T Nation

Total Hip Replacement Anyone Have One?


#1
I'm 46 and had one about 4 years ago.  Everything went well and no problems since.  My leg/lower back training consist of leg extensions and curls and LIGHT stiff legged deads and partial leg presses. On occasion I will do DB stiff legged deads, good morns or back raises but they are all done light and not to failure. No full range movements either on the deads and leg presses.  I am afraid of prematurely wearing out the joint if I train too heavy.

I have become bored with my training for legs and lower back. I have been looking on the web for info on the web how to seriously train legs with THR but cannot find any info. Any ideas would be helpful. Thanks in advance.


#2

I had total hip replacement in august 2006. At the time I was no longer lifting but using bodyweight exercises and a total gym. I have practiced karate and was back in the dojo in 7 weeks. I was 52 at the time and am now 55. This past year I was convinced by my two sons to return to lifting and have been thrilled to rediscover the enjoyment and grounding effects of hefting iron. I also discovered that despite having knee arthritis and a fake hip that I can train legs again by doing leg extensions, leg curls, and box squats. Squating again after so many years makes me feel born again. Yeah, I am currently only reppin 10 with 225, but on a fake hip I am thrilled. I have bee able to practice karate with no issues what ever.

Do the box squats to almost, but not quite parallel.Keep the back tight when you hit the box and be careful to sit so as to not allow the knee to travel beyond the toes. Trust me it can be done. I started with the bar. We may never squat 3 plates again, but if you use pre-exhaust of leg extensions before squats you can train hard without injury. Good luck and keep me posted on your progress.


#3

Here’s a How To video that I found helpful.


#4

Josann,
Thanks for the advice on the box squats. Will keep you posted.


#5

I had THR - left side - in March of this year. I am 48 years old. I gave it a couple of months before I began working out again. For the first couple of weeks I simply used machines as I was terrified of popping it out of joint. I started machine squatting and DLing after approximately 2 weeks. My form sucks and I will keep it light until I get my form back. My doc told me on my 1 month follow up that the type of hip he gave me had been tested with a simulated wear test and there was virtually no wear after a simulated 35 years. I decided to also have my shoulder fixed (arthroscopically) a couple of weeks ago so, I will be keeping it light for a while. Keep us posted on your progress.


#6

Jimg21:
How are you doing with the squats? hope they can be done by you.

T-M324:
Great work. Trust me, it will get better with hard work, proper rest and time.


#7

I am also interested in feedback on this. I will go in on April 15 for THR on the left side. I am looking forward to losing the limp I have lived with since an unfortunate rugby tackle, but am concerned about what I can do afterwards.

TQB


#8

I got a question about THR. There is a 39y old female friend of mine wanting to get in shape. She had a THR a long while back after a car accident. Would something like bodyweight squats and hip thrusts be appropriate for her to start with? She has no previous training experience and does not currently have access to a gym.
Thanks for any opinions.


#9

[quote]Kai9ne wrote:
I got a question about THR. There is a 39y old female friend of mine wanting to get in shape. She had a THR a long while back after a car accident. Would something like bodyweight squats and hip thrusts be appropriate for her to start with? She has no previous training experience and does not currently have access to a gym.
Thanks for any opinions. [/quote]

Without doubt. She can do bodyweight, working on increasing depth over time. She should do stretching, walking stairs, lunges, whatever she is comfortable with. The goal is to get the legs as strong as possible, not only for looks but for health and quality of life.