T Nation

Trending Lift Numbers

Alright here is what I want to do. I log my sets/reps into Excel and I would like to have a graph trending the numbers. What I need is to how to create a way to assign a base value to rate each set to compare to others.

I have seen a 1RM max calculator should I just use that as rough estimate then trend based off that?

You want to “assign a base value to rate each set to compare to others”.

Please explain what your criteria of rating will be?

Why?

How about just adding more weight to the bar and more food to the plate every week?

Can it all be so simple? Clearly not.

[quote]Travacolypse wrote:
Why?

How about just adding more weight to the bar and more food to the plate every week?

Can it all be so simple? Clearly not.[/quote]

Never!

That works?

You mean I don’t need to fit my marginal increases in calories on a log normal graph and then use Bayes’ Law to evaluate my likelihood of success?

Dayhum.

[quote]Travacolypse wrote:
Why?

How about just adding more …food to the plate every week?

[/quote]

If you can do that successfully, my hat is off to you.

[quote]
Please explain what your criteria of rating will be? [/quote]
That is more or less the point of this thread. I want (if possible) a formula to take reps with weight and assign a value to it that would help a comparison between a different weight with different reps.

Let’s see in the book NROL for the hypertrophy section he jumps around in reps/weight from session to session. So the point is to determine if I am still moving up even though I am doing more reps with less weight.

The inner report analyst in me likes to see it in on a graph.

Please explain to me why food intake as anything to do with this.

[quote]yasser wrote:

Please explain what your criteria of rating will be?
That is more or less the point of this thread. I want (if possible) a formula to take reps with weight and assign a value to it that would help a comparison between a different weight with different reps.

[/quote]

You are still being far to vague. From a mathematical point of view it’s possible but you wouldn’t be able to just have a base rating comparing exercises that use different body parts. (Not if you’re wanting to base this rating on weight shifted).

You could try;

C*([A1X1+A2X2+…+AnXn]/BW)

Where C is the Coefficient of Muscle Recruitment (Deadlifts = 80%, Curls 30% for example).

Ai is the Weight Used
Xi is the Number of Reps.

BW is your body weight.

This is just from a mathematical point of view.

Otherwise, just use total volume.
Apart from having a bit of excel fun, this seems like a pointless idea. But that’s just my opinion.

[quote]
you wouldn’t be able to just have a base rating comparing exercises that use different body parts.[/quote]
No, not trying to compare different bodyparts. Just how does a Bench Press 10@225 compare to Bench Press 3@275.

Possibly. Was just hoping to find a nice way to estimate the number without having to wait to circle around to the same rep scheme, or doing max testing.

[quote]yasser wrote:

you wouldn’t be able to just have a base rating comparing exercises that use different body parts.
No, not trying to compare different bodyparts. Just how does a Bench Press 10@225 compare to Bench Press 3@275.

Apart from having a bit of excel fun, this seems like a pointless idea. But that’s just my opinion.
Possibly. Was just hoping to find a nice way to estimate the number without having to wait to circle around to the same rep scheme, or doing max testing.
[/quote]

Pointless. No equation can quantify quality of those reps which is a large factor as well. This isn’t just a numbers game. This is biology.

[quote]Otep wrote:
Travacolypse wrote:
Why?

How about just adding more …food to the plate every week?

If you can do that successfully, my hat is off to you.[/quote]

Your hat must be “off” for a lot of people because the majority of the big guys you see in magazines gained most of their size keeping it that simple…until thy hire Charles Glass.

My PL total is modeled by the equation TOTAL = e^d, where d is the number of days I’ve been training. I became elite after 5 days of training, and on day 627, I will be able to bench press pluto for reps

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Otep wrote:
Travacolypse wrote:
Why?

How about just adding more …food to the plate every week?

If you can do that successfully, my hat is off to you.

Your hat must be “off” for a lot of people because the majority of the big guys you see in magazines gained most of their size keeping it that simple…until thy hire Charles Glass.[/quote]

I somehow doubt it was that linear a system.

[quote]Otep wrote:
Professor X wrote:
Otep wrote:
Travacolypse wrote:
Why?

How about just adding more …food to the plate every week?

If you can do that successfully, my hat is off to you.

Your hat must be “off” for a lot of people because the majority of the big guys you see in magazines gained most of their size keeping it that simple…until thy hire Charles Glass.

I somehow doubt it was that linear a system.[/quote]

More food, more weight. As complicated as you may try to make it, it can never leave that basic concept.

[quote]yasser wrote:
Alright here is what I want to do. I log my sets/reps into Excel and I would like to have a graph trending the numbers. What I need is to how to create a way to assign a base value to rate each set to compare to others.

I have seen a 1RM max calculator should I just use that as rough estimate then trend based off that?

[/quote]

That’s a cute helmet you have on.

Thought I would ask in case it was a possibility.

thanks…?

[quote]yasser wrote:

Please explain what your criteria of rating will be?
That is more or less the point of this thread. I want (if possible) a formula to take reps with weight and assign a value to it that would help a comparison between a different weight with different reps.

How about just adding more weight to the bar

Let’s see in the book NROL for the hypertrophy section he jumps around in reps/weight from session to session. So the point is to determine if I am still moving up even though I am doing more reps with less weight.

Can it all be so simple? Clearly not.

The inner report analyst in me likes to see it in on a graph.

and more food to the plate every week?
Please explain to me why food intake as anything to do with this.

[/quote]

Graphs are awesome, but you’re probably wasting your time. I used to like to log my reps/sets/food intake/bowel movements in a huge excel file, then I stopped – it was a huge waste of time. I made more progress strength and weight-wise once I stopped trying to make it something it’s not.

I perform complex assessments all day long for a living, so I don’t want to spend even more of my time overthinking simple activities. If you want to OCD the shit out of things, sweet, but my point is: you don’t need to.

When your 1rm turns into your 3rm turns into your 5rm, you’ve made progress. You don’t need to gear up some equation to compare lifts.

…a graph just looks cooler, DUH

[quote]yasser wrote:

Please explain what your criteria of rating will be?
That is more or less the point of this thread. I want (if possible) a formula to take reps with weight and assign a value to it that would help a comparison between a different weight with different reps.

How about just adding more weight to the bar

Let’s see in the book NROL for the hypertrophy section he jumps around in reps/weight from session to session. So the point is to determine if I am still moving up even though I am doing more reps with less weight.

Can it all be so simple? Clearly not.

The inner report analyst in me likes to see it in on a graph.

and more food to the plate every week?
Please explain to me why food intake as anything to do with this.

[/quote]

Training in different rep ranges trains different strength qualities, or at least alters different strength qualities in varying proportions to one another. As a result, the exact relationship between your, for example, 3 rep max and 10 rep max will not be constant.

The thing you have to remember about those x-rep max calculators is that they’re very rough estimates and the margins of error are large enough to make your whole attempt at gauging progress in finer increments than you are now pretty hopeless. To even come up with a reasonably approximated curve for yourself comparing reps/weights would require a ton of data, given that that data would contain so much noise.

So in short, if you want to make a graph to track your progress in the long run, well after the fact, then have at it. If you want to track progress more precisely from day to day or week to week, well then this probably isn’t going to be any more fruitful than a pen and paper log like the rest of us use.

Some of you guys make this way more complicated then it needs to be.

calculate the force per rep based on mass, time, and distance (assuming every rep is done at the same speed/velocity and the same starting/stopping point) Then calculate the work done per rep/set.