T Nation

USMC Changing PT.

I thought someone might be interested about this article here.

It’s basically saying how they’re changing from the traditional style of “soldier training” to a more “combat athlete” style of training.

http://www.mcwl.usmc.mil/concepts/home.cfm

From article,
“Functional exercise” involves multiple planes and multiple
joints. Most human action (work) seems to involve a relatively
limited number of fundamental movements (such as lifting,
pushing, pulling, throwing, and locomotion). However, many
exercise routines (especially weight training or body building
as it is popularly practiced) follow a “reductionist” approach
that strives to de-construct a movement in order to apply
focused stress on a singular joint and muscle group.
Unfortunately, the human body does not work that way. The
body works together as a system and exercises that serve to
de-construct what are essentially irreducible (though
admittedly complex) movements, can create imbalance,
unnatural stress on muscles and joints, do not generate an ideal
adaptive response, and most importantly do not mimic the
reality that the Marine athlete will experience. "The key to
functional exercise is integration. It’s about teaching all the
muscles to work together rather than isolating them to work
independently."3

I’m highly impressed at the forward thinking displayed by the Corps in this report. I have always wondered why the self-described ‘premier volunteer fighting force’ was relegated to traditional, albeit ineffective, methods of training and I am very hopeful for the implementation of this new military training.

They even used works by Siff and Waterbury as resources

however the best part is the shot at “body builders”

Ok, havn’t read the whole article, but I’d like to think they’ll scale back the long distance running. I’ve always thought that Indian Runs and sprint intervals and stairs in gear would better prepare Marines for combat (current war at least) than the usual 3-7 mile runs they go on now.

Of course, do I think any canges will take effect SOON? ABSOLUTLY NOT. The Corps, particularly its SNCO/Officers are pretty stuck in their ways and there’s no better way to thrash a platoon than a good old fashioned distance run. This will be interesting.

DD

[quote]JokerFMJ wrote:
I thought someone might be interested about this article here.

It’s basically saying how they’re changing from the traditional style of “soldier training” to a more “combat athlete” style of training.

http://www.mcwl.usmc.mil/concepts/home.cfm[/quote]

At first I was a bit apprehensive. I envisioned a grizzled old gunnery sergeant barking at the fat recruit, “Oh, that’s right, Private Pyle, don’t make any effort to snatch that fucking kettlebell. Get your fat ass the fuck off my Bosu Ball!” Glad that’s not the case.

I’ve always thought that the USMC has been several steps ahead of the other services in terms of weapons training and combat conditioning, and the thought that our Marines will now be flipping tires and tossing medicine balls around does my heart proud.

Thanks for this link. I look forward to reading this, as law enforcement training has been outdated for quite some time now as well…Im going to do my best to help turn that ship around but its a long hard battle against the Cooper minded and personal fitness gurus out there…

[quote]Varqanir wrote:

At first I was a bit apprehensive. I envisioned a grizzled old gunnery sergeant barking at the fat recruit, “Oh, that’s right, Private Pyle, don’t make any effort to snatch that fucking kettlebell. Get your fat ass the fuck off my Bosu Ball!” Glad that’s not the case.

[/quote]

That is the funniest post I’ve read on this site in a long time. Classic movie…

[quote]Varqanir wrote:
JokerFMJ wrote:

It’s basically saying how they’re changing from the traditional style of “soldier training” to a more “combat athlete” style of training.

I’ve always thought that the USMC has been several steps ahead of the other services in terms of weapons training and combat conditioning, and the thought that our Marines will now be flipping tires and tossing medicine balls around does my heart proud.

[/quote]

Well said. A change in this direction will be most beneficial.

Uuuuhhhhrrrraaaahhhh !

[quote]Ugluk wrote:
Varqanir wrote:

At first I was a bit apprehensive. I envisioned a grizzled old gunnery sergeant barking at the fat recruit, “Oh, that’s right, Private Pyle, don’t make any effort to snatch that fucking kettlebell. Get your fat ass the fuck off my Bosu Ball!” Glad that’s not the case.

That is the funniest post I’ve read on this site in a long time. Classic movie…[/quote]

You suck dicks private? Bullshit! I bet you could suck a barbell through a garden hose!

[quote]bluecollarjock wrote:
Im going to do my best to help turn that ship around but its a long hard battle against the Cooper minded and personal fitness gurus out there…[/quote]

Cooper recommended working up to being able to run for a mile per day as well as resistance training multiple times per week. It tells you something about the people that recommend endless running in his name.

Thanks for working on changing the law enforcement fitness establishment, though, they need more people like you who realize what they’re doing now isn’t adequate.

-Dan

This is going to be awesome! I can see a field full of recruits front squatting ammo cans full of sand and then sprinting 100 yards, over and over again until they throw up. They will perform 100 pullups for time. Drill Instructors will make them do box jumps until they fall over.

I read this document, looked at the Master Sergeant who sits next to me who repeatedly tells me he doesn’t need to do any training but running, and yelled, " I told you so! Stand up and give me 100 overhead squats with a broom-stick!".

Semper Fi

um…okay so how can I prepare for this?

[quote]buffalokilla wrote:
Cooper recommended working up to being able to run for a mile per day as well as resistance training multiple times per week. It tells you something about the people that recommend endless running in his name.

Thanks for working on changing the law enforcement fitness establishment, though, they need more people like you who realize what they’re doing now isn’t adequate.

-Dan[/quote]

Thanks Dan. If there is any military or law enforcement staff out there trying to fight the same battle please let me know. Ive been having fun with cadets and recruits, and it shocked people that they actually enjoy working harder and are much more motivated than when they were doing slow paced 2 mile runs and getting free time in the weightroom.

Self esteem is through the roof from many in the recent generations who do not have military or athletic experience, and have never been pushed to believe in themselves. I have street officers, the SWAT commander, and staff instructors joining in the workouts for fun now with cadets and recruits.

All my workouts are structured and on the stop watch to squeeze in various aspects of the athletic wheel in a short amount of time…lots of variety, but today for instance the recruits did a 15 minute dynamic warm up, another 10 minutes on the speed ladder + mini hurdles, ~30 yard “good guy vs bad guy” sprints (basically a rabbit drill, one guy plays cop the other plays felon and cop needs to catch felon in 30 yards, they really love it), then 5x300 yard shuttles each rep in under 85 seconds with 1:1 work:rest, then in the weightroom DB sumo squats (teaching proper form to carry over into dummy drags, good power position), hurdle mobility over/unders, and chins.

Tomorrow morning the cadets have dynamic warm up, speed ladder, mini hurdles, sprints, rope climb, then some full body DB complexes. I alternate full body DB complexes with med ball full body movements every other workout. Lots of squat movements, chins, RDLs, rows, etc etc…with lots of agility drills and sprint work, dummy drags, med ball throws or slams, jump rope, “mystery” obstacle courses, etc. Always start with dynamic warm up, bodyweight drills, and speed ladder.

Ive been blessed enough to have experience as a former college athlete and former college strength coach (still volunteer when time permits). So what is “old” news to me and guys/gals on this site, is “new” and exciting to old school PT people in LE and military…

well, its either new and exciting to them, or a blow to tradition and tons of meetings and headaches from explaining myself and backing why I do not believe in Cooper, slow steady state runs, and all the other stuff typically done at police academies (Ive been through 2 myself in 2 different states).

Lots of resistance to change…in the end though, if I can lay my head to rest at night knowing I potentially prepared people physically and mentally to stay alive when the *(&&%^ hits the fan, Ill deal with the headaches and negotiating the resistance.

God Bless

Bluecollarjock,
Hey bro, I’d love to hear some of the work you’re doing to change the PT standards/workouts where you’re at. I’ve been smacking my head against a brick wall for a while to change things in my Army units.

I get success with individual soldiers, but if I get it with a “unit” it’s usually short lived. Ironically, now that I’m a civilian, I get more positive attention than when I was in. Go figure.

If you’d be willing ot share any of your successful arguments and/or workouts, I’d greatly appreciate it since I still train soldiers out here at Bragg. I’m actually writing a PT plan proposal for a company this week.

Take care and keep up the good work.

-B

P.S. Anybody able to send me or post a copy of the file on the link? I can’t seem to get mine to work.

[quote]Bluecollarjock,
Hey bro, I’d love to hear some of the work you’re doing to change the PT standards/workouts where you’re at. I’ve been smacking my head against a brick wall for a while to change things in my Army units.

I get success with individual soldiers, but if I get it with a “unit” it’s usually short lived. Ironically, now that I’m a civilian, I get more positive attention than when I was in. Go figure.

If you’d be willing ot share any of your successful arguments and/or workouts, I’d greatly appreciate it since I still train soldiers out here at Bragg. I’m actually writing a PT plan proposal for a company this week.

Take care and keep up the good work.

-B[/quote]

Sir, Id do anything to help out with people who are providing my blanket of freedom. Ill send my email in a PM and we can go from there. I can forward alot of the workouts Ive been doing, but it might be easier to talk on the phone to explain the different names and what they mean.

I actually did an intern with a guy who may still do some contract training at Ft Bragg but Im not sure. He runs www.stormmountain.com, very sweet place to do some tactical shooting schools.

There is a desperate need for people who put their lives on the line for us to get better training!!! I just got off the phone with an old college teammate of mine, ex All American linebacker from Air Force, 3 years in the NFL, who owns his own training business in LA and is working with some govt guys…another friend who is my former boss from coaching is a well known author and speaker in the S&C field, and Im trying to work on getting him to come to my agency as well for a clinic…we spend SO MUCH money on bullcrap contracts with all kinds of subpar marketing guru’s in various subjects, an I know Im going to have to fight tooth and nail to try to get the right people here…

Just today the rumor was they are going to extend some contract they have with this ex American Gladiator personal trainer chick who got somehow weasled her way into training some of our supervisors on the tax payers dime…and they may allow her to start training groups of cops too, all while they are hesitant to allow me to do more group sessions outside of the cadets and recruits…I have SWAT, Gang unit, “Jump Out” street crimes unit, and numerous hard charging street officers who want me to provide group training sessions for them but they are stalling or giving excuses of how it might distract me from teaching CPR or Taser a few times a year…Im telling you my blood pressure goes up and down everyday…its all worth it though to get the feedback from those who I am actually training, they would run through a brick wall for me if I asked and you can just see them believing in themselves more and more.

Ok, I could ramble forever about this topic!

Bluecollerjack,
I would like any info you might pass along also. I’m with a USNR unit that just returned from over there and we could use more functional training. I’t be nice to possibly incorporate some of this into our training. I appreciate your willingness to share with the troops.

Paul

Blondeguy and Paul, if you guys could email or post up here if you wish, some background on the current set up of your workouts I can start brainstorming how to help. Things like how many times per week do you train, how long are the sessions, how big are the groups, what types of soldiers are in your sessions (are they admin officers or spec op guys, or a combo of different types of soldiers), where do you do your PT sessions, what equipment you have available, etc. Also what goals or standard tests do you have to meet, what are your operational goals you want these workouts to carry over into improving performance, etc.

Thanks for your service!