UN-Deadlift

Has anyone tried a deadlift with a rebound? For example start the deadlift with the bar on some uprights, much like a bench press. I figure more weight can be use, but the rebound (bounce) on the floor should be limited.

Has it already been tried and debunked?

There is a top down deadlift, where you start at the top and do a touch and go rep to the floor, and then there was also a device known as a “hopper” in the 20s that was based around bouncing a weight off the floor to bypass the sticking point and focus more on the lockout.

sounds risky, goodluck

I use the top-down deadlift because I have a disc injury and breaking the bar off the floor is hard on it. I can go about as heavy with the top-down as I could before the injury now. Only caveat is that I would strongly recommend not using a mixed grip (I use straps and double overhand) because it’s really hard not to bend the elbows when unracking and reracking and that’s a biceps tear waiting to happen.

I just wondered if anyone regularly performed a top-down deadlift. If so, how well it has worked for them.

Can’t really see this being beneficial for your deadlifts. Just deadlift. If you want to do something similar to a deadlift that starts with an eccentric, then do RDLs. If you want to handle more weight at lockout on the deadlift, do some reverse band DLs.

[quote]Rock978 wrote:
Can’t really see this being beneficial for your deadlifts. Just deadlift. If you want to do something similar to a deadlift that starts with an eccentric, then do RDLs. If you want to handle more weight at lockout on the deadlift, do some reverse band DLs.[/quote]

You really can’t see the benefit?

Hell, I perform all my reps touch and go, so it just seems like the next evolution to me. Why have a dichotomy when you can just do all movements and have more tools in your toolbox?

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Rock978 wrote:
Can’t really see this being beneficial for your deadlifts. Just deadlift. If you want to do something similar to a deadlift that starts with an eccentric, then do RDLs. If you want to handle more weight at lockout on the deadlift, do some reverse band DLs.[/quote]

You really can’t see the benefit?

Hell, I perform all my reps touch and go, so it just seems like the next evolution to me. Why have a dichotomy when you can just do all movements and have more tools in your toolbox?[/quote]

So because you do all your reps touch and go, you assume this has been beneficial and should be extrapolated further? Have you logged everything and taken a close enough look to see that touch and go is providing more benefits than actually performing the deadlift as you would in competition?

A deadlift preceded by an eccentric is simply a different lift than the deadlift. Many advocate strongly for only doing singles because of this. Others note that if doing more than singles, you should reset completely each time. Otherwise you’re not working on breaking the bar off the floor without an eccentric proceeding it.

Bottom line, no I don’t see the benefit. I’d be doing deficit DLs, banded or reverse band deadlifts, sumo deadlifts etc. before I ever thought about using this as a variation.

From Rip:

"A set of deadlifts should start at the floor, meaning that each rep begins and ends at the bottom, the back getting set and a new breath taken between reps while the bar is on the floor. Many people like to pull the first rep off of the floor, breathe at the top at lockout, and finish the set by bouncing the bar off the floor for the remaining reps. This is bad. It is easier to do the set this way, true, but easy and strong are usually opposing concepts. You need to develop the ability to set your back and control your position each time you pull the bar, because this uses precisely the skills and the muscles you are doing this exercise to develop. The point here, as is so often the case in the weight room, is not simply to do the deadlifts, but to get strong by doing deadlifts. They have to be done right, not just done.

. . .

“One of the key features of the deadlift is that it requires the production of force from a dead stop. . . . One of the reasons a heavy deadlift is so brutally hard is that it starts up out of the bottom without the benefit of the bounce that helps the squat change the direction of the force from down to up. Up to down without a bounce is quite a bit harder. If a bounce is incorporated into all the reps of a set of deadlifts except the first one, MUCH OF THE VALUE IN DOING THEM IS LOST.” (emphasis added.)

[quote]Rock978 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Rock978 wrote:
Can’t really see this being beneficial for your deadlifts. Just deadlift. If you want to do something similar to a deadlift that starts with an eccentric, then do RDLs. If you want to handle more weight at lockout on the deadlift, do some reverse band DLs.[/quote]

You really can’t see the benefit?

Hell, I perform all my reps touch and go, so it just seems like the next evolution to me. Why have a dichotomy when you can just do all movements and have more tools in your toolbox?[/quote]

So because you do all your reps touch and go, you assume this has been beneficial and should be extrapolated further? Have you logged everything and taken a close enough look to see that touch and go is providing more benefits than actually performing the deadlift as you would in competition?

A deadlift preceded by an eccentric is simply a different lift than the deadlift. Many advocate strongly for only doing singles because of this. Others note that if doing more than singles, you should reset completely each time. Otherwise you’re not working on breaking the bar off the floor without an eccentric proceeding it.

Bottom line, no I don’t see the benefit. I’d be doing deficit DLs, banded or reverse band deadlifts, sumo deadlifts etc. before I ever thought about using this as a variation. [/quote]

Considering I got my deadlift up to 601lbs in the 181lb weight class, I am unconcerned on if touch and go provides more benefits than deadstop, as what matters to me is that it provides benefits period. As long as something works, I don’t see a need to change it.

You have to think of these movements as deadlift builders, not the deadlift itself. Hell, I only deadlift once every 2 months, the rest of the time I pull ROM progression mat pulls touch and go, but my comp lift keeps going up. Next week, I am pulling 605 off the floor and shooting for a touch and go triple.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Rock978 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Rock978 wrote:
Can’t really see this being beneficial for your deadlifts. Just deadlift. If you want to do something similar to a deadlift that starts with an eccentric, then do RDLs. If you want to handle more weight at lockout on the deadlift, do some reverse band DLs.[/quote]

You really can’t see the benefit?

Hell, I perform all my reps touch and go, so it just seems like the next evolution to me. Why have a dichotomy when you can just do all movements and have more tools in your toolbox?[/quote]

So because you do all your reps touch and go, you assume this has been beneficial and should be extrapolated further? Have you logged everything and taken a close enough look to see that touch and go is providing more benefits than actually performing the deadlift as you would in competition?

A deadlift preceded by an eccentric is simply a different lift than the deadlift. Many advocate strongly for only doing singles because of this. Others note that if doing more than singles, you should reset completely each time. Otherwise you’re not working on breaking the bar off the floor without an eccentric proceeding it.

Bottom line, no I don’t see the benefit. I’d be doing deficit DLs, banded or reverse band deadlifts, sumo deadlifts etc. before I ever thought about using this as a variation. [/quote]

Considering I got my deadlift up to 601lbs in the 181lb weight class, I am unconcerned on if touch and go provides more benefits than deadstop, as what matters to me is that it provides benefits period. As long as something works, I don’t see a need to change it.

You have to think of these movements as deadlift builders, not the deadlift itself. Hell, I only deadlift once every 2 months, the rest of the time I pull ROM progression mat pulls touch and go, but my comp lift keeps going up. Next week, I am pulling 605 off the floor and shooting for a touch and go triple.[/quote]

I personally only program conventional deadlifts and perform all my reps deadstop, but I agree with what you are saying and you are obviously strong as all get-out. Many programs (Sheiko and Westside come to mind) don’t have you full ROM deadlifting often if ever.

I think OP needs to tell us 1) what he deadlifts currently, 2) what his program is, and 3) why he or she wants to do this style of DL.

I just wondered if anyone used the top down deadlift as an accessory to buildling their regulart deadlift. A lot of people tout using a dead bench to improve their BP, so I just wondered how well the opposite would work on the DL.

My best DL is 485 (conventional) at a BW of 230. I follow 5/3/1. I had planned to use the top-down DL as a Boring But Big (BBB) follow up. Hopefully, it will be up to 495 next month.

Punisher, I’ve watched some of your videos on ROM progression training.

[quote]Osmosis wrote:
I just wondered if anyone used the top down deadlift as an accessory to buildling their regulart deadlift. A lot of people tout using a dead bench to improve their BP, so I just wondered how well the opposite would work on the DL.

My best DL is 485 (conventional) at a BW of 230. I follow 5/3/1. I had planned to use the top-down DL as a Boring But Big (BBB) follow up. Hopefully, it will be up to 495 next month.

Punisher, I’ve watched some of your videos on ROM progression training.

[/quote]

I use top-down SLDL to floor or 4" box routinely. Also top-down extended ROM RDL. Nice for variety but I wouldn’t swear by them or anything.

[quote]Osmosis wrote:
I just wondered if anyone used the top down deadlift as an accessory to buildling their regulart deadlift. A lot of people tout using a dead bench to improve their BP, so I just wondered how well the opposite would work on the DL.

My best DL is 485 (conventional) at a BW of 230. I follow 5/3/1. I had planned to use the top-down DL as a Boring But Big (BBB) follow up. Hopefully, it will be up to 495 next month.

Punisher, I’ve watched some of your videos on ROM progression training.

[/quote]

5/3/1. Awesome. I see, I would program them as an accessory, too, so it sounds like you are already on the right track.

Long Answer:
It may or may not work for you. The better question is – why do you want to do this? Usually when something “works for someone” it means that that movement builds upon a specific weakness that they have. Most things will work for someone, for example look at ThePunisher’s insane deadlift. But also read in to Rock’s criticism. Neither are wrong, both are speaking from their personal experiences.

Not to derail you here, but at least in my experience, the strongest guys look critically at their weaknesses when picking accessory lifts and look to boost those; rather than almost arbitrarily picking one and going with it.

Short Answer
At least 1 person thinks this method has worked for them (which is the answer to your question). Try it for 4 weeks as an assistance movement and if it doesn’t help pitch it.

we have a master Max Bristow, Max is M/70 and deads around 230 raw in the 66kgs…

have seen video of Max training, doing hopper deads… he uses a Ol bar with a car wheels and tire on each end… works well…

thing is it is only part of what he does, and he is a triple bwt++++ dler at 70…

he did not do them to get that way …

with a dead like yours there are easier less stressful ways to build your dead

Scott Yard on EFS has implemented this and felt it helped him: articles.elitefts.com/training-articles/powerlifting-articles/a-peaking-cycle-for-a-raw-stalling-deadlift/

these are pros and strong lifters looking for an edge, they did not get strong this way, it’s like trying to run before you can walk,goodluck

[quote]AnytimeJake wrote:
these are pros and strong lifters looking for an edge, they did not get strong this way, it’s like trying to run before you can walk,goodluck[/quote]

What?

To prove I am good on my word