T Nation

Training Logs?

Dave Tate said that a lot of Westside guys don’t use training logs or they only record their Max effort lifts and maybe a few details about the supplementary exercises.

I usually record weights and sets and reps used for all my lifts, but I have been wondering if I could still make good progress without doing this.

Do you think it is necessary to know that I did for example, db curls 70x10x3 on Monday so at the next workout I can try to add more weight?

Or is it okay to just lift instinctively even though I may forget what weight I used for the last workout?

I’d say it probably depends on how long you have been training and how well you know your body.

I keep a pretty meticulous training log for myself, but I am nowhere near to the same league as Dave.

I think it would be wise for beginners to keep logs, the advanced can decide on their own. They know what works for them.

Thanks Matt!!

How important is progress on the supplemental exercises?

I know you shoud try for a new pr every week with ME exercises, but how often should one add weight to the supplemental stuff?
Is it okay to add slowly to these types of exercises?

Thanks for your help.

There is no right or wrong. As long as your lifts are increasing, keep doing what you are doing. When they stagnate, time to make some changes. Which by the way, the log will make easier.

I’m trying keeping my supp mvmts the same for this cycle, only increasing in weight every couple weeks.

I’ll know how it works after my meet in Dec…

Anyone have a decent template for a trainging log?

[quote]jammon wrote:
Anyone have a decent template for a trainging log? [/quote]

I like mine. When I make a foolproof version and my subsequent first million, I’ll get one to you.

Right now, I just use a teachers log / student record book. It is durable with a plastic cover that tolerates my sweaty hands. The pages are not bound as well as I would prefer, but they stay together better than other things I have tried. Also the binder rings are the perfect size to stick my pen in without it falling out.

I make each row a day, so each pair of pages is a month. It allows me to review between 30 and 60 days of training by simply looking at that page or flipping back one. The overall time element (weeks and months) I find very important. Two things help me here: [1] recording OFF days (just writing “OFF”) and [2] breaking up the entire record into months.

I can provide more details on the organization if you’re interested.

Also, I write down significant events - ie. went out of town for weekend, drank alcohol, sick, sleep deprived, etc.

YMMV - I hardly ever see any two that are the same. Of course I hardly see anyone use them either. Me and one other guy at my gym. Unf*ckingbelievable.

Bastard F*ck Guy

[quote]basementD wrote:
Do you think it is necessary to know that I did for example, db curls 70x10x3 on Monday so at the next workout I can try to add more weight?
[/quote]

maybe not, but does it hurt to write it down? it may not be a help in the short run, but can help if you look at the long term plan and diagnosing causes of injuries, etc.

[quote]joe_r wrote:
basementD wrote:
Do you think it is necessary to know that I did for example, db curls 70x10x3 on Monday so at the next workout I can try to add more weight?

maybe not, but does it hurt to write it down? it may not be a help in the short run, but can help if you look at the long term plan and diagnosing causes of injuries, etc.[/quote]

maybe you are missing the point of a training log? yes it can be very important to know that you did 70x10x3 on Monday … maybe the next workout is NEXT monday … will you remember? i look back at the previous two or three workouts to determine today’s.

equally importantly i believe the longer term aspect is huge. look back to see what you were doing 1, 3, or 12 months ago. did it work? why? why not?