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Training Muay Thai and MMA?

I have been training muay thai now for about 6month. Before that I trained boxing for a year. I really liked muay thai, but wants to start train MMA instead because it contains more . I heard that during MMA sessions you start from the floor and work your way up, is that right? and do you think I should keep train muay thai as a complement for MMA , (want to focuse on stand up striking)or should I just start with it directly?

thanks :wink:

Depends on the MMA class and the MT class, too many variables.

If you like where you are training MT, start going to the MMA classes in addition then see how it pans out.

Ugh, this is a ridiculous question. You don’t “train MMA”, you train Boxing, Muay Thai, and one of or a combination of BJJ, Pankrase, Combat Sambo, and perhaps Judo though you could use the skillsets for ALL of them.

This is the problem facing MMA today, there are far, far, far too many one dimensional fighters and people that think “Oh I’d better specialize in BJJ and maybe train some boxing or muay thai on the side just in case…”

NO. This is flawed thinking. Horribly flawed thinking. It’s like a bodybuilder only doing “curls for girls” exercises. It doesn’t matter if you are new, it doesn’t matter if you only train on a local level and never intend to take it far enough to get paid for it. Whatever your intention is, give it your best shot. Find a gym that offers more than one class by quality instructors and take both a striking class and a submission class.

I’ve wanted nothing more than to train Martial Arts all of my life, and I was particularly struck by a line from an early Jet Li movie of all things. In the movie Jet Li is facing a Master Japanese Martial Artist and the man says to him “The key to being a good fighter lies not in mastering one form, rather it lies in learning to adapt to all forms.” I probably haven’t got the quote exactly right, but the principle is the same. Don’t use just one style, use ALL styles. Take a little bit from everywhere and become a more well rounded fighter.

Personally, I’m a huge fan of striking, I’m tall, long arms, long legs, powerful build, I love Muay Thai more than anything. But I still take boxing classes so I can be a more rounded striker. When it comes to grappling I prefer Pankrase over BJJ, but I still sit in on and learn from the BJJ classes because you never know when you’ll have to adapt on the fly and you really don’t want your skillset to be limited.

Unfortunately we’ve seen far too much of that in the UFC, Affliction, the now dead EliteXC, Strikeforce and even Dream and most noticeable is The Ultimate Fighter reality TV Show. You’ll see guys who are REALLY good grapplers, but they suck at striking, or they’re REALLY good strikers but as soon as they get taken down they’re like a fish out of water, struggling to fight but ultimately losing the battle. And it makes me sad. People are so eager to get into the scene that they are ignoring what is fundamentally important.

So do yourself a favor, even if you just want to be a weekend warrior, maybe join some open competitions sometime or even compete in the amateur circuit locally. Train BOTH Muay Thai AND a grappling art. Find a decent BJJ or Pankrase Class and stick with the Muay Thai at the same time. You won’t regret it and perhaps someday if and when you do decide to step into the ring or octagon you’ll end up facing a guy who used to be like you and chose one over the other instead of both and you’ll punish him on your feet and on the ground and walk away not only the Winner, but knowing that you’re the all around better fighter.

Ugh, this is a ridiculous question. You don’t “train MMA”, you train Boxing, Muay Thai, and one of or a combination of BJJ, Pankrase, Combat Sambo, and perhaps Judo though you could use the skillsets for ALL of them.

This is the problem facing MMA today, there are far, far, far too many one dimensional fighters and people that think “Oh I’d better specialize in BJJ and maybe train some boxing or muay thai on the side just in case…”

If you are a member of a serious gym, there are MANY ‘MMA classes’. So I beg to differ with you “you don’t train mma” comment.

I do agree that being well rounded is essential :slight_smile:

Agreed, different gyms do it differently but you should have at least some classes of MMA where you put it all together.

I’m going to have to disagree with you there Rev Sin.

The future of the sport is not in jack of all trade fighters who are good at muay thai, boxing, grappling, etc separately and then try to synthesize them but rather athletes who BEGIN training MMA as a synthesized sport. There will be different gyms that probably teach different vale tudo methodologies (emphasis on standup or wrestling) but all together it will be MMA.

For instance
Team Quest
Combat Submission Wrestling
Combat Sambo
Chute Boxe
Shooto
etc

All teach striking and grappling but synthesized as one. Meanwhile they do divide the structure to specifically work on details…like a decathlete having a shotput coach, sprint coach, etc… the beauty of it is the transitions between the miscellaneous arts.

Seeing Fedor simultaneously catch a kick with one hand, throw an overhand right and SLIGHTLY just before the OHright connects he let the kick go and was going for a bodyclinch to a takedown is the fluid transition between ranges that only comes from someone who meticulously trains FOR that.

I think the problem lately is that people get in the hassle of trying to train 1 year striking, 1 year grappling, 1 year mma. when in reality they should be training all three simultaneously and if they can’t do that. then just train 3 years mma.

If you have 600+ hrs training in a year, and you spent 600 on grappling, 600 striking, 600 on full MMA. That’s great! but you also missed out on 600 hrs of grappling, and 600 hrs of striking the two prior years.

if you spent the full 1800 hrs on a little of both, and training both each session. You’re better off because you’re being exposed it CONSTANTLY. Frequency and consistency will make you a better fighter. How fucking rusty will you get if you don’t grapple for a year?

Etc…

Frank Trigg once said that fedor is like a brown belt at everything. He might not be THE BEST striker, or sub guy, but he’s so good at EVERYTHING that you can’t just expect to beat him OUTRIGHT anywhere because he can just change ranges.

That same concept is the future, imo.

When you have kids now who have been training specifically to fight MMA since they were 8 or 9 then you’ll see the well-rounded thing that I’m referring to.

Exactly, they will be training MMA as ONE complete entity, with all the stipulations - perhaps shooting for takedowns with the view to setting up clinches + uppercuts, or in terms of how we would see it (in this age), perhaps training wrestling WITH striking and muay thai clinch, and bjj with ground and pound and wrestlling control/positioning… etc etc etc.

like Xen Nova said : “The future of the sport is not in jack of all trade fighters who are good at muay thai, boxing, grappling, etc separately and then try to synthesize them but rather athletes who BEGIN training MMA as a synthesized sport”.

that was the thing I wanted at first but I just asked because i dont have any experience of MMA classes before and because of that wondered if I maybe needed to take an extra muay thai class as a complement for it MMA. But I have now decided to keep it to only MMA instead

if you CAN take an extra muay thai class… it’s only going to make you better. If you’re going to be a triathlete i recommend trying a 5k first…same concept.

i kind of disagree…

i do think that it’s important to be well-rounded in all aspects of MMA to compete successfully, and especially counter other fighters. but i think most of the truely dominant fighters all specialized in one thing, and that’s what made them dangerous…BJ Penn as an example. he’s technically not a great striker, but since most guys really don’t want to go to the gorund with him, they’ll trade shots with him all day, allowing him to a) knock them out or b)bait them and then take them down and submit them.

ideally one would be a master at all ranges, but realistically, i think a fighter should learn the basics, and really master where they’re most dominant/comfortable…

to cycobushmaster

I think you will always be better in some kind of fighting, better standing then striking or something similar. That is something that just happens, and you will always in your mind prefer one method more than the other. So you can still train and be well-rounded and at the same time you prefer one method more than the other

Just my thoughts :slight_smile:

The future will continue to be some rounded fighters who are good in all aspects but not outstanding in any, combined with some fighters who are outstanding in one aspect but lacking or average in others.

On any given day either type of fighter can win. This is why MMA is so exciting.

Overall, general standards will continue to improve but you will still see a good standup guy with no ground game beating a more rounded fighter and then get mauled by a grappler in their next fight.

It is far more about match ups in MMA than in other fight sports.