T Nation

Volume Vs Failure?

Reading “between the lines” of some posts I came to the conclusion that training for volume is different of training to muscule failure…

I didn’t know this.
Can you guys explain me.

I always train to failure…
I thought this is the best and ONLY way to stress the muscles,hence making them grow.

Wow, with the amount of writing necessary to get you out of the dark here, you should just read the articles.

[quote]Horazio wrote:
Reading “between the lines” of some posts I came to the conclusion that training for volume is different of training to muscule failure…

I didn’t know this.
Can you guys explain me.

I always train to failure…
I thought this is the best and ONLY way to stress the muscles,hence making them grow.
[/quote]

Training volume is the number of sets and reps that you do in a given workout. Think of it as the distance that you move the weights during reps in your workout. It is an attribute of your workout routine.

Training to failure is a completely different concept. Training to failure is more of a technique…it means lifting a weight until your body can no longer move that weight due to fatigue.

See what Im saying?

Post your normal workout routine…I think I may be a little confused as to what you are talking about.

[quote]Horazio wrote:
I always train to failure…
I thought this is the best and ONLY way to stress the muscles,hence making them grow.
[/quote]

It certainly is not the ONLY way, and there’s nothing to say it is the best way. Your muscles will only grow if they have to lift progressively heavier weights with progressively higher volume.

Failure is not a necessity at all when it comes to muscle growth. If you go from deadlifting 200 lbs. for 5x5 to deadlifting 400 lbs. for 5x5, you will have gained a lot of muscle regardless of whether you hit failure or not.

…When I train I do 3 or 4 sets of 8,10 reps.
What I meant is that I feel I’ve done a good workout when I reach failure,when I can’t perform the last rep(s).

After a while (weeks,or months) when I’m able to complete the exercise I add more weight so I reach failure again…
This is my technique so far.
I just don’t care much about the exact number of reps or sets as long as I exaust my muscles.

I thought this was the only method to grow.

Read this.

The 3 Ways
by Chad Waterbury

If you’re training to improve maximal strength and size, then you need to recruit as many motor units as possible while training. There are three ways to do this according to Zatsiorsky:

  1. Lift a maximal load.
  2. Lift a submaximal load as fast as possible.
  3. Lift a submaximal load to failure.

Most of my programs revolve around the first two methods. I usually limit the failure training to the concentric phase only because isometric and eccentric failure can induce very high levels of fatigue. The risks associated with failure training rarely outweigh the benefits. Stick with the first two methods for the majority of your workouts.