T Nation

Ulnar Nerve..

In order to avoid/correct a push/pull imbalance i focus alot of my training on rows and vertical pulls.

However, it seems that after (sometimes immediately, sometimes the next day) i do back work, ie pulling. I get a a trigger point of sorts near my shoulder blade, what seems like referred pain in my front deltoid and what i can only assume is an entrapment of sorts with my ulnar nerve (weakness and clawing of little and ring fingers).

These symptoms are almost, if not exclusively, on my left side. When I refrain from back work these problems go away but since I one needs to hit the posterior how should i go about addressing these issues?

Try ART.

Try to work out the trigger point by self-trigger-point therapy with a wall and tennis ball or TheraCane. Claire Davies’ Trigger Point Therapy Manual is well worth the money.

Also, do tennis ball/foam roller soft tissue work on your back before lifting.

In my experience, back work in the gym will not correct postural imbalances or many mobility issues if they exist (and they probably do). These have to be addressed before you lift. For example, I used to have rounded shoulders (internally rotated) and tried to do rear delt work to correct them; it didn’t work. Instead, look at Pete Egoscue’s Pain Free book and Cressey and Robertson’s articles/locker room threads/DVDs.

[quote]andersons wrote:
Try to work out the trigger point by self-trigger-point therapy with a wall and tennis ball or TheraCane. Claire Davies’ Trigger Point Therapy Manual is well worth the money.

Also, do tennis ball/foam roller soft tissue work on your back before lifting.

In my experience, back work in the gym will not correct postural imbalances or many mobility issues if they exist (and they probably do). These have to be addressed before you lift. For example, I used to have rounded shoulders (internally rotated) and tried to do rear delt work to correct them; it didn’t work. Instead, look at Pete Egoscue’s Pain Free book and Cressey and Robertson’s articles/locker room threads/DVDs.[/quote]

Thanks a bunch. It seems i am going about correcting my posture the same way you were and, apparently, with the same results (or lack therefore). I too have rounded shoulders (i think all the pull ups i have done over the years has not helped either) and a slightly kyphotic curve in my thoracic spine. From everything i have researched i thought if i just worked my back it would all fall into place but the more i hit the gym the more i see this is not the case. I do the trigger point stuff on the wall and love it and also have MM and one of Egosque’s other book. I will pick up the one you mentioned and also I/O. I guess in the end i always wonder at what point is one be deemed “fit” enough(posturally) to safely lift weights?

How do i gauge this? The one thing that seems to help my posture is the following routine: Thoracic extensions on a foan roller followed by shoulder dislocates and then push ups with my hands low and scapula depressed and retracted. I am starting to think i should just continue this rotuine and continue to work the lower with squat and dead variations. But still, i wonder WHEN i will be able to lift without causing postural imbalnces.