T Nation

Touch the Ground During Deadlifts?


#1

Hi guys,

short question from Germany:

During a set of Deadlifts - Should the weights touch the ground?

I always keep the muscles activated and start the movement back up before the weights touch the floor, because of the shockwave that goes through the body when banging it down and swinging it back up again (risk of injury?)

Can you name some pros and cons of both technics?

Thanks very much!


#2

Check out Dorian Yates deadlifting on youtube. Great form for bodybuilding.


#3

Cons of stopping the weight in mid-air

"complete and total destruction of your back"

It is something like a small atomic explosion...only all in one vertebrae.


#4

it's called DEADlift for one reason.


#5

I don't deadlift in my current routine (max-OT), but I've been thinking about incorporating these on back day. Like a constant tension exercise at the end of the session:


#6

x2 on Yates partials having value. Takes the quads out of the movement a bit. Probably best done at the end of a workout and not with maximal weight.

There is no injury risk from doing deadlifts off the floor properly. Shockwaves? Theres a solution to that, dont completely drop the weight to the floor. Decelerate the weight, instead of dropping it.


#7

Unless doing stiff leg deadlifts trying to target my hamstrings, all other deadlifing starts and ends on the floor. Yates used a form that obviously worked great for his development...but as BONEZ said above, when using the partial deadlifting method it's probably best to use towards the end of your workout not using maximal weights.


#8

Think you need to work on your form, can you post a vid.

For now if form is dodgy (it sounds like it might be), reset your form and go again. Might get less reps in short term though.


#9

most people can't do touch and go deadlifts without their form going to shit. you definitely DON"T want to bounce the bar off the floor.

reset after every rep and it will be safe. also, don't worry about the eccentric portion. just follow the bar down or drop that bitch. don't attempt to lower a heavy deadlift slowly. when i used to train in commercial gyms i would have small, weak "personal trainers" complaining about how i "don't control the weight down".

here's how i deadlift. it's all about being explosive off the floor and resetting on each rep. this insures that your form stays perfect and you also remove the stretch reflex which will make you more awesome overall.


#10

most people can't do touch and go deadlifts without their form going to shit. you definitely DON"T want to bounce the bar off the floor.

reset after every rep and it will be safe. also, don't worry about the eccentric portion. just follow the bar down or drop that bitch. don't attempt to lower a heavy deadlift slowly. when i used to train in commercial gyms i would have small, weak "personal trainers" complaining about how i "don't control the weight down".

here's how i deadlift. it's all about being explosive off the floor and resetting on each rep. this insures that your form stays perfect and you also remove the stretch reflex which will make you more awesome overall.


#11

Definitely listen to maraudermeat. I'm 95% certain that touch and go, high rep deadlifts led to form degradation which led to my facet dysfunction a couple years ago.


#12

watched the video of deadlifts with chains, doing them next backworkout!!


#13

chains are the cat's ass.


#14

#15

For heavy deads your suppose to drop the weight at around mid shin? On the eccentric portion of the lift.

The actual lift is done from the ground on every rep. Reset and adj. Every rep......


#16

Gawd, just the thought of those "bounce" reps makes me cringe.


#17

The only form of deads that I do where the weight doesn't touch the ground is straight legs, I stand on a platform and stop right before the ground for maximum hamstring stretch.

For conventional deadlift (even the name implies it should be done from a dead stop), you need to set the weight down and reset after each rep. Bounce reps take the tension off the muscle for a fraction of a second then the tension is just thrown back on, seems a good way to hurt yourself.

If you're doing deadlifts for muscular development (as opposed to PL), have a decent level of strength, and know what you're doing, yates deadlifts are a good option as well.


#18

Not that MMeat needs any validation from me but he was spot on!

I assume you are rather new to the iron game, so focusing on strength in the major lifts should be a priority. You can always do more hypertrophy-focused work for your back after your deadlifts, especially considering that back typically responds well to a higher volume of work.


#19

Why I hang out in here.
Tremendously helpful.


#20

agree with the mandatory reset between reps.your body will show you this as you start moving greater weights as you progress.

just as an aside though,i feel like the best ab workout i get is deadlifts on my warm up set(touch and go light weight).real burn after 8 reps.could almost be an entire core workout i think lol.

touch and go would certainly have its place but deadlift properly for optimal repsonse.