Trouble Sleeping?

I ran into this a few years ago and thought I’d share it.

The brain functions at a certain “wavelength” depending on how awake it is. For sleep, it’s about 1.5-5Hz, dreaming sleep being 4-5Hz.

Anyway, the brain has been found to “adapt” to external stimuli, such as sound. The point is, you can use a computer program to make binaural sound output which will gradually bring the brain into the desired state.

I thought it was BS, but i’ve personally never stayed awake throughout the 20-minute sleep-inducement sound, so it must work.

There are several programs floating around. The one I found was BrainWave Generator, which you can find on www.bwgen.com

You could hypothetically use it to induce theta waves as in deep sleep during which growth hormone is released. Until there’s some evidence though, it’s out there in sci-fi land.

"The brain functions at a certain “wavelength” depending on how awake it is. For sleep, it’s about 1.5-5Hz, dreaming sleep being 4-5Hz.

Anyway, the brain has been found to “adapt” to external stimuli, such as sound. The point is, you can use a computer program to make binaural sound output which will gradually bring the brain into the desired state."

The thing I’m wondering is what type of speaker did you use to produce 1-5 Hz at a reasonable level!

Neil

I have trouble sleeping naturally, and no matter what I do, I suck at sleeping. I just can’t fall asleep. Then, when I do, I can’t sleep in. It’s ridiculous. I’m glad I’m a grad student that can make his own hours. If I can sleep in, then I’ll do it and just go in later.

Neil G, he’s talking about brain wave activity, not soundwaves. You don’t need a soundwave of 1-5hz to produce a brainwave of this frequency. Actually, I don’t think it is possible to produce a sound at that low a frequency?

loopfit,

I guess I misunderstood. He mentioned the frequencies and then how the brain can respond to sound to help sleep. I just assumed the 1-5 Hz was the sound that was used. So what is the frequency being used?

Yes, it is possible to reproduce 1-5Hz, but even very powerful systems would have trouble reproducing it at any kind of level without a lot of distortion. It depends on the levels required if we say this is the frequency used to induce sleep. But even producing it at 40 dB would require a substantial system and it would HAVE to be expensive otherwise you would get a lot of distortion and harmonics, so you would hear higher tones and you might hear chuffing and flapping of the woofer. Not to mention if it was low in distortion and at a decent level, things would be vibrating a lot without even hearing the sound causing it :slight_smile:

Cool post. I just remember that really really low frequencey sound waves can stop your heart! Hahaha. I’m guessing very special speakers are needed for this. :wink:

NeilG, are you an audiophile? Used to be one of my passions.

This is an important point i’d like to mention for you lazy types (it’s on the website):

It’s working as a “binaural” pulse, which means you should use pretty good headphones, jacked up to either your computer or to a burned CD or high-quality MP3/minidisc.

Anyway, you don’t have to produce the actual frequency! The difference in the frequency between the two ears makes your brain create an imaginary “third” frequency, which will roughly be equal to the difference of the two frequencies.

Yeah, you could create beats, but that means you have to wear headphones! I dunno, headphones in bed drive me NUTS.

Hey, I just started a “wakign up” thread on off-topic!

I’m going to try that low frequency thing, thanks for the idea!