T Nation

USDA Removes Fat Limit on Diet


#1

-Replacing saturated fat with carbs did not reduce CHD risk
-Dietary cholesterol is not a nutrient of concer
-There is no limit to percentage of calories you get from fat

If you can find the second page they also discuss all of the harms of the low fat recommendations on school lunches.


#2

Wow, that’s huge. Stuff a lot of us knew, but to see it affect official policy is a big deal.


#3

Being European, I’m astonished
You guys should see how conservative euro public authorities are about food and recommended intakes…

Great info that I’m gonna share instantly


#4

Maybe my browsing skills are not first-class, but I could never find the second page. Any suggestions?


#5

Keep in mind, this is a report by the Dietary Guideline Advisory Committee. The Secretaries of Agriculture and Health and Human Services still have to review the reports before any changes would take effect. Even after the changes are published (assuming they are) it will likely take quite some time before the changes are implemented in meaningful ways (such as school lunches).

However, yes, it is really good news to see the science begin to make its way into the bureaucracy of America’s health.


#6

[quote]dbickley wrote:
Maybe my browsing skills are not first-class, but I could never find the second page. Any suggestions?[/quote]

My wife is a cardiologist and got the article from JAMA. I couldn’t find it online.


#7

[quote]tontongg wrote:
Being European, I’m astonished
You guys should see how conservative euro public authorities are about food and recommended intakes…

Great info that I’m gonna share instantly [/quote]

Sweden recently removed all “low fat” public health guidelines.


#8

[quote]Dr J wrote:
Keep in mind, this is a report by the Dietary Guideline Advisory Committee. The Secretaries of Agriculture and Health and Human Services still have to review the reports before any changes would take effect. Even after the changes are published (assuming they are) it will likely take quite some time before the changes are implemented in meaningful ways (such as school lunches).

However, yes, it is really good news to see the science begin to make its way into the bureaucracy of America’s health. [/quote]

Doctors could have been sued for telling patients to eat more than 35% fat (if the patient had any bad outcome) and the old guidelines could have stood against them in court. My wife’s cardiology group regularly discussed that hospital policy prohibited going against ACC guideliness (without a lot of waivers or documented justifications) and the ACC and USDA had an upper limit of 35% fat (which was actually raised 5 years ago from 30%). At one point the USDA had a 55% to 70% carb range in their guidelines. in 2010 it went down to about 45-65% depending on how you interpret the protein guidelines. Now it would stand at anywhere from 25% to 65% as they still recommend about 25% carbs to meat basic brain needs. Next up may be removal of any saturated fat limit.


#9

It also took some balls. Consider that they had been telling diabetics to limit fat consumption because heart disease was the main killer for diabetics, and you know, the old lipid hypothesis of heart disease and all.


#10

A public body recognizing decades of wrong practices, takes some balls indeed