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Vacuum Sealed Bags for Meal Prep?

Hey guys I was looking around this site and couldn’t find much information on the questions I had in particular.

I am looking to prep my meals in bulk and use a vacuum sealer to help enhance the freshness and flavor of my meals. In doing so I had a few questions.

I understand vacuum sealing cooked meats like chicken, fish, and steak are relatively easy…

But… can you vacuum seal something like steamed carrots, spinach, or broccoli?

I was also wondering if you could vacuum seal an already cooked baked potato, steamed white rice, or a baked yam and then just pop it in the microwave when you wanted to eat it.

Do any of you guys eat vacuum sealed foods? How is the taste and freshness of the meats, vegetables, carbs 3-4 days AFTER they have been originally cooked.

I am not a big fan of freezing food because I don’t like the texture of it coming out of the freezer. When water freezes it expands and ruptures cell walls causing some items to become very mushy. Nutritionally, I am not certain it is very beneficial.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
I am not a big fan of freezing food because I don’t like the texture of it coming out of the freezer. When water freezes it expands and ruptures cell walls causing some items to become very mushy.

[/quote]

Uh, yeah…that is why we vacuum seal it…to avoid all that.

I have sealed food and eaten it a year later and it tasted damn near the same…especially if you seal it right after cooking.

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
I am not a big fan of freezing food because I don’t like the texture of it coming out of the freezer. When water freezes it expands and ruptures cell walls causing some items to become very mushy.

[/quote]

Uh, yeah…that is why we vacuum seal it…to avoid all that.

I have sealed food and eaten it a year later and it tasted damn near the same…especially if you seal it right after cooking.[/quote]

But water still freezes even when vacuum sealed. It’s just a texture thing for me, especially with vegetables.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
I am not a big fan of freezing food because I don’t like the texture of it coming out of the freezer. When water freezes it expands and ruptures cell walls causing some items to become very mushy.

[/quote]

Uh, yeah…that is why we vacuum seal it…to avoid all that.

I have sealed food and eaten it a year later and it tasted damn near the same…especially if you seal it right after cooking.[/quote]

But water still freezes even when vacuum sealed. It’s just a texture thing for me, especially with vegetables.[/quote]

There is much less expansion or enough space for significant water to form when vacuum sealing. That is why we do it. I seal most of the meat I cook. It helps when you eat as much as I do to only cook once or twice a week. Much less food ever goes wasted also.

I can spend one night cooking up pounds of beef that won’t go bad in 3 days in the fridge.

I don’t see how any huge guy who lifts wouldn’t see a benefit from them.

Thanks for the response Prof X.

But do you also vacuum seal your carbs and vegetables?

I feel like vacuum sealing a baked potato or yam and some steamed spinach wouldn’t be very effective…

Also, do you vacuum seal all your meals in one bag? Like for instance I was thinking of vacuum sealing my vegetables, protein, and carb all in the same bag, or do you just split them up?

[quote]JerryRicePwns wrote:
Thanks for the response Prof X.

But do you also vacuum seal your carbs and vegetables?

I feel like vacuum sealing a baked potato or yam and some steamed spinach wouldn’t be very effective…

Also, do you vacuum seal all your meals in one bag? Like for instance I was thinking of vacuum sealing my vegetables, protein, and carb all in the same bag, or do you just split them up?[/quote]

No, I don’t seal carbs. That would be a waste considering the amount I eat unless I was dieting and going on a long trip or something. Those bags are expensive.

I just cooked six 1lbs t-bone steaks last night. I sealed all of them. They were on sale so I can get the benefit of loading up on beef when it is 3 bucks a pound while everyone without a sealer talks on about how they hate water expansion as they spend an extra grand a year.

Thank you for your responses. Really appreciate it!

Thank you for your responses. Really appreciate it!

I just started buying the vacuum sealer bags off ebay, much cheaper. 100 quart bags go for under $20 w/ free shipping. If needed, I can cut the bags in half to have twice as much. Anyways, check it out.

Vacuum sealing is great after marathon cooking, such as grilling 8 steaks - eat one now and seal the rest. I typically re-heat by boiling the vacuum bag in water; it doesn’t dry out or ruin texture this way. Once boiled it is not only clearly thawed but hot to eat. Works well with steak and chicken.

As long as you don’t mind things being a bit squished, vac sealing is cool. Used to do it all the time at work.