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Variables In Vert. Jump/Explosiveness

So after reading a bit about motor units I wondered…what variables are there that contribute to how “explosive” one is…Can anyone give a relatively detailed explanation?

[quote]X-Factor wrote:
So after reading a bit about motor units I wondered…what variables are there that contribute to how “explosive” one is…Can anyone give a relatively detailed explanation?[/quote]

Here are the variables-

1.if you cant deep squat your double body weight on a bar-GET STRONGER LEGS.
2.if you can, start plyometrics training.
3. for great vertical,get your squat to triple bodyweight on a bar and ability to use much of that strenght in 0,3 sec force development in vertical jumping.

Good luck!

Type I muscle fibers (fast twitch) usually have larger amounts of mitochondria. If you remember high school biology, these are the power-houses of the cell and help with energy. The ability to recruit as many motor units as possible and as frequent as possible is also what impacts force production.

These are two factors however, through training you can change your own body’s ability to produce force.

There is a point at which additional strength in the squat no longer helps the vertical leap.

A 3xBW squat is well beyond that point.

Arguable since Ben Johnson squated well over triple body weight.

Factors which influence vertical:

Composition of muscle fibres (fast twitch to slow twitch)

Body fat levels

Tendon lengths

Strength levels

Force absorbtion and output capabilties

[quote]mdelaney wrote:
Type I muscle fibers (fast twitch) usually have larger amounts of mitochondria. If you remember high school biology, these are the power-houses of the cell and help with energy. The ability to recruit as many motor units as possible and as frequent as possible is also what impacts force production.

These are two factors however, through training you can change your own body’s ability to produce force.
[/quote]

Not to be an ass, but of the muscle fibers, the fast twitch ones have the least amount of mitochondria. This is why they get fatigued so much more quickly than the slow twitch and fast/slow twitch variety. Most of their energy is produced not aerobically, but anaerobically.

I agree that fast twitch muscle fibers play a factor in explosiveness, but not because of the mitochondria.

Ok I am an ass.

[quote]Checkmate wrote:
There is a point at which additional strength in the squat no longer helps the vertical leap.

A 3xBW squat is well beyond that point.[/quote]

i would have to argue that point as my vert has always increased as my squat went up, even past the 3 times bodyweight point. but i could be more the exception to the rule though.

[quote]smallmike wrote:
mdelaney wrote:
Type I muscle fibers (fast twitch) usually have larger amounts of mitochondria. If you remember high school biology, these are the power-houses of the cell and help with energy. The ability to recruit as many motor units as possible and as frequent as possible is also what impacts force production.

These are two factors however, through training you can change your own body’s ability to produce force.

Not to be an ass, but of the muscle fibers, the fast twitch ones have the least amount of mitochondria. This is why they get fatigued so much more quickly than the slow twitch and fast/slow twitch variety. Most of their energy is produced not aerobically, but anaerobically.

I agree that fast twitch muscle fibers play a factor in explosiveness, but not because of the mitochondria.

Ok I am an ass.

[/quote]

your correct, i read my book wrong. its not being an ass to correct someone

[quote]SquatDr wrote:
Checkmate wrote:
There is a point at which additional strength in the squat no longer helps the vertical leap.

A 3xBW squat is well beyond that point.

i would have to argue that point as my vert has always increased as my squat went up, even past the 3 times bodyweight point. but i could be more the exception to the rule though.

[/quote]

the book, science and practice, shows a good example of how athletes can increase their squat and vertical at the same time, however sometimes progress in this area stalls despite strength increases. in this instance athletes need to focus on rate of force development.

[quote]mdelaney wrote:
SquatDr wrote:
Checkmate wrote:
There is a point at which additional strength in the squat no longer helps the vertical leap.

A 3xBW squat is well beyond that point.

i would have to argue that point as my vert has always increased as my squat went up, even past the 3 times bodyweight point. but i could be more the exception to the rule though.

the book, science and practice, shows a good example of how athletes can increase their squat and vertical at the same time, however sometimes progress in this area stalls despite strength increases. in this instance athletes need to focus on rate of force development.

[/quote]

which i agree with to some degree, my point is, if i stall in one i stall in the other, but never just one or the other. meaning if my squat is stuck than so is my vert but if my squat goes up so does my vert. i dont like the, you need to squat such and such a weight to jump such and such a height.

i remember some guys telling me that if i had a squat of just 2.5 bodyweight that i should be able to jump the same height as i do currently. of course he was using some generalized chart and he has never seen me jump, lift etc.

obviously everyone is different, i have just never seen anyone including myself and all those who i train with, ever stall out in vert while their squat is still going up, despite reading several sources that say otherwise. lastly, i would think that most people doing vert type workouts would already be including force development work exercises in there.

it should also be noted that since i am a sprinter, as are my training partners, our lack of stalling out could be due to the fact that we do force development exercises most months out of the year also. good points guys.
AC