T Nation

Toughest Military Training

Okay, you grunts out there. Let’s hear about the toughest thing you’ve ever had to do in training, either in boot or afterwards.

I once showed up unshaven in morning formation, and Drill Sergeant Price, who couldn’t stand me anyway, had me do “one zee-ro zee-ro” pushups in front of the platoon, before taking me over to Darby Queen for a session on the Ranger Net, because “dese pushups ain’t nuthin’ to yew, is dey, Ram-bo?” (yes, sad to say, that was my nickname at Fort Benning).

Up the net. Down the rope. Up the net. Down the rope. Many, many times. The first couple of times are easy. It’s the last couple that get you: you can’t decide whether to puke, faint, or die.

So. Let’s hear yours.

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Admit it, Pussbeard ye scurvy dog: ye be stalkin’ me around the forum!

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Once the major complained that my coffee was too strong and I had to make it again! Bloody Canadians…

Of all the humps, runs, and O-courses, the toughest, most physical 3 weeks of training was the Marine Combat Instructor of Water Survival school.

-2000+ meter “strip swims” starting in full camies with pockets open
-“water aerobics” across the width of an Olympic sized pool (underwater swims in full camies, butterfly, crawlstroke, “hands across America”, etc.)

-basic ARC Lifeguard rescues in full gear (including getting attacked by the victim and having to take them under water and apply the appropriate pressure point to get out of the hold)

-50 meter underwater swim (to graduate)

-“water confidence” drills (underwater boot retrieval from 15ft, underwater flips, 20 meter underwater swim, all with either hands or feet bound)

I came out shredded (and skinny). It was brutal but I loved it.

Former DD

[quote]pushharder wrote:
Varqanir wrote:
Admit it, Pussbeard ye scurvy dog: ye be stalkin’ me around the forum!

Aye, Varq, me mate not, ye ranker-din-a-monster-fucked cum queen smell makes it eezy.[/quote]

And well we know that ye always be hot on the scent of monster-fucked cum queens.

Following orders in french for five long years.

[quote]devilBASTARDdog wrote:
Of all the humps, runs, and O-courses, the toughest, most physical 3 weeks of training was the Marine Combat Instructor of Water Survival school.

-2000+ meter “strip swims” starting in full camies with pockets open
-“water aerobics” across the width of an Olympic sized pool (underwater swims in full camies, butterfly, crawlstroke, “hands across America”, etc.)

-basic ARC Lifeguard rescues in full gear (including getting attacked by the victim and having to take them under water and apply the appropriate pressure point to get out of the hold)

-50 meter underwater swim (to graduate)

-“water confidence” drills (underwater boot retrieval from 15ft, underwater flips, 20 meter underwater swim, all with either hands or feet bound)

I came out shredded (and skinny). It was brutal but I loved it.

Former DD[/quote]

I’ll agree the Marine Corps swim qual is a bastard, if you go all the way. That was the hardest thing I ever did. I have never been that fatigued in my whole life. All the full-pack swims, dragging “dead bodies” across the pool, the Instructors sneaking up behind you and dragging you to the bottom. That was a freaking long day.

Tied for that was the Endurance Course in Quantico, VA in February in about 3 feet of snow (it was so cold and nasty the base was actually shut down, but OCS did not stop). 8 miles of water obsticles, hills, low-crawling, and climbing. It was so cold that by the time we were done our uniforms were frozen on our bodies. No joke, they were hard and crunched when you moved.

[quote]Hollandse Nieuwe wrote:
Following orders in french for five long years.[/quote]

Well, all you really have to know is “retreat”.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Hollandse Nieuwe wrote:
Following orders in french for five long years.

Well, all you really have to know is “retreat”.[/quote]

I think it’s the marching with their arms high over their heads that is the hardest part of French military training.

DB

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
Hollandse Nieuwe wrote:
Following orders in french for five long years.

Well, all you really have to know is “retreat”.

I think it’s the marching with their arms high over their heads that is the hardest part of French military training.

DB[/quote]

Just Google “2eme REP”.

Practicing putting on Chem Warfare gear in Kuwait. Sunny, about 110F and wearing a suit (called a MOP) made of impervious material and a hood. All in the sand.

I think they did just to piss everyone off before the fighting started.

[quote]hedo wrote:
Practicing putting on Chem Warfare gear in Kuwait. Sunny, about 110F and wearing a suit (called a MOP) made of impervious material and a hood. All in the sand.

I think they did just to piss everyone off before the fighting started.[/quote]

They eat that up, don’t they? I remember digging full fighting positions (including overhead cover that I was forced to jump up and down on top of to prove it’s strength) at Ft. Meade in August (it was 100 degrees that day and 95% humidity) in full MOPP4 from 1000 to 1400 hours. I kid not when I say the suit was dark on the outside from sweat. Those suits feel pretty heavy when they’re full of sweat. Water through the drinking tubes doesn’t taste very good either.

DB

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
Hollandse Nieuwe wrote:
Following orders in french for five long years.

Well, all you really have to know is “retreat”.

I think it’s the marching with their arms high over their heads that is the hardest part of French military training.

DB[/quote]

French Army Rifle for sale: Never used, dropped once.

Tied for that was the Endurance Course in Quantico, VA in February in about 3 feet of snow (it was so cold and nasty the base was actually shut down, but OCS did not stop). 8 miles of water obsticles, hills, low-crawling, and climbing. It was so cold that by the time we were done our uniforms were frozen on our bodies. No joke, they were hard and crunched when you moved.

Thats freakin’ moto Sir, good on you for getting through it though. I’ll find out in August if I’m going to have the pleasure of heading to Quantico for the Fall OCS Class.

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
Hollandse Nieuwe wrote:
Following orders in french for five long years.

Well, all you really have to know is “retreat”.

I think it’s the marching with their arms high over their heads that is the hardest part of French military training.

DB[/quote]

I think there is a world of difference between the French Foreign Legion, which is where our Dutch friend likely served, and the French Army.

The two have about as much in common as the United States Marine Corps…and the Merseyside Marine Football Club.

Earning my stetson and spurs in a Cav Spur Ride. Two days of getting smoked, not eating or sleeping. Having an endless string of tasks when land-naving from station to station. Everybody was covered from the legendary piss pools and dookie dirt. In retrospect, it was pretty fun.

[quote]ybthere1 wrote:
Earning my stetson and spurs in a Cav Spur Ride. Two days of getting smoked, not eating or sleeping. Having an endless string of tasks when land-naving from station to station. Everybody was covered from the legendary piss pools and dookie dirt. In retrospect, it was pretty fun.[/quote]

You put way too much effort into that, I just beat up some Cav fag who decided to wear his shit to the strip club…that was one of my easier training sessions :wink:

Ranger School (10-89) sucked. (Darby, Yonah, Tennessee Valley Divide, Florida, Dugway)

Somehow, standing on Todd Field at a whopping 138 pounds made it all seem worthwhile.

What one won’t do for a half-moon shaped black and gold RANGER tab. ha ha