T Nation

Traps/Shoulders Drastic Imbalance


#1

The subject pretty much says it all. I've been working out for a little over a year. I am currently doing a Waterbury workout routine. I try to always stay in proper form, and I never consciously use one arm more than the other.. .

However, there is a very noticible difference in size between my two traps/shoulders. (one droops down from my neck while the other one makes almost straight line.) my friends always point it out to me as it's getting annoying.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Ivan

PS: I measured my two arms, and one is longer than the other. ,...would this have an effect at all?


#2

Do you sling a backpack during the day?


#3

Did you have an injury on one side?
I've injured my left shoulder (rotator cuff and AC joint) and it's noticably bigger. I also notice i tend to really lean on the left side when sitting on a couch (bad posture obviously but probaly an extra workout in itself lol).
Maybe switch to dumbbells for a while to identify a possibly weakness between the 2 sides.
All the best with it anyway.


#4

pictures?

lifting videos?

how much longer is the long arm?

any injuries?

accdents?

separated shoulder?

scoliosis?

ever seen a doctor about it?

try some unilateral movements:
db press (bench, overhead, etc)
low cable row
lateral raise
bent lateral raise
etc ...
focus on perfect form and note discrepancies

ask Cressey, Robertson, Staley, Smith

see a doctor!

just a few thoughts ...

Dan


#5

no back pack or injuries. I do have scoliosis. Pics will be up soon. thanks for your responses.


#6

I am very interested in this topic because I also have this imbalance and have scoliosis(spelling?) as well.


#7

Scoliosis can lead to imbalances in your physique, especially in the shoulders. Most people have a natural tendancy to favor one side over the other and in folks with pronounces scoliosis this imbalance can become pretty pronounced. Aside from the standard treatments for scoliosis, you might want to emphasis unilateral excercises and work the lagging side a little harder than your 'strong side.' Like when doing overhead presses, do them with dumbells instead of a barbell and maybe try to squeeze out an extra rep or two on the weaker side.

I have a very mild case of scoliosis and one shoulder was noticably higher and larger than the other before I strated training. Over the years, good posture and solid training have pretty much eavened things out. Also, while symetry is important, the two sides of your body are not, and never will be identical to each other so to create the illusion of symetry you might have play around with different routines, assuming that's even important to you.