T Nation

Transferring Strength into a New Exercise


#1

So I've finally decided to start doing the bench press (after 2 years of training). What is the best way to introduce a new compound movement if I'm already relatively strong in other forms of pressing?
For example, this week I did an easy 5x3 of push press with my BW on the bar and 4 weeks ago I got my 1RM in dips with an added 77% of my BW attached on a belt. However, when I try a bench press with my BW on the bar, it feels so heavy that I barely get 3 nice looking reps.

What would be the best frequency and progression to transfer the pressing strength into this new exercise without hitting an early plateau due to over-reaching or not doing enough work? I'm prepared to be very patient with this, but honestly have no idea how to do this right.


#2

[quote]SirValeq wrote:
So I’ve finally decided to start doing the bench press (after 2 years of training). What is the best way to introduce a new compound movement if I’m already relatively strong in other forms of pressing?
For example, this week I did an easy 5x3 of push press with my BW on the bar and 4 weeks ago I got my 1RM in dips with an added 77% of my BW attached on a belt. However, when I try a bench press with my BW on the bar, it feels so heavy that I barely get 3 nice looking reps.

What would be the best frequency and progression to transfer the pressing strength into this new exercise without hitting an early plateau due to over-reaching or not doing enough work? I’m prepared to be very patient with this, but honestly have no idea how to do this right.[/quote]

If your pressing muscles are strong then it’s only a matter of getting used to the movement which requires high frequency training.

However let me say this:

  1. push pressing bodyweight isn’t huge, I wouldn’t qualify it as “strong”. It’s not bad, but certainly not strong enough to expect dominance over other pressing movement. STRICT overhead pressing bodyweight is pretty good. Still not super strong, but decent enough to expect to be strong on most other pressing movements.

  2. The dip doesn’t seem to transfer that well to the bench press. Some people just have great mechanics to dip. Biotest CEO Tim Patterson is one of the strongest dipper I know, the guy literally has no limit on his dips… he can DESTROY me on dips. But I’m stronger on the bench press.

Both the dip and push press fail to strengthen the beginning/bottom portion of the bench press. So even if you are very strong to finish the movement, if you are weak of the start there is no way you can bench press heavy.


#3

@CT

Oftentimes your strength level (how strong you are ) is depending on your relative strength (bodyweightâ?? lift). For example a strict overheard press with your own bodyweight is strong (according to you). However do you also have some numbers, where you think no matter how heavy the athlete is that was extremely strong, or strong? For example for me a 400kg deadlift is always extremely strong , no matter if the lifter is 100kg or 200kg

@sir
The bench press is a very technical lift ( at least powerlifting style) so I would say focus on technique!! Also start your workout with the bench press and start light. Leave reps in your tank and focus on technique.