T Nation

Tyson/Coleman..Voices

I have recently been wondering about a possible connection between voice pitch and size potential.

Take tyson and coleman as an example…very high pitched. Is this just coincidence?

consider that at 13 tyson was approximately 100kg’s.

Also I was wondering if anyone has ever come across sample weights workouts of tyson or anything similar.

Any information on diet would be great also.

lol?

I want to see Tyson training with weights as well…I’m guessing he was pretty strong.

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How so dude? considering the size of coleman and what an incredible physical speciman tyson was…I think its a valid observation. I’m not saying there is a link just curious.

[quote]OMC wrote:
I have recently been wondering about a possible connection between voice pitch and size potential.

Take tyson and coleman as an example…very high pitched. Is this just coincidence?

consider that at 13 tyson was approximately 100kg’s. [/quote]
I remember reading an article that attributed Tyson’s voice to the child abuse he endured. So the voice is more psychological more than physiological.

No idea about Coleman. Jay Cutler, Dorian were gigantic and they didn’t have voices like Coleman.

Have been looking for an example of a weights programme he did etc for years but no luck. I do think however that he benched something like 245Ibs when he was 13. Considering his size back then I suppose he might be a pure example of kick ass genetics.

OMC

[quote]GETSTRENGTH wrote:
I want to see Tyson training with weights as well…I’m guessing he was pretty strong.

[/quote]

WOW!!! I’m not drawing any conclusions, my friend, simply making an observation. Thanks for the opinion though … I see what your saying.

OMC

[quote]Mick28 wrote:

Please don’t post anymore stuff like this.

"Correlation and Causation
We must be very careful in interpreting correlation coefficients. Just because two variables are highly correlated does not mean that one causes the other. In statistical terms, we say that correlation does not imply causation. There are many good examples of correlation which are nonsensical when interpreted in terms of causation.

Ice cream sales and the number of shark attacks on swimmers are correlated.
Skirt lengths and stock prices are highly correlated (as stock prices go up, skirt lengths get shorter)
The number of cavities in elementary school children and vocabulary size have a strong positive correlation.

Three relationships which can be taken (or mistaken) for causation are:

Causation: Changes in X cause changes in Y. For example, football weekends cause heavier traffic, more food sales, etc.

Common response: Both X and Y respond to changes in some unobserved variable. All three of our examples are examples of common response.

Ice cream sales and shark attacks both increase during summer.

Skirt lengths and stock prices are both controlled by the general attitude of the country, liberal or conservative.
The number of cavities and children’s vocabulary are both related to a child’s age.

Confounding: The effect of X on Y is hopelessly mixed up with the effects of other explanatory variables on y. For example, if we are studying the effects of Tylenol on reducing pain, and we give a group of pain-sufferers Tylenol and record how much their pain is reduced, we are confounding the effect of giving them Tylenol with giving them any pill.

Many people report a reduction in pain by simply being given a sugar pill with no medication in it at all, this is called the placebo effect. To establish causation, a designed experiment must be run."
[/quote]

what about that Deebo character off of the Friday films? Big dude, deep voice!

Bobby Lashley, big guy, ‘softly spoken’