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Train Like a Powerlifter and Still Look Good Naked

First of all I have to ask what your goal is - body composition? strength? competing?
Every goal has a completely different answer.
Are you looking to improve a specific lift? (example - you can squat every day but then the other lifts are at a lower volume and frequency)
My answer is also dependent on how much weight you are moving…are you a beginner? The higher the weights, the less volume (I wrote about this a bit in my squat thread if you want to take a look?).
Your program needs to be more specific to be really effective - decide your goals and key lifts and I can help you from there. I’m not going to build you a program, but I’ll help get you going.
This program is fine if you just want to have fun in the gym, but it’s not specific enough to make ideal improvements in body comp, or strength, or specific lift…you need to have a specific goal and then revolve your program around that goal.

First of all powerlifting and bodybuilding are two very different beasts.
Here’s why I believe in my approach when it comes to power - both dieting and training, especially with high volume, are catabolic activities. If you train more and diet, you increase your risk of losing muscle tissue because if this. When you peak for a meet and diet toward the end of the cycle, the heavy weight and high intensity will give your muscle enough stimulation and a “reason” to remain, assuming that the training program is smart (enough volume to keep the muscle, but not too much - obviously this volume would be less than a true hypertrophy phase). When dieting, the calorie deficit alone will be enough to get rid of the fat without risking muscle by doing too much work, and the intensity of the lifting you do will be enough to keep muscle. Also keep in mind we are talking about powerlifting…even if you do lose 1lb of muscle and fat with it, you’ll still have all the neural benefits of the training cycle, as well as the benefit of the peaking cycle…muscle mass is just one factor in a bigger picture of effective lifting.
As for your body building question - that makes it a different thing altogether, as maintaining muscle mass is number 1 priority. In off season/hypertrophy phase I still try to keep as heavy as possible on the bar, and even go as low as powerlifting reps in some exercises (1-5). I also have a very high volume as I can support it with food. When I start dieting, I keep the same volume and try to lift as heavy as possible, but will keep rep ranges higher (not under 4-5 at the most)…so I still lift as heavy as I can, even when I’m dieting. I squatted 500 for 18 reps, 2 weeks out from a body building show lol.

[quote=“Amit_Sapir, post:21, topic:222376, full:true”]
First of all I have to ask what your goal is - body composition? strength? competing?
Every goal has a completely different answer.
Are you looking to improve a specific lift? (example - you can squat every day but then the other lifts are at a lower volume and frequency)
My answer is also dependent on how much weight you are moving…are you a beginner? The higher the weights, the less volume (I wrote about this a bit in my squat thread if you want to take a look?).
Your program needs to be more specific to be really effective - decide your goals and key lifts and I can help you from there. I’m not going to build you a program, but I’ll help get you going.
This program is fine if you just want to have fun in the gym, but it’s not specific enough to make ideal improvements in body comp, or strength, or specific lift…you need to have a specific goal and then revolve your program around that goal. [/quote]

Hi Amit,

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.

If I’m being honest with myself then I’d have to say improving my body composition is my primary goal with getting stronger overall a very close second. I’m 5’9" at 215 and a bit chubby… I do not compete in anything. I’m really just a gym rat. I would say I am a beginner as far as my lifts go. My deadlift is about 425, squat 330, Bench 275, and OHP 165.

As far as improving specific lifts, I would like to improve my squat and overhead press the most. I think they’re my two worst lifts. At the same time, I feel like my chest really lags as far as development goes.

I’ll re-visit your squat thread for more information.

Thank you again for your time!

Slightly off-topic, I realize, and my apologies. However I read above that you are available to hire. Would you PM me if you have availability and what your rates are? I am definitely interested. More or less for physique. Thank you.

The more I think about this the more it makes sense. In my case, there are guys several weight classes below me that are lifting bigger weights than me, so when you consider that I weigh 40-50lbs. more than some of them, the difference is definitely not due to muscle mass. You are confirming what I had already concluded a while ago, that I need to focus on perfecting my technique and getting some neural adaptations since I probably have more muscle than I can effectively use at the moment. As far as a training/periodization model, your method sounds better because you don’t get weaker at any point (unless you cut 30lbs. to squeeze into a lower weight class!), seeing as strength is the #1 priority for powerlifting.

Thanks!

How can I cut down weight/fat while still maintaing or increasing strength. I’m 242 rn and would like to cut down to 220

Awesome thread, I am way too fat and thinking about starting to compete in powerlifting, nowhere where I need to be right now so I am slowly going to work toward it.

What percentage of body fat would you put Reed at in the 2 pictures above?

Here are some general guidelines after considering your specifics…
I would squat every day (or close to it) - since body composition is your main goal, I would probably alter your rep numbers daily. The first day you squat 1-5 rep range (strength focus), second day 6-12 (hypertrophy focus), third something like 3 sets of 20, take a day off, repeat. I would probably also change up the squat variations and bars frequently - every session or every week (one week could be low bar day 1, high bar day 2, yoke or front squat day 3…or else do one week high bar, one week low, one week yoke etc…endless options really but the variety will help with body comp).
As for the overhead press and chest development…since you like high frequency, I would probably do one day OH and then one day chest variations. So after squat you can one day do OH press, the next incline press, the next day flat press. After finishing squat plus your second exercise as just listed, then move on to body building work.
This is very general but basically gives you two lifts to focus on per session, followed by body building work based on your needs.
Same idea for rep schemes as I mentioned for squats can be applied to OH press etc.

[quote=“usmccds423, post:23, topic:222376, full:true”]

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Hey there - email me ifbbproamitsapir@yahoo.CA (not .com)
I would be happy to talk to you about working together.

I don’t know anyone idiotic enough to cut that type of weight! ;)…especially not twice in 6 weeks lol (I heard it went pretty well for that guy…he’ll do it again and kill this record I’m sure).
Let me know if any other questions come up - sounds like you’re on track :slight_smile:
I lost some muscle during my 2 years powerlifting training and have only gotten stronger…muscle is important but not everything - very different than bodybuilding.

This is a pretty generalized question (general enough that the honest answer is: a smart diet and training program)…I’d love to help but perhaps you have specific questions about your current diet or training program? I don’t want to be writing programs on a forum, but if you post pictures and specific questions, I’m more than happy to give feedback!

Thanks!
I would say he’s 15-16% on the left and 11-12% on the right? Roughly…hard to say with photos only and he’s also holding some water.
Generally with 8% you see a solid six pack, 9-10% you’re getting to a solid six pack, under 8% you can see clear hard definition throughout your body.
Great that you’re thinking about heading toward powerlifting - it’s a great sport (also glad you’re considering your body fat percentage etc even though you’re leaning toward power…look like you lift).

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Thank you very much Amit, I really appreciate it!

One last question, how should I treat the deadlift? Should I drop it entirely for now or something else?

Thanks!
Chris

Two options here - very general obviously as I don’t actually know you or your level of training etc.

  1. light deadlift right after squats (probably what I would do) - 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps in the 70% range and aim toward too low volume rather than too high. If this is what you choose you can do it 3 times per week (one time conventional, one time sumo, one time off blocks).
  2. heavy session every 7-10 days and in this session go high volume, high intensity and don’t squat this day. Do your competition deadlift, another deadlift version (not competition) and two more accessories relating.
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Or, you could just say fuck it and where all of your trophies under your clothes.

Amit, do you generally go the moderate carb , low fat route when cutting or the higher fat low carb route? Will one work better depending on the individual or is it just about maintaining a calorie deficit?

But then how do you get the ladies?

I believe in high carb, moderate to high protein, and low fat for most performance athletes. There are always exceptions and everyone is different, but in general carbs are a better energy source than ketones for perfomance and mental sanity. I believe that yes it is more effective for cutting and manipulation for sure, as long as you get the timing and amounts correct, carbs are your friend (that’s why I’m such a fan of Plazma). I still have never seen a really successful athlete on a keto diet - body building and powerlifting both.

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