T Nation

Vitamin A: Are you getting too much?

After suffering intense headaches, vomiting, and having their skin peel off in sheets, it wasn’t long before Arctic explorers began to have doubts about a dietary mainstay: polar bear. A laboratory analysis ensued, confirming these suspicions and specifically implicating the liver of the polar bear as the source of the explorers’ condition. Liver contains high levels of vitamin A, and because polar bears subsist largely on seals, including seal liver, their own livers are loaded with vitamin A. It turns out that a single ounce of polar bear liver - the size of a golf ball - contains more than five times the vitamin A dose considered toxic for humans. For this reason, the latest government guidelines encourage you to be moderate with your polar bear liver intake.

Jokes aside, there is a growing concern that Americans are consuming an excessive of vitamin A from animal products, supplements, and fortified foods combined. Certainly this excess is not causing your skin to fall away, but it may be increasing your risk for osteoporosis. Take a closer look at your diet to find out if you’re getting too much.

Benefits of Vitamin A

Vitamin A is an essential fat-soluble nutrient that plays a critical role in healthy vision, growth, bone development, reproduction, immune function, and healthy epithelial tissues (read as cancer prevention). There is epidemiological evidence to suggest that a higher dietary intake of vitamin A lowers breast cancer risk among pre-menopausal women with a positive family history of breast cancer. Another large study found that vitamin A intake reduces the risk of cataracts.

Animal Vitamin A (Retinol) versus Plant Vitamin A

(Carotenoids)

There are two main sources of vitamin A: animal sources which contain preformed vitamin A as retinol and plant sources containing carotenoids, like beta-carotene, that the body converts to retinol.

· Retinol - primary sources are certain animal products, fortified margarine, fortified low-fat dairy products, other fortified foods, and supplements. 66% of all vitamin A intake in the American diet comes from retinol or preformed vitamin A added to foods (mostly as retinyl palmitate). Vitamin A is also found in supplements (as retinyl palmitate and retinyl acetate). Tolerable upper limit: 10,000 IU daily (see more below).

· Carotenoids - primary sources are green and yellow vegetables, especially carrots. 33% of all vitamin A intake in the American diet comes from the carotenoids in foods. Mixed carotenoids (a blend of different carotenoids) can be taken as a supplement whereas multiple vitamins only contain one carotenoid: beta-carotene. Tolerable upper limit: none.

Risks of Not Getting Enough Vitamin A

Worldwide, up to half a million malnourished children go blind each year because of vitamin A deficiency. In the U.S., deficiency is more likely to be found in those eating a severely restricted and unhealthy diet or among alcoholics. Alcohol accelerates the breakdown of retinol through enzymatic activity and interferes with the conversion of carotenoids to retinol (Note: Heavy alcohol drinkers - 2+ drinks daily - are advised to take a multiple vitamin containing preformed vitamin A as retinyl acetate or retinyl palmitate).

Risks of Consuming Too Much Vitamin A

The primary risks of too much vitamin A (either acute or chronic excess) are birth defects, liver abnormalities, central nervous system disorders, and lower bone mineral density that might increase osteoporosis risk. Since the American diet contains many fortified foods, the relationship between vitamin A and decreased bone density has become a greater concern.

Both human and animal studies show that a higher vitamin A intake interferes with bone metabolism. Specifically, excess vitamin A suppresses osteoblast (bone-building) activity, stimulates osteoclast (bone breakdown) formation, and interferes with vitamin D’s role in calcium absorption and regulation.

In one study, women consuming more than 6,660 IU daily of vitamin A as retinol in food or supplements (the daily recommendation for adult women is 2,310 IU) were found to have twice the hip fracture risk compared to those consuming 1,700 IU daily or less. Men with the highest blood levels of retinol are seven times more likely to fracture a hip than men with lower levels (study details). There is evidence that older individuals have higher blood levels of vitamin A because of a reduced ability to metabolize vitamin A as efficiently as one ages.

The chart below shows the most concentrated vitamin A sources, both animal and plant. As you can see, fortification (see blue section) makes it easy to surpass the 6,660 IU level, especially if you regularly consume liver, cod liver oil, margarine, butter, and cheese.

Note: All vitamin A toxicity issues pertain to retinol intake (in foods and supplements containing retinol, retinyl palmitate, or retinyl acetate) and NOT supplemental or food-based carotenoid intake (like beta-carotene).

Animal Sources of Vitamin A
Serving
Vitamin A
(IU)
%RDA
Women
%RDA
Men

Polar bear liver
1 oz
100,000 IU
4,330%
3,330%

Turkey giblets
½ cup
25,950
1120%
865%

Beef liver
3 oz
22,175
960%
740%

Cod liver oil
1 tsp
4,500
200%
150%

Chicken liver
3 oz
4,255
185%
140%

Braunschweiger (liver sausage)
2 slices
7,975
345%
265%

Beef stew, canned
1 cup
3,860
165%
130%

Malted drink mix, w/ whole milk 1 cup
3,032
130%
100%

Centrum Multi, Original & Silver
1 tablet
2,485
110%
80%

Slim Fast 1 can
809
35%
25%

Kellogg’s Product 19
1 cup
750
30%
25%

Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain Cereal Bar
1 bar
750
30%
25%

Fortified breakfast cereals
1 cup
500-750
20-30%
15-25%

Ensure
1 can
578
25%
20%

Kellogg’s Raisin Bran
1 cup
517
20%
15%

Skim milk, added vitamin A
1 cup
500
20%
15%

Margarine, added vitamin A
1 tbsp
500
20%
15%

Butter
1 tbsp
355
15%
10%

Egg
1 large
335
15%
10%

Salmon
3.5 oz
324
15%
10%

Cheddar cheese
1 oz
284
12%
9%

Whole milk
1 cup
250
10%
8%

Plant Sources of Vitamin A
(as carotenoids)
Serving
Vitamin A
(IU)
%RDA
Women
%RDA
Men

Sweet potato
1 med.
28,058
1215%
935%

Pumpkin, canned
½ cup
19,065
825%
635%

Carrots, cooked
½ cup
13,418
580%
445%

Spinach, cooked
½ cup
11,458
495%
380%

Collards, cooked
½ cup
9,769
420%
325%

Kale, cooked
½ cup
9,558
415%
320%

Turnip greens, cooked
½ cup
8,828
380%
290%

Winter squash
½ cup
5,353
230%
175%

Red peppers, cooked
½ cup
3,738
160%
125%

Cantaloupe
1 cup
5,411
235%
180%

Lettuce, Green Leaf
1 cup
4,147
180%
135%

Green peas, cooked
1 cup
3,360
145%
110%

Apricots, dried
3
2,022
88%
65%

Butternut squash, cooked 1/2 cup
1,900 IU
80%
60%

Broccoli, cooked
½ cup
1,208
52%
40%

Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18
Hippie Wisdom

· If you’re taking a multivitamin, look for one that contains no more than 3,000 IU of vitamin A in the active form (indicated on the label as retinol, retinyl acetate, or retinyl palmitate). Many manufacturers are reducing levels or replacing with beta-carotene. There are no toxicity issues with beta-carotene or other carotenoids.

· Limit liver intake. If you eat liver, make sure it’s from an animal that was fed a vegetarian diet (no added by-products or medications). The liver is a detoxifying organ that can store pollutants.

· If you take cod liver oil, limit to a teaspoon daily and pay close attention to the other vitamin A sources in your diet

· Avoid/minimize fortified foods (breakfast cereals, cereal bars, shake mixes, meal replacements, energy bars, and margarine). Instead, choose foods that are fortified by nature, i.e. whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, and quality animal products.

· Instead of taking a carotenoid supplement (like mixed carotenoids), make carotenoid-rich plant foods, including dark green leafy vegetables, carrots, sweet potatoes, and winter squash a regular part of your diet. Try Casey’s Butternut Squash Soup and Popeye’s Collards this week.

Links:

More About Winter Squash and How to Eat It

Vitamin A & Hip Fracture Risk

I take one table spoon of Cod Liver Oil a day providing 2100-3600 IU a day, a maximum of 75% daily value.

Have been doing so for YEARS. Why am I not worried? Well to go overboard from other food sources is practically not possible. The most I get would be from fruits/veggies and that is in the carotene form so it is safe.

I am not worried about interference with vitamin D, I get 1200 IU 300% RDA (although RDA is being revised to 1000 IU for vitamin D) and if I need more than that my body will just make some when I take in some sun.

My favorite article on Cod Liver Oil, vit A/D:

http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/cod-liver-oil-menu.html

Simply my opinion.

I eat a ton of canned pumpkin, which has a ton of vitA per serving. After reading all this I think maybe I need to scale back a little, which sucks because its so damn good.

So you cut and paste a website hoping to do what? I could find you a thousand websites that say if you eat more than 20g of protein a day you will die a horrible and painful death. I think we all know better.

I think I’m getting way too much. Thanks for the info.

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
So you cut and paste a website hoping to do what? I could find you a thousand websites that say if you eat more than 20g of protein a day you will die a horrible and painful death. I think we all know better.[/quote]

exactly. nice screen name too (FDApple).

glad i wasn’t the only one confused by the incoherent drivel of the OP

[quote]bw1985 wrote:
I eat a ton of canned pumpkin, which has a ton of vitA per serving. After reading all this I think maybe I need to scale back a little, which sucks because its so damn good.[/quote]

Haha, are you serious? Who the hell worries about hypervitaminosis, really? The same people who freak over plastic water bottles?

How big are you worriers? This is one of the last things I would bother wasting time fretting over.