T Nation

Video of My Latest Fight

This fight was against a Lumpini and Rajadamnern veteran. He hit HARD. Was a bit of a war!

Sorry to thread hijack, but does anyone know if things like asthma will prevent you from competing…

Do they care? Do you sign a medical waiver, stating you’re okay to fight?

FUCKING NICE!

You really controlled the ring and were the obvious aggressor… what weight do you fight at?

fastest hijack EVA

HangerBaby, if you’re talking about fighting in Thailand, they wouldn’t care if you had one leg, let alone if you had asthma, they will let you fight regardless haha Don’t know whether asthma would be a problem in the US though.

Thanks Xen, it’s my biggest fight to date. I fight at 68 kgs (150 lbs). I’m a tall skinny guy, but I think a lot of people are surprised by my strength. I’ve been continuing to do the one arm clean and presses, chin ups etc using the 3 x 3 system and it’s really bolstered my strength without adding weight that is perfect. Also been doing a lot of isometrics. Next fight is one the 14th!

Great fight!

Thanks for posting it.

Good job

Hey there! those rice noodles working for you yeah? hahaha. Now atleast i know what lifting you are doing.

Holy crap you did a KO? only time i KO’ed someone fighting was when he slipped and hit his head on a car in the car park. =/

Keep at it. and when you told me you wanted to lean down and gain muscle. Dude. you are as lean as… lean… can… be?.. MORE RICE NOODLES!

man you received those kicks like nothing. Muai Thai Knee strikes are said to deliver the most damage in all kicking movements in all martial arts. =/

No do not argue with me. argue with national geographic for telling me that.

Haha thanks tayjeremy. I’m pretty lean but some of the Thai fighters are ridiculously lean, I will put some pics up of some of the fighters from my gym soon.

In the fight I didn’t feel the kicks and just wanted to go forward the whole time. The next day both my arms were swollen and the sides of my body were red, black and blue haha I love Muay Thai :slight_smile:

awesome fight, man. you didn’t stop for 1 sec. you really have great conditioning keep it up!

[quote]tayjeremy wrote:
man you received those kicks like nothing. Muai Thai Knee strikes are said to deliver the most damage in all kicking movements in all martial arts. =/

No do not argue with me. argue with national geographic for telling me that.[/quote]

You can wreck someone with knees, but it isn’t a powerful movement. All it is, is a knee lift. That is why a stabilization technique like grabbing ahold of your opponent or pulling him in is usually combined with knees.

For a pure kicking technique the mule kick, which uses the same biomechanics as a squat or deadlift is going to give you the most power. Plus the heel is a smaller striking surface than the knee so the power is concentrated into a smaller area.

[quote]JonnyTMT wrote:
Haha thanks tayjeremy. I’m pretty lean but some of the Thai fighters are ridiculously lean, I will put some pics up of some of the fighters from my gym soon.

In the fight I didn’t feel the kicks and just wanted to go forward the whole time. The next day both my arms were swollen and the sides of my body were red, black and blue haha I love Muay Thai :-)[/quote]

Good fight congratulations on the win. You definately were the aggressor. You most definately were going forward. Straight forward. You definately can take a shot. Have you ever considered using angles?

[quote]Sifu wrote:

You can wreck someone with knees, but it isn’t a powerful movement. All it is, is a knee lift. That is why a stabilization technique like grabbing ahold of your opponent or pulling him in is usually combined with knees.
[/quote]

Ok…

Granted lifting your leg up isn’t that powerful and while pulling your opponent into you simultaneously creates a much more devestating head on collision type effect… it is by NO MEANS not a powerful movement.

a properly executed knee is a VIGOROUS thusting forward of the knee, partial hip AND triple extension of the leg thats still on the ground.

your upper body is vigorously torqued and ‘thrown’ in the opposite direction to provide full extension and power.

A well executed knee should be thrown with enough force to lift you well off of the ground.

the same amount of force you generate in a sprint up hill should be generated in your muay thai knees.

there should be an explosion of force and TANG that knee should stab into your advesary.

jonny threw quite a few curve knees as well in fight and likewise those are also a considerably powerful technique using the rotation of your body rather than triple extension.

Of course it is made more powerful by causing a collision effect but the simple act of opening your hip, and slamming your knee like you slam a door while torquing your upper body in the opposite direction generates a lot more force than I feel that you’re assuming.

Just personally I’d rather get punched in the face than knee’d in the body.

Thanks for the comments Sifu.

Have to disagree with you about knees, Knees are EXTREMELY powerful and far more than just a knee lift. In Muay Thai the knee is thrust forward using the hips, using all the muscles of the legs and core. Frequently it is thrown with out clinching an opponent and is still very powerful. Personally I can knee far harder than I can kick.

Yes I walk forward a lot looking for the clinch where I can use knees and elbows (my best weapons). In Muay Thai this is called the “fighter” style. In Thailand the fights are judged differently from how a lot of westerners are used to. Punches hardly score, the big scoring techniques are body kicks and knees. I’m not a great kicker so I have to walk forward to shut down my opponent and start laying in the knees. That said, I have been working a lot on using more angles with my boxing by training with a WBA champ and a Canadian champ boxer. Hopefully will see an improvement in my next fight.

haha the that style of judging makes alot of sense. Getting knocked in the head with a jab is alot more enjoyable/tolerable than getting knocked in the head with an elbow. am i right?

  • a back elbow will almost naturally align with the back of the opponents head. Last i heard, that is very damaging. :wink:

If anyone wondered whether Sifu is a TMA guy, well, there’s your confirmation.

I once literally had my ribs broken holding pads for a guy doing knees. “This guy isn’t that strong. No need to brace myself.”

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
I once literally had my ribs broken holding pads for a guy doing knees. “This guy isn’t that strong. No need to brace myself.”[/quote]

ho-lee-phuc. That guy knee’s HARD.

but yea he’s just misinformed about thai-style. While counterfighting is a viable technique (and used successfully) pressing the action is viewed better in Thailand.

This was the same in American Boxing at the earlier part of the 20th century…

i Johnson’s boxing style was very distinctive. He developed a more patient approach than was customary in that day: playing defensively, waiting for a mistake, and then capitalizing on it. Johnson always began a bout cautiously, slowly building up over the rounds into a more aggressive fighter. He often fought to punish his opponents rather than knock them out, endlessly avoiding their blows and striking with swift counters.He always gave the impression of having much more to offer and, if pushed, he could punch quite powerfully. Johnson’s style was very effective, but it was criticized in the white press as being cowardly and devious.[/i]

Also Jonny did make use of angles quite a few times in his fight its just very hard to see as the muay thai angles are quite a bit differen than most are used to seeing. Also his opponent turned to face him immediately when he did cut corners and his opponent was also hard to funnel into the corners.

Jonny controlled the center of the ring which is very important in scoring Thaiboxing. Just like in chess where the person who controls the 4 central squares at the middle of the board often control the pace and flow of the game so is the fight game in Thaiboxing.

He conserves energy and forces his opponent either to run, get ran into the ropes or a corner, stand and bang or waste energy trying to trick/beat his way to gain ring control.

While Jonny’s adrenaline high showed us a few mistakes of his… experts it does not make any of us. He’s fighting in Thailand something not many of us even would attempt if we had the rare opportunity.

It was dude from one of those fight shows. Jimmy Smith? Dude was not that big, I didn’t know who he was, just thought he was a random guy off the street. So I grab the pads sort of loosely and “WTF?” my elbows are slamming into my ribs.

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
Xen Nova wrote: ho-lee-phuc. That guy knee’s HARD.

It was dude from one of those fight shows. Jimmy Smith? Dude was not that big, I didn’t know who he was, just thought he was a random guy off the street. So I grab the pads sort of loosely and “WTF?” my elbows are slamming into my ribs.[/quote]

The dude from Fight Quest? He’s not that big,but looks solid at 170lbs…and seems to be pretty intense when training.

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
Sifu wrote:

You can wreck someone with knees, but it isn’t a powerful movement. All it is, is a knee lift. That is why a stabilization technique like grabbing ahold of your opponent or pulling him in is usually combined with knees.

Ok…

Granted lifting your leg up isn’t that powerful and while pulling your opponent into you simultaneously creates a much more devestating head on collision type effect… it is by NO MEANS not a powerful movement.

a properly executed knee is a VIGOROUS thusting forward of the knee, partial hip AND triple extension of the leg thats still on the ground.

your upper body is vigorously torqued and ‘thrown’ in the opposite direction to provide full extension and power.

A well executed knee should be thrown with enough force to lift you well off of the ground.

the same amount of force you generate in a sprint up hill should be generated in your muay thai knees.

there should be an explosion of force and TANG that knee should stab into your advesary.

jonny threw quite a few curve knees as well in fight and likewise those are also a considerably powerful technique using the rotation of your body rather than triple extension.

Of course it is made more powerful by causing a collision effect but the simple act of opening your hip, and slamming your knee like you slam a door while torquing your upper body in the opposite direction generates a lot more force than I feel that you’re assuming.

Just personally I’d rather get punched in the face than knee’d in the body. [/quote]

What part of “You can wreck someone with knees” did you not understand? Before I wrote anything else I qualified my statement. But you still want to talk down to me like I am some kind of moron.

I never said that you can’t do some serious damage with a knee. My three lowest attached ribs were torn lose from the cartiledge that holds them to the rest of my ribcage by a knee to my back. It has bothered me all the time for twenty years. If I ever want to get it repaired I need major abdominal surgery to saw them loose and wire them back into their original location.

In the Isshinryu system (which I have studied since I was twelve) knees are a basic kick we teach to white belts and repeat throughout the various ranks. So you spare me the lecture on knees. I am well aware of how to use them and what they feel like.

Like it or not what I wrote is a statement of fact. The musculature involved in pulling the knee up towards the chest is not particularly powerful and does not have particularly good leverage either. That is why you will never see knee lifts or leg raises in a powerlifting contest. The lack of leverage is why you have to do a bunch of auxillary movements to make it more potent.

Extending the knee away from the chest and driving the heel on the other hand is an inherently powerful movement because it uses the largest most powerful muscle groups in the human body. That is why you see powerlifting competitions doing lifts that use this movement. The world record squat is over a thousand pounds. Try moving half that weight with a knee sometime see what happens.

While it is possible to lift someone off of the ground with a knee it is nothing like what you can do with side kick or mule kick. I’ve had one of my boys lift me up off of my feet and send me flying 4-5 feet by a skipping in sidekick. I’m lucky he was my boy because he pulled it.

I have teachers who have been all over the world studying martial arts including Thailand. It’s not like the Thai’s have some magical “secret” art that I don’t know.