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Training Routine Recommendation

Hey, all… I have a friend who wants to start a good routine. Before you all shout out “Rippetoe’s” let me say this: he is almost 60 years old, and has had surgery on his back (a fusion, I think?). He doesn’t feel comfortable with weights, and being a former Marine (oorah), has expressed interest in a bodyweight-only program.

Right now, he has started by modifying his diet (I’m working with him on this to the best of my abilities), and is also taking a walk for 45-60 minutes every day.

Personally, I’m at a loss as to a good program to get him on. I’ve thought about simple push-ups, pull-ups, dips, and sit-ups, but I’m sure there are probably more effective routines already established.

Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks!

RIPPETOES!!

Sometimes you gotta say things just to say them :slight_smile:

If he [quote]doesn’t feel comfortable with weights[/quote], chances are he’s got a psychological block against using them and would actively hurt himself if you tried to get him lifting heavy.

Pushups, pullups, dips, situps and bodyweight squats are great to start him out on. However, after two weeks (definitely after a month, depending on how fat he is), he’ll have developed enough strength where it won’t be feasible to continue doing bodyweight stuff.

Once he hits that point, you can teach him about benching, squatting, and deadlifting. Technique will be very important, and I would advise you to print out articles (Dave Tate’s Bench 600 lbs, The Dead Zone, and Squatting from Head to Toe} have him read it, and only act as clarification, instead of teaching him technique yourself.

This isn’t to knock your technique or teaching ability- sometimes people need the safety they can find in ‘experts’, and printed articles provide that.

If he’s still afraid of lifting weights long after he’s gotten too good at bodyweight exercises for them to be useful… drop him. Sometimes people get stuck in their ways and refuse to change. Nothing doing to help them. C’est la vie.

Oh, and the diet and walking are great. If he’s doing them, that could be half the battle right there. Good job :slight_smile:

He is 60, body weight training is probably perfect for him. Starting him off with weights would actually be a mistake. Otep was right on the money, but I would say that moving into weights isn’t a necessity. For a 60 year old you the goal should be to get him to move his body effectively, without worrying about external load, and you can supply varying degrees of difficulty and progression with bodyweight exercises. And if you add in external load try bands and some dumbbells.

Don’t forget about lunges(many variations), single leg squats(off of a high box to start), body weight rows, planks, and some more I can’t think of right now.

I would also try to increase work density, that would be one of the best methods of progressive overload I think.

[quote]Zagman wrote:
He is 60, body weight training is probably perfect for him. Starting him off with weights would actually be a mistake. Otep was right on the money, but I would say that moving into weights isn’t a necessity. For a 60 year old you the goal should be to get him to move his body effectively, without worrying about external load, and you can supply varying degrees of difficulty and progression with bodyweight exercises. And if you add in external load try bands and some dumbbells.

Don’t forget about lunges(many variations), single leg squats(off of a high box to start), body weight rows, planks, and some more I can’t think of right now.

I would also try to increase work density, that would be one of the best methods of progressive overload I think.[/quote]

For weights, I think goblet squats are a great breaking into lifting lift. goblet squats, pushups chins, inverted rows, dips. Also: the glute ham raise/reverse hyper may be good ideas. Eventually get him dumbell benching, and rowing then comes the deadlift if deemed appropriate for his case.

You might want to post in the 35 and Older section. Old Navy (the member) comes to mind as a knowledgeable person in the 60’s.

Thanks for all the input! For the record, I have tried to get him to start lifting weights, but with his back surgery, he’s extraordinarily resistant to the idea. So, baby steps. I think that if he can progress through non-“lifting” exercises, he might start thinking about a simple lifting program.

I’ll re-ask this is 35 and over! Again, thanks for the suggestions!!