T Nation

Train Hard With or Without Easy Days

I recently started taking 4 meals a day with 3 protein shakes and started training with more weight.

Is it recomended to train hard every day (5-6 times a week) or should I take some easy days during the week?

A beginner is usually best served with training only 3 or 4 times per week.

[quote]oscarg wrote:
I recently started taking 4 meals a day with 3 protein shakes and started training with more weight.

Is it recomended to train hard every day (5-6 times a week) or should I take some easy days during the week?[/quote]

It’s easy to fall into the ‘more is better’ thinking, but your body needs rest, or you could be risking injury and no gains. I do 4 days/week myself right now; 6 def. seems excessive if you’re natural; it’s unlikely you’re recovering fully, and just digging deeper into your recuperative ability with back-to-back training sessions.

I wouldn’t have scheduled ‘light days’ each week (although periodization is another argument), but rather take a couple of days completely off. You should use judgment with your workout volume, as well. There are good stickies and articles on this around here. I know it’s hard to stay out of the gym sometimes, but your body will respond better if you don’t go every day.

There isn’t a set amount of days you “can” or “shouldn’t” work out.

Hit the gym 2-3 times a week, if your body feels like you could do another day go another.

I wouldn’t recommend going more then 5 days a week…but there are some exceptions.

Here is exhibited the problem of diminishing returns. Those extra couple of workouts aren’t really going to get you nearly as much as the first four, and they might take away some needed recovery time. I’d only really recommend doing those last two workouts, even if they’re light days, if

a) You’re training for strength much moreso than size
b) Your sport involves a great deal of skills-based practice (oly lifting or strongman)
c) Your nutrition and supplementation are on point, and anyone on this site could see that it’s well put together and has all your nutritional bases covered.
d) Your other four training sessions do not suffer a decrease in intensity.

Otherwise, you’re better off having spent those two hours of your week in the kitchen or sleeping.