T Nation

Train Like a Spartan!

[quote]Der Candy wrote:
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  1. I think intensity is very important. When I train I imagine myself as a Viking warrior, or as Batman being trained by the Ninjas in the mountains of Asia, or the Doomguy preparing to take on the hideous hordes of hell.[/quote]

word.

Sigh.

[quote]gatesoftanhauser wrote:
I respect what the actors did, yes, but some of it was make up effects (putting dark shadowing on the serratus and also the incredible amount of tanning those guys. Would I love to look like the 300? Absolutely.

You have to remember also that the movie producers and casting agents didn’t cast alot of big name stars in 300, they picked alot of extras that were in insane shape to begin with. David Wenham had to gain 80 pounds for the role. Thus, not every single extra and actor in 300 was training alongside Gerard Butler and David Wenham.[/quote]

i refuse to believe that he gained 80lbs for that movie. i dont know how tall he is, but lets give him the benefit of the doubt at 6ft. we’ll also give him the benefit of the doubt of 200lbs in that movie. so youre telling me that he normally weighs in at 120lbs at 6ft (keep in mind, the numbers dont matter much here, its the 80lbs thats ridiculous).

i am not some huge david wenham fan, ive seen him in a few things i think, but i dont particularly follow him. unless he had just wrapped a project where he went to an extremely low bw such as the role christian bale had a couple years ago, theres no way he gained 80lbs for the role. if it was something similar to that though, youd have to figure that a huge portion of that would simply be from beginning to eat again.

Wow, great article, this definitely deserves some stars in my opinion. Your point reminded me of my own goals.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:

I also think both institutions use of high-rep olympic lifting is just weird. There might be some instances where in Olympic Lifting you might train with more than 6 reps, but I can’t think of many.
[/quote]

High repetition olympic lifts build awesome conditioning, that’s why they do them, not to lift heavy weights. It builds a kind of conditioning that running will never get you.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Sigh. [/quote]

Yup.

[quote]Fitnessdiva wrote:
FightingScott wrote:

I also think both institutions use of high-rep olympic lifting is just weird. There might be some instances where in Olympic Lifting you might train with more than 6 reps, but I can’t think of many.

High repetition olympic lifts build awesome conditioning, that’s why they do them, not to lift heavy weights. It builds a kind of conditioning that running will never get you.[/quote]

Your not running hard enough.

[quote]supermick wrote:
Fitnessdiva wrote:
FightingScott wrote:

I also think both institutions use of high-rep olympic lifting is just weird. There might be some instances where in Olympic Lifting you might train with more than 6 reps, but I can’t think of many.

High repetition olympic lifts build awesome conditioning, that’s why they do them, not to lift heavy weights. It builds a kind of conditioning that running will never get you.

Your not running hard enough.

[/quote]

running hard is hard

[quote]supermick wrote:
Fitnessdiva wrote:
FightingScott wrote:

I also think both institutions use of high-rep olympic lifting is just weird. There might be some instances where in Olympic Lifting you might train with more than 6 reps, but I can’t think of many.

High repetition olympic lifts build awesome conditioning, that’s why they do them, not to lift heavy weights. It builds a kind of conditioning that running will never get you.

Your not running hard enough.

[/quote]

Agreed. Anyone that makes that statement has never run hills with intensity.

I have also read that the lead actor trained with a bodybuilder.

Have you ever tried high repetition olympic lifts at all?

I built up to an 11:30 2 mile run time using interval training. I’m pretty sure I’ve run hard enough.

Try running up a hill with 40lbs strapped to you.

Thibs says doing Olympic lifts for high repetitions is no good unless you’re very experienced with those lifts, and I tend to agree with him. If you’re using a weight that is challenging, you’re form will quickly go down the the drain. I’m speaking from viewpoint of an athlete who has been doing solidly for the past 6 years.

[quote]Fitnessdiva wrote:
Have you ever tried high repetition olympic lifts at all?

[/quote]

Yes. There is no comparison. Hard hill running is more more brutal. Once you hit failure and miss a lift you are done and taking a break. No such easy rest mechanism built into sprinting hills.

[quote]rsg wrote:
Try running up a hill with 40lbs strapped to you.[/quote]

Or with someone dragging on your waistband.

Just to clarify my previous statement I have done high rep complexs that incorporate olympic style movements such as cleans. I assume that is what Fitnessdiva is talking about. I would never do high rep pure olympic lifts. Doesn’t make sense.

And how long of a rest do you take? Are those o-lifts the only thing you are doing, or are you doing a circuit? Are you trying to use too much weight? What kind of conditioning are you trying to build?

I’d also say that a rest mechanism is built into sprinting hills as you have to go back down.

Not saying sprinting hills or HIIT aren’t great conditioning tools but they are different than the kind of conditioning you build with high rep O-lifts.

If you are training for MMA, wrestling, or bjj, I think o-lifts in a circuit would be a better training tool.

Ok, Ok, has anyone seen these actor lately? even 2 months after the movie finished shooting? Look everyone can get in great shape if they have all there meals prepared and timed and all there supplements counted and nap time and nothing else to do all day but train ,eat and sleep and get paid millions of dollars to do it.

And if they are lucky enough to have that oppertunity and then a month later go back to how they were, then it was all a waste , they dont deserve any of the praise or admiration, the bodybuilders deserve it all!!! day in day out they train ,eat, sleep and sh*t weightlifting. and for what?

they dont all get millions of dollars or a group of trainers or entourage that yell at you and do everything for you. and they stay strong and huge all freakin year long… its all about pride, glory , so if you think the training the actors did in 300 was hard… Try a day in the life of a bodybuilder… those are warriors… spartans of our time.

no battle is harder then the battle within . when there body is crying STOP!!! there soul is shouting NEVERRRRRR!!!

[quote]Fitnessdiva wrote:
And how long of a rest do you take? Are those o-lifts the only thing you are doing, or are you doing a circuit? Are you trying to use too much weight? What kind of conditioning are you trying to build?

I’d also say that a rest mechanism is built into sprinting hills as you have to go back down.

Not saying sprinting hills or HIIT aren’t great conditioning tools but they are different than the kind of conditioning you build with high rep O-lifts.

If you are training for MMA, wrestling, or bjj, I think o-lifts in a circuit would be a better training tool.[/quote]

Barbell complexes (I think this is what you mean) are a good tool and very convenient in a gym.

Hill sprints are the toughest form of conditioning I have ever done but they actually require you to leave the gym and find a hill.

They certainly both have their place.

I do not think there is a single best technique for getting in your best conditioned shape possible. But it would be a combination of multiple conditioning tactics that will yield the best results. I do not think there is much sense to arguing if high rep Olympic lifts are better than hill sprints. You will find very well conditioned individuals on either end of the spectrum.

Go Dan Erickson!!! WOW I think you hit the sweet spot. Honestly guys and gals, Im not out to compare the actors of 300 to arnold, nor I am suggesting that their training emulates real spartan training. Im saying that this was one hell of a movie first off;) but try to remember why you started training.

Maybe not to be a spartan, but for possibly looks, bettering your body, team affiliation, or just as a hobby. These guys look pretty good compared to most of the population. Hey, what works, works. I dont really care for some types of training and others I really enjoy. I think that many of us get to caught up in the “perfect program superiorarity complex” thats a trademark disease! :wink:

Many of us loose focus, loosing that go gettem attitude or live or die mentality where were really stoked to be training. If running floats your boat, then run, if O lifts do it for you then O lift. Hey, and if watching 300 makes you gain 30 lbs of muscle then do that!

Maybe once in a while we should take a step back, analyize out results and progress and consider other options. The transformation some of those guys went through was incredible, their work ethic was incredible regardless of motivation, and what they pulled off was absolutley incredible, give credit where credits due, and the same motto should be applied to your own training. Dont BS yourself and enjoy training.

I think their results are a function of non-linear periodization.