T Nation

Too Many Compounds in a Workout?


#1

I'm aware that compound moves are best for muscle growth, as they stimulate the most microtrauma in the muscle and you can shift the most weight with them. However, would it be excessive to be doing 6 compounds in one workout? I.e. for the upper/lower I'm on at the moment (2 of each per week), is this excessive?

Chins
Military Press
DB Bent over row
DB Bench
Dips
Cable upright row

Or would it be better to replace a couple of the compounds with isos?

As I'm only working the upper body 2x per week, my gut tells me that I should really beast it hard with as much work as possible in each session, provided it lasts no more than about 45-50 minutes.


#2

Noway don't even think about isolation movements in an upper/lower, this looks good, what does your lower body split look like?


#3

The leg day revolves around something like this:

Squat Variation
Deadlift Variation
Weighted step-ups OR les press
Machine leg extensions
Machine hamstring curls
Calves raises


#4

I strongly disagree with this

OP, if you have a weak body part, I'd include an isolation for it, replacing either the dips or the db bench (probably the dips) which stress roughly the same muscles. You're doing a lot for your chest and triceps compared to biceps IMO, but you are hitting everything you need to at least a little.


#5

If you're training upper body two times a week, I would spread these compounds over two different upper body sessions.

Allthough you can't go wrong with compounds, I believe there is a point of diminishing returns when you include that many compound movements in one session. The more compounds you have, the lesser your intensity would be per movement which in turn will diminish the movement's effectiveness and efficiency.

I think it's going to be more beneficial to take three big movements, hit these with full force and then do some "beach work" like curls, raises, flyes, tricep work,...


#6

I'd say ditch the cable upright row and replace it with a biceps (curl) exercise. If you want to stick to the basics do either alternating DB curls, or standing BB curls.

That way you've got an exercise for just about all of your major upper body muscle groups (assuming you are doing the dips with an upright torso, in order to focus on your triceps).

That is, unless you've got overpowering biceps and relatively small traps/shoulders. Then maybe keep the upright rows.


#7

LOL. We're back to the "good" old days now......


#8

amazing isn't it


#9

It is! I saw his previous post saying a certain program was worthless because it included hammer strength machines, and thought he was kidding there lol. MAybe he's just playing, no one could be that clueless after reading half the shit on these forums, but whatever.


#10

Haha you're very optimistic about people on the interwebs.


#11

So you guys are saying that 6 compounds advice is nonsense? Must admit that 5 felt a bit much, let alone 6. Am tempted to go with 1 of each of the following compounds: vertical push, vertical pull, horizontal push, horizontal pull, then a biceps and triceps iso at the end.


#12

The main components of my two -more or less westside based- upper body workouts are:

A
ME Horizontal Push(5/3/1)
Heavy Horizontal Pull (4-5x5-8)
Lateral raises or some variation (4x8-12)
Random work (Biceps/Triceps/Rear Delts)

B
Heavy Vertical Push (4-5x5-8)
Vertical Pull (40-50 reps in as little sets as possible)
Horizontal Push (4x8-12)
Random work (Biceps/Triceps/Rear Delts)

Mostly I choose two of the three bodyparts (most of the time it will include rear delts)for random work and do 3 sets for each. Compounds are kept at 4 per session at most and I still will have hit everything in some way each session. Works pretty well for me, but of course it all depends on what your goals are.


#13

Personally, I wou..

..Ah, fuck it.


#14

The program was worthless you faggot, it was utter rubbish, it was comprised of 80% machines, I used hammer strength chest press machine as an example along with a few others.

Secondly, to Sentoguy, this guys got chins (at the start) along with DB BOR and upright rows, his biceps are definitely getting enough, no need for some beach work man.


#15

We are officially back to the dark days of T-Nation. Rejoice everyone, rejoice! machine exercises and isolation lawl!

Here's a trick question, is this guy just a clueless noob who began lifting weights a few months back or a half hearted troll?

YOur clues are:
A. english is obviously not his first language...and
B. he's spewing horsecrap on this thread - intentionally or otherwise.

I vote for having some fun with this guy.


#16

Funny, that's exactly what I'm thinking almost every time one of these threads pops up.


#17

We have a clueless cat in here after a long time. Show some excitement, damn it.


#18

Eh, let's be a bit more optimistic, I don't think T-Nation is heading all the way back to the Dark Ages again. Most people have gotten the message. I hope not at least, I know I was led astray because of that and pretty much wasted a year of good muscle-building time.


#19

You wanna neglect your arms, feel free. But don't go telling others to do the same. This topic has been done to death, so I'm not going to get into it yet again.

OP, look at all of the best developed arms in BB'ing, they all did direct work to get them to that point. Enough said.


#20

i would suggest doing alot of curls. they really help you build mass better than compounds or whatever.