T Nation

Trans Fat and Cheese

I know that when oils are cooked at high temperatures their molecular structure is altered from saturated to trans fat. Does this happen with cheeses also? The reason I ask is I’m on the Metabolic Diet (high fat, low carb, carb load periods) and I wanted to add some cheese to this egg bake stuff I make. Thanks.

I think that you’d only have to worry about it becoming trans fat if you REALLY get the heat up. I doubt that mixing some cheese into your eggs will do this.

Heating oils up does not cause them to be “trans” fats. If you are eating real cheese, you have no worries. Read JB’s fat article.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=644939

I think it’s unsaturated fats that you have to worry about. Saturates are stable in high tempratures.

[quote]Watson2K5 wrote:
I think it’s unsaturated fats that you have to worry about. Saturates are stable in high tempratures.[/quote]

Cheese contains predominantly saturated fatty acids. However, because of bacterial fermentation in the bowel of the ruminant, there is formation of a variety of tras-unsaturated fatty acids within the resultant fat composition from the milk.

This can range upto 5% of the total fatty acids of the cheese, but the actual types of trans is different to the types of trans formed from hydrogenation. Trans-vaccenic acid is the predominant trans fatty acid from dairy, and eladic acid is the predomainant trans fatty acid from hydrogenation.

The trans in milk fat also includes some conjugated linoleic acid (conjugated meaning it has both a cis and trans bond within the molecule.)

now that I think about it a little more, worrying about melting some cheese and the fat turning into trans-fat would be on parallel to cooking steak and anything else with fat in it. Seeing how there’s no apparent conversion in most foods, the same would most likely (and does) hold true for your cheese.

[quote]cycomiko wrote:
Watson2K5 wrote:
I think it’s unsaturated fats that you have to worry about. Saturates are stable in high tempratures.

Cheese contains predominantly saturated fatty acids. However, because of bacterial fermentation in the bowel of the ruminant, there is formation of a variety of tras-unsaturated fatty acids within the resultant fat composition from the milk.

This can range upto 5% of the total fatty acids of the cheese, but the actual types of trans is different to the types of trans formed from hydrogenation. Trans-vaccenic acid is the predominant trans fatty acid from dairy, and eladic acid is the predomainant trans fatty acid from hydrogenation.

The trans in milk fat also includes some conjugated linoleic acid (conjugated meaning it has both a cis and trans bond within the molecule.)[/quote]

WOW! Watson, are you saying the that by eating whole foods and avoiding processed shit like chips, fries, and margarine, we are still eating some trans-fats??? Then, they must not be that bad in very small quantities, or that’s just another reason that humans were not meant to consume dairy (or does this happen in human mammaries as well???).

Thanks,

Top-MI-Sirloin

My post was directed at cycomiko. Thanks.

TS

I know it gets confusing but not all trans fatty acids are detrimental, just as not all saturated fats are equally detrimental. CLA isomers are probably the best example of a potentially helpful trans (but not hydrogenated) fat.

There’s aleready some solid info. in this thread about elaidic acid (trans version of healthful oleic acid).

And you might want to use the search at the top of the page there to look up “Practical Fats”. There you can find info. such as the need for a catalyst when forming trans fatty acids…

[quote]TopSirloin wrote:

WOW! Watson, are you saying the that by eating whole foods and avoiding processed shit like chips, fries, and margarine, we are still eating some trans-fats??? Then, they must not be that bad in very small quantities, or that’s just another reason that humans were not meant to consume dairy (or does this happen in human mammaries as well???).

Thanks,

Top-MI-Sirloin[/quote]

you find trans unsaturated fats in a variety of foods, including beef, lamb, pork, chicken and fish.

We have had trans fat within our diets for years, just no where near the absolute quantity that is within the average diet recently.

[quote]TopSirloin wrote:
My post was directed at cycomiko. Thanks.

TS[/quote]

also FWIW

one of hte european countries have banned the use of trans fatty acids within food sources, however dairy is not included within this ban.

The FDA labelling requirement that comes into law next year is not seperating the various trans fat isomers, so CLA legally has to be labelled as a trans fat if its within a food system (supplements are a seperate issue)