T Nation

Tricep Work for Bench

Anybody have suggestions as to which tricep exercises are best for bench assistance? I was thinking close grip bench and maybe some skull crushers… any ideas?

[quote]CSEagles1694 wrote:
close grip bench[/quote]

JM Press is also supposed to be a tried and true tricep exercise

paused board press

dips unless you have major shoulder issues

Close grip bench, JM press (works wonders), and pin press/board press from varying heights.

JM press
Tate press (or elbows out extensions or whatever you want to call them)
Rolling tricep extensions
Reverse grip bench
Close grip bench
Board press

If I had to pick a favorite it would probably be JM press but I think all of the above compliment the bench in a good way.

what reps, sets do you guys like for assistance lifts?

[quote]totti13 wrote:
what reps, sets do you guys like for assistance lifts?[/quote]

For Close grip bench, I go as low as 5 reps. For the more extension based exercises, i go no lower than 8 and no higher than 12.

As my JM’s go up, my bench goes up. Other good ones: high reps benches, chain bench, 2-4 boards, anything but a tricep iso exercise.

I either go high reps, up to 100 or go for a 6 rep max. My best 6 on JMs is 280lbs. That sucked.

dips and close grip, if neither of those work well for you then try skull crushers

ok so JM press seems to be the common denominator here… thanks guys

I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.

bench press with mini bands doubled up (and everything else that has been mentioned except JM press…never tried them)

[quote]anom1k wrote:
I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.[/quote]

your coaches idea on being against board presses is based on the fact that as a Raw lifter, more emphasis needs to be placed on the bottom portion of the lift in 99.9% of cases rather than the top portion. Further Strengthening the top portion of the lift will just continue to leave the bottom portion in the dust.

I always liked a nice 3-4 board press to really hit the tris as well as prepping the entire system for handling and getting used to the heavier weight in the hands.

[quote]Chap Manly wrote:

[quote]anom1k wrote:
I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.[/quote]

your coaches idea on being against board presses is based on the fact that as a Raw lifter, more emphasis needs to be placed on the bottom portion of the lift in 99.9% of cases rather than the top portion. Further Strengthening the top portion of the lift will just continue to leave the bottom portion in the dust.[/quote]

Yeah that is what I figured, my sticking point is usually an inch or two off my chest.

[quote]anom1k wrote:

[quote]Chap Manly wrote:

[quote]anom1k wrote:
I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.[/quote]

I found pin presses to work great for that, however they damages tendons in my arms and after a while caused serious pain. So Floor presses should be your best friend.

your coaches idea on being against board presses is based on the fact that as a Raw lifter, more emphasis needs to be placed on the bottom portion of the lift in 99.9% of cases rather than the top portion. Further Strengthening the top portion of the lift will just continue to leave the bottom portion in the dust.[/quote]

Yeah that is what I figured, my sticking point is usually an inch or two off my chest.[/quote]

[quote]anom1k wrote:

[quote]Chap Manly wrote:

[quote]anom1k wrote:
I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.[/quote]

your coaches idea on being against board presses is based on the fact that as a Raw lifter, more emphasis needs to be placed on the bottom portion of the lift in 99.9% of cases rather than the top portion. Further Strengthening the top portion of the lift will just continue to leave the bottom portion in the dust.[/quote]

Yeah that is what I figured, my sticking point is usually an inch or two off my chest.[/quote]

if your sticking point is there, you’re likely lacking upper back strength and possibly shoulders. 1-2 board press and military press help quite a bit. regardless, tricep strength will still help you.

[quote]HERC410 wrote:

[quote]anom1k wrote:

[quote]Chap Manly wrote:

[quote]anom1k wrote:
I am glad this was posted because my “coach” was telling me to do more triceps work to make my bench go up. He has expressed some skepticism to me about board presses for the raw lifter, but one of my current training partners who is a very high caliber lifter swears by them, though he competes in single ply. My training partner argues that board presses get you used to lifting heavier weights (CNS), while my coach argues that they are unnecessary and perhaps counter productive for the raw lifter (strength curve of lift is different).

I’d love some thoughts on this.[/quote]

your coaches idea on being against board presses is based on the fact that as a Raw lifter, more emphasis needs to be placed on the bottom portion of the lift in 99.9% of cases rather than the top portion. Further Strengthening the top portion of the lift will just continue to leave the bottom portion in the dust.[/quote]

Yeah that is what I figured, my sticking point is usually an inch or two off my chest.[/quote]

if your sticking point is there, you’re likely lacking upper back strength and possibly shoulders. 1-2 board press and military press help quite a bit. regardless, tricep strength will still help you.[/quote]

That is a good insight, and I haven’t done military presses since before I started powerlifting. I definitely do kroc rows and chins though, so I am not short on my back work. I might look into using a military press as a ME exercise for a month or two and see what happens.