T Nation

Transcending All Barriers

I’ve personally experienced the incredibly powerful, effective and efficient results of performance based training. I use the phrase “performance training” because its probably the most familiar title for most. I, undoubtedly know its much deeper than what it appears on the surface. I’ve learned this through many years of my own training in athletics, but more recently found this philosophy (as a way of thinking) to have the same powerful training effects in all areas of bodybuilding, men and women’s physique, and women’s figure and bikini.

In fact, it’s more profound in this area because the effects can be quantified through a visual change in aesthetics. The differentiating factor being a structured and consistent nutrition plan. If one understands how to effectively structure their nutrition, it will SUPPORT their current training approach, as well as prepare them for the physical effects of their training to be seen after that specific training phase is complete. It should also prepare them to transition to the next phase of training and not lose any of the positive momentum they’ve built prior.

There are 3 other aspects of a performance based training approach that are rarely recognized as a direct result of training in this fashion.

  1. The physical look one develops—powerful, healthy, dense muscle and more depth at every angle. You know it when you see it. It’s definitely unique.

  2. Natural and very intuitive–once you become aware of the distinct signs of optimal training within, it becomes much easier to regulate the intensity and volume within individual workouts which will naturally regulate the bigger picture of the current training phase.

  3. “Neural Memory” The term muscle memory has been around for decades. The associated effect of this main stream phrase is “real and valid” but, it’s preceded by the nervous system “remembering” how to signal the muscles. High performance movement requires neural efficiency. Performance based training develops a very high level of this. If done for long enough, it establishes a foundation the body can call upon after a period of time off. Even fairly long periods of time.

The sooner you can attain a highly efficient working state in the body, the sooner the desired training effect can be reached. I have experienced this a few times due to injury. Speaking of injuries, one will recover and get back to full speed sooner, when the nervous system is operating at full speed.

I’ll post two very profound “case studies” I have done with two personal coaching clients over the last 7 months. One is a bodybuilder with a few competitions under his belt. The second is a men’s physique competitor that is very new to competing. Two different physique goals, using very similar training methods to achieve the aesthetic look desired. The changes along the way and the end result are truly incredible.

Nice to hear from ya big man! Always interested in hearing what you’re up to with your approach to training, nutrition, and especially with your and your clients’ personal experiences and results.

S

OMG, dat avatar!
Post moar pleeeeeeease!

[quote]John Schlecht wrote:

I’ll post two very profound “case studies” I have done with two personal coaching clients over the last 7 months. One is a bodybuilder with a few competitions under his belt. The second is a men’s physique competitor that is very new to competing. Two different physique goals, using very similar training methods to achieve the aesthetic look desired. The changes along the way and the end result are truly incredible. [/quote]

Excited about this.

Glad to see ya posting again.

<----- Is looking forward to this thread.

I thought you’re just supposed to lift on hammer strength machines??? lol

But glad to have you back synergy.

i am intrigued (._. )

Listening.

tweet

WOW

I’m going to sound like an idiot, I’m sure, but what is, “performance training?”

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:
I’m going to sound like an idiot, I’m sure, but what is, “performance training?”

[/quote]

Training to increase performance, speed, strength, power, mobility etc rather than chasing a pump or volume. Most of CT’s style of training is ‘performance’ training.

The big man is back! /subscribed

[quote]Waittz wrote:

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:
I’m going to sound like an idiot, I’m sure, but what is, “performance training?”

[/quote]

Training to increase performance, speed, strength, power, mobility etc rather than chasing a pump or volume. Most of CT’s style of training is ‘performance’ training.

The big man is back! /subscribed [/quote]

I guess the terminology is confusing to me. So Olympic lifting is performance lifting, correct? Or is it sport specific lifting?

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:

[quote]Waittz wrote:

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:
I’m going to sound like an idiot, I’m sure, but what is, “performance training?”

[/quote]

Training to increase performance, speed, strength, power, mobility etc rather than chasing a pump or volume. Most of CT’s style of training is ‘performance’ training.

The big man is back! /subscribed [/quote]

I guess the terminology is confusing to me. So Olympic lifting is performance lifting, correct? Or is it sport specific lifting?

[/quote]

you are overcomplicating it. He is mainly just refering to training chasing increased performance. An Oly lift is like a tool in a tool box. If has multiple uses depending on what you are trying to build. Check out his sticky in the bodybuilding forum. Has tons of videos and cool stuff about his training. John used to go by the moniker Syngery or something like that.

[quote]Waittz wrote:

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:

[quote]Waittz wrote:

[quote]usmccds423 wrote:
I’m going to sound like an idiot, I’m sure, but what is, “performance training?”

[/quote]

Training to increase performance, speed, strength, power, mobility etc rather than chasing a pump or volume. Most of CT’s style of training is ‘performance’ training.

The big man is back! /subscribed [/quote]

I guess the terminology is confusing to me. So Olympic lifting is performance lifting, correct? Or is it sport specific lifting?

[/quote]

you are overcomplicating it. He is mainly just refering to training chasing increased performance. An Oly lift is like a tool in a tool box. If has multiple uses depending on what you are trying to build. Check out his sticky in the bodybuilding forum. Has tons of videos and cool stuff about his training. John used to go by the moniker Syngery or something like that. [/quote]

I’ll check the sticky out, thanks!

So good to see you posting on here again, John. Can’t wait to see what’s to come!

I have been drifting towards this method of training for a while now. I believe that when you chase performance, aesthetics will follow. I’m very interested to see how this thread goes.

Before I continue, I want to be clear about what performance training means to me.

Performance training is a systematic, but flexible progression of varying methods implemented to achieve a specific performance and/or body composition goal, based on the innate physiological, psychological and mechanical principles our bodies are naturally governed by.

In other words, instead of relying solely on external cues and defined parameters to guide our training, we allow the internal cues and intuitive parameters within to regulate how we train.

Of course, there needs to be an external reference such as a training program or training goal for us to gauge our internal cues effectively.

The key element that must always be present in performance based training is without a doubt, is your psychological awareness of where your body is within each rep. That’s as far as you can truly go, if you expect a positive effect of each workout and each training phase overall. We naturally quantify things in order for us to understand the task at hand, as well as provide a method of measurement and feedback to identify progress. The main problem with this, is that it’s 100% based on intellectual criteria (how many reps or how much weight) our physical bodies cannot understand. In reality, it’s the exact opposite process that our bodies are designed to operate most efficiently within.

Example:
Set goal is to perform 8 reps using an appropriate weight and solid technique.
We tell ourselves this and start banging out reps. Somewhere within the set we reaffirm that hard 8 rep figure in our minds and continue striving for it. What most don’t recognize is that while we have our minds set on doing 8 reps, it prevents us from gaining the maximum benefit of each rep we complete. Basically we go into a form of auto pilot until the last rep or two is upon us simply because that number 8 was where our conscious effort was focused, not only from the first rep, but in the moments preceding the start of the set. This is also a way to automatically limit performance and diminish the positive effects of the movement. Your mind decided when the set was finished, regardless of what your body was capable of at the time.

Using this isolated example, you can see that for this particular set, the physiological aspect was basically eliminated from the experience. What should have happened was you begin the set with 8 reps as a flexible target. Then you immerse yourself in the moment to moment flow of each rep, which will allow your body to INTUITIVELY determine the stopping point of that set. Maybe it signals 6 reps is enough or maybe to your surprise you can pump out a few extra and end up nailing 11 solid reps. Either way, you hit the sweet spot of physical demand your body is capable of handling without exceeding your capabilities for that specific set and movement.

Once you understand this and apply it to your workout as a whole AND your training week as a whole, you end up training the optimal amount to stimulate the adaptation process to improve across the board physically, without exceeding your capacity to recover from your training.

I’m going to stop with that because it’s critical to fully understand this concept. It’s not only critical to performance based training, but to all forms of training, no matter what you title them—hypertrophy based, High Intensity Training, High Volume Training, whatever. It doesn’t matter the label we use, the underlying physiological process is the exact same regardless of the method of training you’re using. Why? Because whether we recognize it or not, our bodies (especially our nervous system) will determine the what we are able to do on any given day.

Instead of fighting that, learn to embrace it and work with it. Drop all definitions, labels and associations you have been told are the “best” or “only way” of doing things. Take it upon yourself to be your own teacher and make your own decisions as to what works best for you within a structure of training aimed at the specific training effect and goal you desire to achieve.

Learn to listen to your body, it’s a language unique only to you, and it will never lie to you. Trust in that and you will achieve whatever it is you seek with your training.

You’re starting to remind me of Scott Abel.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
You’re starting to remind me of Scott Abel.[/quote]

Haha I was thinking the same… Not saying its a bad thing though… not necessarily.

And what exactly does it mean to be reminded of him? I’m curious to know.