5

Since you are squatting, benching and rowing heavy 3 times a week, 5 worksets are way too much volume. This will seem too easy at first, but if you do the program as written, after the 4th week you will be setting PRs every week, and by the 8th week you will be starting to burn out.

I just finished OVT which is based around 5x5 and here’s what my first bench warm-up looked like: shoulder circuit, 135x5,175x5,205x5 then went to my first work set at 245x5. I’ve found that the heavier the load, the more warmups I need.

[quote]Uncle Gabby wrote:
Are you doing still doing Madcow’s version of the Bill Starr 5x5? If so the first 4 out of the 5 sets and the first 3 out of the 4 sets on Wednesday are warmups. For example, a 5x5 squat, with 225 for the heaviest set would look like

115 x 5
145 x 5
175 x 5
200 x 5
225 x 5.

For the military press, going for 135:

75 x 5
95 x 5
115 x 5
135 x 5

Since you are squatting, benching and rowing heavy 3 times a week, 5 worksets are way too much volume. This will seem too easy at first, but if you do the program as written, after the 4th week you will be setting PRs every week, and by the 8th week you will be starting to burn out.
[/quote]

Good summary. I’m doing this now and am liking it.