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Total Beginner Training Help

So my sister wants to begin to workout with me at the gym and she wants to do some cardio and some strength training.
I was wondering how a 1 day or 2 day split should look like for a total beginner.
Which exercises, how many reps, sets etc?

Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.

New rules of lifting for women, it’s a lot more than just a routine and will help with the learning process… Or any new rules books since Alwyn has said many times that sex really doesn’t matter with those series, but new rules for women may make her feel more comfortable to start.

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.[/quote]

You have a 365 Squat and a 365 Deadlift, post your questions in the beginners section, and your name is learning to lift you could easily be considered one of the uneducated retards… But take that,with a grain of salt.

OP as suggested above for a beginner learning to lift stronglifts or starting strength are great beginner routines. How ever the one that was suggested up from his head I disagree with in general and should be pretty much thrown to way side. 5x5 is going to allow slightly heavier weights to be used therefore targeting strength and CNS stimulation better than 3x10 sets will. 3x10 can,be great for assistance moves but as a main movement for a beginner no go. Also 5x5 will allow better form due to slightly less muscle fatigue during each set allowing proper form to be used with heavier weight allowing slightly more training volume which as a fresh beginner she will benefit from greatly

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.[/quote]
lol

[quote]Reed wrote:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.[/quote]

You have a 365 Squat and a 365 Deadlift, post your questions in the beginners section, and your name is learning to lift you could easily be considered one of the uneducated retards… But take that,with a grain of salt.

OP as suggested above for a beginner learning to lift stronglifts or starting strength are great beginner routines. How ever the one that was suggested up from his head I disagree with in general and should be pretty much thrown to way side. 5x5 is going to allow slightly heavier weights to be used therefore targeting strength and CNS stimulation better than 3x10 sets will. 3x10 can,be great for assistance moves but as a main movement for a beginner no go. Also 5x5 will allow better form due to slightly less muscle fatigue during each set allowing proper form to be used with heavier weight allowing slightly more training volume which as a fresh beginner she will benefit from greatly[/quote]

The reason I said 3x10 was for the repetition amount. The old saying it takes -insert varied number here- of repetitions to remember a movement pattern and -insert greater varied number here- to relearn the movement. Yes 5x5 is 25 and 3x10 is only 5 more but doing 10 in a row creates more of rhythm than five does. I could agree or disagree with 5x5 really. You have to remember, a total beginner might be squatting with buckled knees, heels off the ground and a bent lumbar spine. Wouldn’t want them handling 5x5 weights over 3x10 weights.

BTW I thought 2x bodyweight was still considered beginner… At least nowadays.

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:

[quote]Reed wrote:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.[/quote]

You have a 365 Squat and a 365 Deadlift, post your questions in the beginners section, and your name is learning to lift you could easily be considered one of the uneducated retards… But take that,with a grain of salt.

OP as suggested above for a beginner learning to lift stronglifts or starting strength are great beginner routines. How ever the one that was suggested up from his head I disagree with in general and should be pretty much thrown to way side. 5x5 is going to allow slightly heavier weights to be used therefore targeting strength and CNS stimulation better than 3x10 sets will. 3x10 can,be great for assistance moves but as a main movement for a beginner no go. Also 5x5 will allow better form due to slightly less muscle fatigue during each set allowing proper form to be used with heavier weight allowing slightly more training volume which as a fresh beginner she will benefit from greatly[/quote]

The reason I said 3x10 was for the repetition amount. The old saying it takes -insert varied number here- of repetitions to remember a movement pattern and -insert greater varied number here- to relearn the movement. Yes 5x5 is 25 and 3x10 is only 5 more but doing 10 in a row creates more of rhythm than five does. I could agree or disagree with 5x5 really. You have to remember, a total beginner might be squatting with buckled knees, heels off the ground and a bent lumbar spine. Wouldn’t want them handling 5x5 weights over 3x10 weights.

BTW I thought 2x bodyweight was still considered beginner… At least nowadays.[/quote]

Think about it though you take a empty bar squat 5x5 to really get the movement twice a week. Every week you up by 5 pounds. By the time you get up to reasonable amount of weight say 80lbs (just guessing she is a small female) for 5x5 its been a month and a half of perfect squats. No knee buckle no forward lean just taking a month tl learn the movement with out too much muscle fatigue. But hell I have seen some female beginners who have a hard time going to depth with proper form with nothing but bodyweight can you imagine the form breakdown from a 10 rep set with even a moderate amount. Her main goal should be to learn the movement under a reasonable load… That requires a reasonable load.

I know it’s your sis and not your girl, but…

My girl’s work asked to take pictures of her lifting because she’s the only one, and they want to promote more women… now if they could only get a squat rack

[quote]Reed wrote:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:

[quote]Reed wrote:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Strong Lifts is always a good way to start. Check that out before anything. Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.

A 2-day split would look something like… Monday, Bench press 3x10 that’s 30 reps to build muscle/learn proper form. Follow that with overhead press. Then bent over rows keeping the at least 2 barbell movement per workout rule. Follow the same 3x10 basis on all lifts. Follow up with leg press, preferably one involving quad dominance and less hamstring. For the final exercise do hammer curls.

With that you’ve build a foundation of strength, Bench press for your core lift,overhead press for lockout power, barbell rows to assist lat involvement in the bench, Quads to assist in stability as your entire body is needed in the bench and hammer curls to increase stability in shoulder and elbow.

Wednesday Day: Start with squat 3x10 then deadlift 3x10. Keeping two barbell rule. Follow up with a hamstring machine of your choice 3x10, if you’re god blessed with a glute ham raise machine hop on it for the next movement otherwise do 3x10 lunges/step-ups or hip thrusts. Finish it off with lower back extensions.

This split is the foundation of strength. It’s up to you to learn the lifts properly and take full Advantage of them. Each day has 4 exercises 12 sets total and a total of 40 reps.[/quote]

You have a 365 Squat and a 365 Deadlift, post your questions in the beginners section, and your name is learning to lift you could easily be considered one of the uneducated retards… But take that,with a grain of salt.

OP as suggested above for a beginner learning to lift stronglifts or starting strength are great beginner routines. How ever the one that was suggested up from his head I disagree with in general and should be pretty much thrown to way side. 5x5 is going to allow slightly heavier weights to be used therefore targeting strength and CNS stimulation better than 3x10 sets will. 3x10 can,be great for assistance moves but as a main movement for a beginner no go. Also 5x5 will allow better form due to slightly less muscle fatigue during each set allowing proper form to be used with heavier weight allowing slightly more training volume which as a fresh beginner she will benefit from greatly[/quote]

The reason I said 3x10 was for the repetition amount. The old saying it takes -insert varied number here- of repetitions to remember a movement pattern and -insert greater varied number here- to relearn the movement. Yes 5x5 is 25 and 3x10 is only 5 more but doing 10 in a row creates more of rhythm than five does. I could agree or disagree with 5x5 really. You have to remember, a total beginner might be squatting with buckled knees, heels off the ground and a bent lumbar spine. Wouldn’t want them handling 5x5 weights over 3x10 weights.

BTW I thought 2x bodyweight was still considered beginner… At least nowadays.[/quote]

Think about it though you take a empty bar squat 5x5 to really get the movement twice a week. Every week you up by 5 pounds. By the time you get up to reasonable amount of weight say 80lbs (just guessing she is a small female) for 5x5 its been a month and a half of perfect squats. No knee buckle no forward lean just taking a month tl learn the movement with out too much muscle fatigue. But hell I have seen some female beginners who have a hard time going to depth with proper form with nothing but bodyweight can you imagine the form breakdown from a 10 rep set with even a moderate amount. Her main goal should be to learn the movement under a reasonable load… That requires a reasonable load.[/quote]

I could go on to explain that there’s reasons to do 3x10 but I won’t Lets agree to disagree. If there is anything we’ve learned is that there’s no end all be all way to teach someone to lift. Oh btw what if the girl is fat. Adding weight to bad joints is a nono. Anywhooo. Yea I could agree with 5x5 or 3x10. Based on just about 0 info given from op.

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
I could go on to explain that there’s reasons to do 3x10 but I won’t Lets agree to disagree. If there is anything we’ve learned is that there’s no end all be all way to teach someone to lift. Oh btw what if the girl is fat. Adding weight to bad joints is a nono. Anywhooo. Yea I could agree with 5x5 or 3x10. Based on just about 0 info given from op.
[/quote]
Although 5x5 is better than 3x10 for beginners according to most trainers, that isn’t what I found funny about your program. Think about this:

A guy comes and says his sister wants to start working out doing some resistance training and conditioning, and your response is to give him a program centered around the bench press (not even pec hypertrophy, but specifically getting better at a competition style bench press).

What made you think that her goal was building a bigger bench press? Nothing wrong with women that want a big bench, but they aren’t exactly what I picture when we talk about a woman who wants to get into some conditioning and weight training.

[quote]Silyak wrote:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
I could go on to explain that there’s reasons to do 3x10 but I won’t Lets agree to disagree. If there is anything we’ve learned is that there’s no end all be all way to teach someone to lift. Oh btw what if the girl is fat. Adding weight to bad joints is a nono. Anywhooo. Yea I could agree with 5x5 or 3x10. Based on just about 0 info given from op.
[/quote]
Although 5x5 is better than 3x10 for beginners according to most trainers, that isn’t what I found funny about your program. Think about this:

A guy comes and says his sister wants to start working out doing some resistance training and conditioning, and your response is to give him a program centered around the bench press (not even pec hypertrophy, but specifically getting better at a competition style bench press).

What made you think that her goal was building a bigger bench press? Nothing wrong with women that want a big bench, but they aren’t exactly what I picture when we talk about a woman who wants to get into some conditioning and weight training. [/quote]

Bench was a bare bones example because everyone knows what the bench is. Competition is the safest bench and won’t build a significant amount of chest muscle. Not that women can produce much anyhow, however it will build a tight upper body foundation… He said STRENGTH. I take the term literally. Btw did you even read the second part that was about lower body?

Stronglifts is a good routine. If you get her started on it, there’s a few things to bear in mind. Mehdi considers it a temporary routine that you “graduate” from and he recommends modifying it at a few key points or switching to another program (he endorses madcow once you reach intermediate level).

Stronglifts is 5x5, 3 day/week. For each lift, 5 lbs are added each session. squats are done in every session, so 15 lbs are added in each week to squats; with the frequency of the other lifts, 15 lbs are added in each 2-week cycle. Inevitably, progress stalls and when this happens he suggests starting over with lower weight, progressing in smaller increments, or switching to 3x5 or 1x5.

You can find this information and the full routine on his site, but some of it takes some digging to find

[quote]sgmtn wrote:
So my sister wants to begin to workout with me at the gym and she wants to do some cardio and some strength training.
I was wondering how a 1 day or 2 day split should look like for a total beginner.
Which exercises, how many reps, sets etc?[/quote]
How old is she, what’s her height, weight (if you know roundabout), and general fat level (not a percentage, but muffin top/pudgy, average frame, skinny, in shape/lean, etc.?) What are her exact goals? And if you say “to tone up”, I’ll kick a kitten in the neck.

I like starting with a basic bodyweight workout for most beginners. I’ve written it around a bunch before, usually for teens, but it’s useful for any relatively-untrained newbie. You can do a lot for her strength, body, and confidence just progressing her up to a few good push-ups, for example (always legs straight, never “girl push-ups” on the knees. Elevate the hands onto a bench to make them easier).

When you say “a 1 or 2 day split”, does that mean she’ll only be in the gym 1 or 2 days a week, or, how often do you guys plan on going? That makes a bit of a difference, but generally a full body or upper/lower split will be plenty. The most basic template for a full body workout is:
A) Lower body lift (squat or deadlift variation)
B) Upper body push (chest or shoulder exercise)
C) Upper body pull (back exercise)

1 or 2 exercises per movement. I like Chad Waterbury’s concept of keeping each exercise around 30 reps total volume, usually with low-to-moderate reps per set (so, multiple sets of 4-8). Some “dessert” exercises at the end of a few sessions each week would be fine (“beach stuff”, 10-15 minutes of “free time”, etc.).

Or, as was suggested, Cosgrove’s New Rules for Women is a very good resource. Here’s a thread where some ladies discussed it a few years ago:

[quote]Learning2Lift wrote:
Also take everything you get off this forum with a grain of salt, some of these guys are retarded/uneducated in this field.[/quote]
Who the hell are you to make a statement like this? There are some very sharp guys offering solid info here in the Beginners forum and throughout the site.

I’m seriously tempted to pick apart the problems with every bit of “advice” you just posted. But to avoid hijacking this thread, I’ll simply say that I disagree with almost everything you suggested. Based on this thread and others you’ve chimed in on, you should not be giving advice until you have more experience.