T Nation

Training in Outer Space

Seeing as we have a bunch of knowledge guys here, we could probably do (penniless) NASA a favor and figure out how to prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings. Let it begin

[quote]Pabro wrote:
Seeing as we have a bunch of knowledge guys here, we could probably do (penniless) NASA a favor and figure out how to prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings. Let it begin[/quote]

Why would we prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings?

How else are they going to earn a living?

We need to increase the bounty on weaklings if we ever want to get to Mars.

[quote]Pabro wrote:
Seeing as we have a bunch of knowledge guys here, we could probably do (penniless) NASA a favor and figure out how to prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings. Let it begin[/quote]

I’m not even sure what you’re asking.

Its a fun question that ultimately needs solving.

From what I recall, it’s about much more than muscle atrophy though. Outside of a gravity well and atmospheric pressure, apparently our bones start to disintegrate as well.

When Ender gets to Battle School, we learn that the entire structure is rotating and centrifugal force helps generate “gravity” for the facility. Perhaps those stories are onto something in that we’ll eventually need to manipulate gravity, whatever that means.

edit - added wiki link

It is only March but, someone bookmark this as a nominee for worst thread of the year.

It is only March but, someone bookmark this as a nominee for worst thread of the year.

This: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reduced_muscle_mass,_strength_and_performance_in_space
Atrophy is a big problem in space. This think tank can find some way to create buff super solider astronauts for fighting off alien invaders. Or as SkyzykS suggests, use them to boost our wallets

  1. Don’t ask smart questions on this website or questions that require anything above a highschool education.
    2)NASA tackled the problem with an invention that lead to the BowFlex. Elastic tension in the rods provides a substitute to gravitational loafing.

So the Bowflex is based on NASA’s ARED?

[quote]Aero51 wrote:
2)NASA tackled the problem with an invention that lead to the BowFlex. Elastic tension in the rods provides a substitute to gravitational loafing.[/quote]

[quote]Aero51 wrote:

  1. Don’t ask smart questions on this website or questions that require anything above a highschool education.
    2)NASA tackled the problem with an invention that lead to the BowFlex. Elastic tension in the rods provides a substitute to gravitational loafing.[/quote]

Ok. So what can be done to mimic the over all effects of gravity on our body?

How about a moderately magnetic suit the exerts the same force as gravity would over our entire body, so that we have to activate all of the muscle required to stand upright and move around against it?

How could the effective range of a field be extended beyond its current, very short range of effectiveness without having a great disparity due to the distance between say, your feet and your head?

Steroid injections that prevent muscle atrophy + “fake” gravity exercise.

Power bands

Cheap (NASA has little money since Obama took it all away from them)
Light (it costs a lot of money to bring cargo into outer space)
Small (they probably don’t have a lot if cargo space in the space ship)

/thread

The magnet idea is pretty interesting. However, the magnetic strength required to replicate the 160 lbs pull of an average guy on Earth in zero gravity would probably be extremely high. Such high power magnets would probably interfere with necessary electronics in the tight spaces of the international space station. Has potential if people could work out the logistics.

There are two ways to mimic gravity.

  1. rotate the shuttle according to a = v^2/r
  2. design a propulsion system such that the thrust is equal to the acceleration of gravity. The problem with this is that you will approach light speed in a finite (believe it not a relatively short amount of time) timespan.
    Magnetic strength will not work because people are not magnetic…and designing a magnetic suit is costly and heavy to say the least

[quote]Aero51 wrote:
There are two ways to mimic gravity.

  1. rotate the shuttle according to a = v^2/r
  2. design a propulsion system such that the thrust is equal to the acceleration of gravity. The problem with this is that you will approach light speed in a finite (believe it not a relatively short amount of time) timespan.
    Magnetic strength will not work because people are not magnetic…and designing a magnetic suit is costly and heavy to say the least[/quote]

I feel like I’m going out a limb by saying this, but if you found the solution to deep space travel, you wouldn’t be posting it on an internet forum.

[quote]Aero51 wrote:
There are two ways to mimic gravity.

  1. rotate the shuttle according to a = v^2/r

  2. design a propulsion system such that the thrust is equal to the acceleration of gravity. The problem with this is that you will approach light speed in a finite (believe it not a relatively short amount of time) timespan.
    Magnetic strength will not work because people are not magnetic…and designing a magnetic suit is costly and heavy to say the least[/quote]

  3. Rotation could be good for orbit, but how about long distance travel which may need to be directed by engines?

2)Oh yeah, but a fucking warp drive that will quickly accelerate a ship to light speed is cheapo depot huh? It’s not like the walk ways have to be lined with rare earth magnets. They could be electro magnets or hybrid electro/AlNiCo. and the suit doesn’t need to contain a whole lot of material if the field is modulated by the floor/ceiling.

[quote]Aero51 wrote:
There are two ways to mimic gravity.

  1. rotate the shuttle according to a = v^2/r
  2. design a propulsion system such that the thrust is equal to the acceleration of gravity. The problem with this is that you will approach light speed in a finite (believe it not a relatively short amount of time) timespan.
    Magnetic strength will not work because people are not magnetic…and designing a magnetic suit is costly and heavy to say the least[/quote]

With an acceleration of 9.81m/s^2, and light speed at 300,000,000 m/s, it would take you:

3,000,000,000/9.81 = (m/s)/(m/s^2) = s = 305,810,398 seconds.
305,810,398 seconds * (1minute/ 60 seconds) = 5,096,840 minutes
5,096,840 minutes * (1 hour/60 minutes) = 84,948 hours
84,948 hours * (1 day/24 hours) = 3,540 days
3,540 days * (1 year/365) = 9.7 years.

9.7 years to reach the speed of light, assuming you violate laws of physics.

Also, you have completely misunderstood how that equation is used.
a = v/r^2 means for a given velocity v, with a given radius r, you’ll get a centripetal/centrifugal acceleration a. This means the velocity DOES NOT CHANGE so you would never reach the speed of light or even get close.


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[quote]SkyzykS wrote:

[quote]Pabro wrote:
Seeing as we have a bunch of knowledge guys here, we could probably do (penniless) NASA a favor and figure out how to prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings. Let it begin[/quote]

Why would we prevent astronauts from turning in weaklings?

How else are they going to earn a living?

We need to increase the bounty on weaklings if we ever want to get to Mars.
[/quote]

We need to find a balance, otherwise they’ll turn in so many weaklings that it will eventually have a negative effect on the boffin population.

easy fix. just use the hydraulic suits they’re testing to increase physical strength or to help people walk. adjust them to an appropriate resistance level and get your workout. will also be useful on Mars to move heavy objects.