Upper Chest

Mdduckworth:Most of us,at least people i know love to bench as a primary chest exercise.I usually do incline 2nd as im weaker and ,moreover don’t enjoy it as much.I believe the pectorals are influnced by our genetic’s and exercise can influence the development,but it can’t-In my opinion? substantialy mandate growth,growth like with our calves is pretty-well dna consistent. thanks

Bench press to the neck. Squuueeeeze…

[quote]johnny k53 wrote:
Mdduckworth:Most of us,at least people i know love to bench as a primary chest exercise.I usually do incline 2nd as im weaker and ,moreover don’t enjoy it as much.I believe the pectorals are influnced by our genetic’s and exercise can influence the development,but it can’t-In my opinion? substantialy mandate growth,growth like with our calves is pretty-well dna consistent. thanks[/quote]

I believe CT suggested that pressing movements should ideally go from vertical pressing to horizontal pressing… and I believe the reason was shoulder health. I don’t know the details, but I think that’s what he said.

Depending on how your actual split is structured, this could potentially be: overhead pressing → high incline → low incline → flat → decline.

Can anyone else comment on that? I don’t remember which article I read it in… but I don’t think I’m making it up.

[quote]LoRez wrote:

I believe CT suggested that pressing movements should ideally go from vertical pressing to horizontal pressing… and I believe the reason was shoulder health. I don’t know the details, but I think that’s what he said.

Depending on how your actual split is structured, this could potentially be: overhead pressing → high incline → low incline → flat → decline.

Can anyone else comment on that? I don’t remember which article I read it in… but I don’t think I’m making it up.[/quote]

Please STOP! Your post would do more if you built an upper chest, then informed everyone how you did it. Your offering advice by PARROTING is wasteful! You are in still in the “ask questions phase” and should NOT offer advice until you can show from experience. ASK more questions and post LESS advice PLEASE!

REALLY! Are you going for some award for most post in a year? I mean every damn thread?

[quote]Vagina Whisperer wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:

I believe CT suggested that pressing movements should ideally go from vertical pressing to horizontal pressing… and I believe the reason was shoulder health. I don’t know the details, but I think that’s what he said.

Depending on how your actual split is structured, this could potentially be: overhead pressing → high incline → low incline → flat → decline.

Can anyone else comment on that? I don’t remember which article I read it in… but I don’t think I’m making it up.[/quote]

Please STOP! Your post would do more if you built an upper chest, then informed everyone how you did it. Your offering advice by PARROTING is wasteful! You are in still in the “ask questions phase” and should NOT offer advice until you can show from experience. ASK more questions and post LESS advice PLEASE!

REALLY! Are you going for some award for most post in a year? I mean every damn thread?
[/quote]
Dude, LoRez won’t stop, trust me. I’ve called him out elsewhere and he still has an answer for everything. He’s not so obnoxious as to be labeled a “troll” like the others, but I’m with you, if you don’t look awesome or have killer #'s you should be silent.
Awesome meme!

Aside fom all the usual movements, I’ve found resistance band pull-overs, seated on a bench (band looped over the top of the pull-up handles + hands about shoulder width apart or a lil wider) can work pretty well as an chest/upper chest finisher.

Much kinder on the joints than flys + with a lil practice/experimentation you can maintain a ridiculous amount of tension on teh pecs (especially if you focus on squeezing them & focussing on short range movements/take your lats out of the equation as much as possible).

You could also try this with cables if you don’t have access to any bands, I just find bands work better for this kind of work

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
If your intent is to target upper pecs, try this:

Set your bench to a very low incline. Now when you do barbell bench presses or DB bench presses (preferred), shrug your shoulders up to your ears as you push the weight up. Hold at the top for a moment, then lower the weight as you un-shrug your shoulders.

This hits my upper pecs like nothing else. [/quote]

ID,

Just so I’m understanding you correctly: you keep the shoulder blades pulled back and the traps locked in place, but just shrug the shoulders themselves as you press up?

Thanks

[quote]leon79 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
If your intent is to target upper pecs, try this:

Set your bench to a very low incline. Now when you do barbell bench presses or DB bench presses (preferred), shrug your shoulders up to your ears as you push the weight up. Hold at the top for a moment, then lower the weight as you un-shrug your shoulders.

This hits my upper pecs like nothing else. [/quote]

ID,

Just so I’m understanding you correctly: you keep the shoulder blades pulled back and the traps locked in place, but just shrug the shoulders themselves as you press up?

Thanks[/quote]

No, no! Let the scaps go NATURALLY where they want. Don’t even think about them.
IMHO, keeping the scaps pulled back and locked in place throughout the entire ROM is not natural or healthy for the shoulders.

Again, shrug shoulders up to ears as you raise the weight, and let them come down as you lower the weight.

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]Vagina Whisperer wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:

I believe CT suggested that pressing movements should ideally go from vertical pressing to horizontal pressing… and I believe the reason was shoulder health. I don’t know the details, but I think that’s what he said.

Depending on how your actual split is structured, this could potentially be: overhead pressing → high incline → low incline → flat → decline.

Can anyone else comment on that? I don’t remember which article I read it in… but I don’t think I’m making it up.[/quote]

Please STOP! Your post would do more if you built an upper chest, then informed everyone how you did it. Your offering advice by PARROTING is wasteful! You are in still in the “ask questions phase” and should NOT offer advice until you can show from experience. ASK more questions and post LESS advice PLEASE!

REALLY! Are you going for some award for most post in a year? I mean every damn thread?
[/quote]
Dude, LoRez won’t stop, trust me. I’ve called him out elsewhere and he still has an answer for everything. He’s not so obnoxious as to be labeled a “troll” like the others, but I’m with you, if you don’t look awesome or have killer #'s you should be silent.
Awesome meme![/quote]

Ok.

But I was actually asking a question here.

99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]leon79 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
If your intent is to target upper pecs, try this:

Set your bench to a very low incline. Now when you do barbell bench presses or DB bench presses (preferred), shrug your shoulders up to your ears as you push the weight up. Hold at the top for a moment, then lower the weight as you un-shrug your shoulders.

This hits my upper pecs like nothing else. [/quote]

ID,

Just so I’m understanding you correctly: you keep the shoulder blades pulled back and the traps locked in place, but just shrug the shoulders themselves as you press up?

Thanks[/quote]

No, no! Let the scaps go NATURALLY where they want. Don’t even think about them.
IMHO, keeping the scaps pulled back and locked in place throughout the entire ROM is not natural or healthy for the shoulders.

Again, shrug shoulders up to ears as you raise the weight, and let them come down as you lower the weight.
[/quote]

As someone with a weak upper chest I have been following this thread, but this just does not sound good to me. I would take my chances with slight incline presses.

[quote]Maiden3.16 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]leon79 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
If your intent is to target upper pecs, try this:

Set your bench to a very low incline. Now when you do barbell bench presses or DB bench presses (preferred), shrug your shoulders up to your ears as you push the weight up. Hold at the top for a moment, then lower the weight as you un-shrug your shoulders.

This hits my upper pecs like nothing else. [/quote]

ID,

Just so I’m understanding you correctly: you keep the shoulder blades pulled back and the traps locked in place, but just shrug the shoulders themselves as you press up?

Thanks[/quote]

No, no! Let the scaps go NATURALLY where they want. Don’t even think about them.
IMHO, keeping the scaps pulled back and locked in place throughout the entire ROM is not natural or healthy for the shoulders.

Again, shrug shoulders up to ears as you raise the weight, and let them come down as you lower the weight.
[/quote]

As someone with a weak upper chest I have been following this thread, but this just does not sound good to me. I would take my chances with slight incline presses.
[/quote]

Try it.

[quote]Maiden3.16 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]leon79 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
If your intent is to target upper pecs, try this:

Set your bench to a very low incline. Now when you do barbell bench presses or DB bench presses (preferred), shrug your shoulders up to your ears as you push the weight up. Hold at the top for a moment, then lower the weight as you un-shrug your shoulders.

This hits my upper pecs like nothing else. [/quote]

ID,

Just so I’m understanding you correctly: you keep the shoulder blades pulled back and the traps locked in place, but just shrug the shoulders themselves as you press up?

Thanks[/quote]

No, no! Let the scaps go NATURALLY where they want. Don’t even think about them.
IMHO, keeping the scaps pulled back and locked in place throughout the entire ROM is not natural or healthy for the shoulders.

Again, shrug shoulders up to ears as you raise the weight, and let them come down as you lower the weight.
[/quote]

As someone with a weak upper chest I have been following this thread, but this just does not sound good to me. I would take my chances with slight incline presses.
[/quote]
Have you tried Guillotine Presses with the Smith Machine as a finisher? Or
Incline DB with a slight touch of the bottoms of the db’s at the top. (Cue is imagine touching glass plates together, be gentle. Or
Pronated grip incline DB flies, ROM 8 to 11 and 5 to 1.
Just suggestions.

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]Vagina Whisperer wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:

I believe CT suggested that pressing movements should ideally go from vertical pressing to horizontal pressing… and I believe the reason was shoulder health. I don’t know the details, but I think that’s what he said.

Depending on how your actual split is structured, this could potentially be: overhead pressing → high incline → low incline → flat → decline.

Can anyone else comment on that? I don’t remember which article I read it in… but I don’t think I’m making it up.[/quote]

Please STOP! Your post would do more if you built an upper chest, then informed everyone how you did it. Your offering advice by PARROTING is wasteful! You are in still in the “ask questions phase” and should NOT offer advice until you can show from experience. ASK more questions and post LESS advice PLEASE!

REALLY! Are you going for some award for most post in a year? I mean every damn thread?
[/quote]
Dude, LoRez won’t stop, trust me. I’ve called him out elsewhere and he still has an answer for everything. He’s not so obnoxious as to be labeled a “troll” like the others, but I’m with you, if you don’t look awesome or have killer #'s you should be silent.
Awesome meme![/quote]

Ok.

But I was actually asking a question here.

99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?[/quote]
It does matter. Incline 1st. We are in the BB forum.

I don’t think I’ll ever understand pullovers for chest development. I feel them in my pec minor a bit, but no matter the variation, I feel them the most in my lats. I’m probably wrong considering how many people use them for chest.

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:
99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?[/quote]
It does matter. Incline 1st. We are in the BB forum.[/quote]

If you’re doing overhead press the same day too… would you do that before the incline?

(Personally, I’ve been doing overhead presses, flat presses, lateral raises, tricep work. If that should be changed up for whatever reason, I’d like to know.)

[quote]browndisaster wrote:
I don’t think I’ll ever understand pullovers for chest development. I feel them in my pec minor a bit, but no matter the variation, I feel them the most in my lats. I’m probably wrong considering how many people use them for chest.[/quote]

It’s all about the ROM you use. I’ve done pullovers with 2 DBs for a while now, and by using an abreviated movement (deep stretch, maybe 1/3-1/2 way up), you can get a great stress in your back. As far as using it for your pecs, I guess I can see how the other part of the ROM may come close to simulating a decline press in some ways, but I’ve never felt it works better than any of the more ‘bang for your buck’ chest exercises, and certainly wouldn’t recommend it as such.

S

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:
99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?[/quote]
It does matter. Incline 1st. We are in the BB forum.[/quote]

If you’re doing overhead press the same day too… would you do that before the incline?

(Personally, I’ve been doing overhead presses, flat presses, lateral raises, tricep work. If that should be changed up for whatever reason, I’d like to know.)[/quote]
I wouldn’t do OH press the same day as I bench. Your shoulders and tri’s are big part of your OHP and bench. Lifting in the order you state above seems counter productive. Your shoulders and tri’s are going to be smoked before you get to your chest. Some might say then that your pecs are going to have to work harder because of it, but in reality, your bench will suck. If you wanted to pre exhaust your pecs you’d do a bunch of cable flies before benching, not OHP.
Are we still in the BB forum?

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:
99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?[/quote]
It does matter. Incline 1st. We are in the BB forum.[/quote]

If you’re doing overhead press the same day too… would you do that before the incline?

(Personally, I’ve been doing overhead presses, flat presses, lateral raises, tricep work. If that should be changed up for whatever reason, I’d like to know.)[/quote]
I wouldn’t do OH press the same day as I bench. Your shoulders and tri’s are big part of your OHP and bench. Lifting in the order you state above seems counter productive. Your shoulders and tri’s are going to be smoked before you get to your chest. Some might say then that your pecs are going to have to work harder because of it, but in reality, your bench will suck. If you wanted to pre exhaust your pecs you’d do a bunch of cable flies before benching, not OHP.
Are we still in the BB forum?[/quote]

And… that exactly why I’m confused.

On the one hand: chest/shoulders/tris is the split, in that order
On the other hand: the vertical pressing before horizontal pressing suggestion

They don’t seem to fit together, unless I a) drop OHP altogether, or b) ignore that suggestion, or c) work shoulders on a different day

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]strangemeadow wrote:

[quote]LoRez wrote:
99% of the routines I’ve seen on this site have used incline press before flat… and I remembered CT said something like that too, from a shoulder health standpoint. When I saw someone say the reverse: “I do flat before incline”, I wanted affirmation on the vertical → horizontal thing.

Or does it even really matter?[/quote]
It does matter. Incline 1st. We are in the BB forum.[/quote]

If you’re doing overhead press the same day too… would you do that before the incline?

(Personally, I’ve been doing overhead presses, flat presses, lateral raises, tricep work. If that should be changed up for whatever reason, I’d like to know.)[/quote]
I wouldn’t do OH press the same day as I bench. Your shoulders and tri’s are big part of your OHP and bench. Lifting in the order you state above seems counter productive. Your shoulders and tri’s are going to be smoked before you get to your chest. Some might say then that your pecs are going to have to work harder because of it, but in reality, your bench will suck. If you wanted to pre exhaust your pecs you’d do a bunch of cable flies before benching, not OHP.
Are we still in the BB forum?[/quote]

And… that exactly why I’m confused.

On the one hand: chest/shoulders/tris is the split, in that order
On the other hand: the vertical pressing before horizontal pressing suggestion

They don’t seem to fit together, unless I a) drop OHP altogether, or b) ignore that suggestion, or c) work shoulders on a different day[/quote]

Do not drop OHP! I like option C.
That makes sense.

While on the topic of upper chest, is there anyway to fill in the dimple some people have between the shoulder and chest in the most muscular pose?