T Nation

Too Harsh?


#1

I just posted this blog over on my site: neversate.com/wrath/2015/9/22/7-random-thoughts-1 and have gotten some pushback saying that it is too harsh...I have said much more poignant and corse things in my log regularly. Does anyone feel offended by what I wrote? I am honestly confused on this one. I am not going to change it, but feedback is good.


#2

Not offended once lol good little write up.


#3

No. I’ve seen worse.


#4

I don’t think it was too harsh - it may have been a little harsh, but is that a bad thing? I know for a fact that I try to live according to certain principles (many of which are pretty well summed up in that list), but that some days I do a lot better than others. Usually if I’m in a frame of mind to be offended by something like that article, that’s when I need to hear it the most.

By the way, when I was over on your site I reread that overhead press article you wrote a little while back. I meant to tell you this at the time, but there’s some really helpful stuff in there. Pressing is something I struggle with, so thanks for that.


#5

i dont see anything wrong with what you wrote


#6

I don’t see how it’s harsh - if people are genuinely offended it’s becuase they like hiding from the truth of what you wrote…


#7

Harsh??? Not at all, all I see is motivation! Good post, thoughtful and well written.


#8

Nothing wrong at all with what you wrote.
Keep it up.


#9

I pity anyone that felt that your blog post was harsh.

Perhaps it’s a case of ‘small fish-itis’.


#10

Everything is on point. People these days are so fucking coddled and politically correct that they get offended at basic life rules like the ones you wrote.

Although I think its totally fair to call the 19 year olds that deadlift 750 genetic freaks.

I like what Jim Wendler said in his blog: “Hell, there are actually adults out there telling OTHER ADULTS what words they can or cannot say. The fucking ego on people these days. Unbelievable”


#11

Nope, it was a good post.


#12

Thanks everyone, I really appreciate the feedback. It means a lot and I definitely feel better about it


#13

[quote]Alpha wrote:
Thanks everyone, I really appreciate the feedback. It means a lot and I definitely feel better about it [/quote]

I enjoyed the post as usual. Sounded fine to me. Just hand them one of these.


#14

Damn… I need to get me one of those shirts!


#15

I’m a bit confused as to what type of person would regularly read your blog, and also believe that’s harsh, or out of character, or offensive in any way. shrug


#16

I don’t think it’s “too harsh”, but I don’t agree with a couple of things.

"NUMBER 2. If you are hurt, tired or for any other reason, not at 100% capacity - but choose to try anyway - NEVER use those things as a reason why you didn’t perform up to the standard you thought you should achieve. An excuse is still an excuse. People who rely on this think that doing so will somehow separate them from their poor performance, but it won’t. All it really does is make you look weak.

i.e. “I Could’ve/Should’ve/Would’ve won first, but my back has been bothering me.” Cowards blame other people and things for their shortcomings. Don’t be a coward. Be proud of your performance, learn from it, and do what is necessary to get better. You got beat because you were not the best competitor that day. Lying to yourself won’t take the sting out of the loss or make you any better of a person. "

You have to be realistic. Look at Reed who messed up his hip and still squatted a meet PR (although less than he was going for) and had to deadlift to conventional. He sounded like he was beating himself up over it, but considering the circumstances he did pretty fucking good. Or Mike Tuchscherer, who had a whole bunch of injuries that even prevented him from training lower body for a month but still managed to pull things together and place 4th at IPF worlds. Sure he didn’t either set a new WR or win, but there is nothing cowardly about blaming his injuries - it’s the truth, how any other are still at an elite level after a number of injuries?


#17

I clicked submit by accident.

"NUMBER 7. Remove “if”, “can’t” and “but” from your language. Take responsibility for your actions. Don’t say, “I would try that but…” or “I could do that too if …” - Rather say, “I am unwilling to try.” or “I refuse to do that.” - In reality, you are probably just too afraid to fail, so you won’t even try.

Save yourself and everyone else around you the time. If qualifiers and excuses are how you want to live your life, then that is fine. I wish you the best of luck. But please realize that people do not have the time to listen to your reasons of why you are unwilling to give something a shot. Excuses are the bastard product of a weak will and mind. Either you choose to do something and give it 100% of your effort… or you don’t. "

Everyone could train 3-4 hours a day IF they don’t have a wife, kids, or a job. Or if they quit sleeping. Some people can’t maintain a regular schedule because other things get in the way, and as important as training is you can’t put that ahead of life itself. By the way, I train 5 days a week and never miss a day, even if I’m sick or injured I will still do something. I prioritize training over my job, but not everyone can get away with that.

So I agree with the basic idea of what you’re saying about not being a pussy and making excuses for everything, but sometimes you really can’t do something for a good reason. Not harsh at all, but maybe not totally realistic.


#18

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:
I don’t think it’s “too harsh”, but I don’t agree with a couple of things.

"NUMBER 2. If you are hurt, tired or for any other reason, not at 100% capacity - but choose to try anyway - NEVER use those things as a reason why you didn’t perform up to the standard you thought you should achieve. An excuse is still an excuse. People who rely on this think that doing so will somehow separate them from their poor performance, but it won’t. All it really does is make you look weak.

i.e. “I Could’ve/Should’ve/Would’ve won first, but my back has been bothering me.” Cowards blame other people and things for their shortcomings. Don’t be a coward. Be proud of your performance, learn from it, and do what is necessary to get better. You got beat because you were not the best competitor that day. Lying to yourself won’t take the sting out of the loss or make you any better of a person. "

You have to be realistic. Look at Reed who messed up his hip and still squatted a meet PR (although less than he was going for) and had to deadlift to conventional. He sounded like he was beating himself up over it, but considering the circumstances he did pretty fucking good. Or Mike Tuchscherer, who had a whole bunch of injuries that even prevented him from training lower body for a month but still managed to pull things together and place 4th at IPF worlds. Sure he didn’t either set a new WR or win, but there is nothing cowardly about blaming his injuries - it’s the truth, how any other are still at an elite level after a number of injuries?

[/quote]

I don’t feel like either of those guys blamed their injuries for their performance though. A lot of Mike’s writing seem more focused on blaming the poor decisions that led him to get injured rather than the injuries themselves.

EDIT: Alpha, I feel like the only people that would consider that post harsh are the people who haven’t quite realized these things yet. It’s all true stuff. Unpleasant, but real.


#19

Yea, the point I was making had nothing to do with the individual’s actual performance. Injuries and other things happen. What i am stating is that, you should not go around taking about what you “Could” or “would” have done if the circumstances were ideal.

I am sure you have heard it a lot. Guys saying things like, “I would have done better, but I had a hard weight cut…” etc. The bottom line is that they did not do better, so they shouldn’t try to qualify their poor performance. or when guys try to justify how they are going to do BEFORE the comp, saying things like, “I am not at my best, so i probably will not do very well.” They think it is going to give them a way out when they do not perform well, but in reality, i think they are just trying to soften the blow to their ego rather than taking a true subjective look at what they need to do to perform better next time.

All I am saying is to be proud of the work you out there. It was your best that day. Saying that you could have done better is like having the best of intentions. It may make the individual feel better about how they did, but it doesn’t change the facts of the end result. Actions speak much louder than any excuse people give.

Anyone who reads my log knows that I am a fan of both Reed and Mike. And i don’t believe either acted like the individual I am trying to portray in the example.

As far as #7…Again, i think, you read it differently than I intended. My basic premise was to take responsibility for your actions and stop blaming others and things because you aren’t where you want to be in life.

If you are trying to be one of the best in the world, then you are going to have to sacrifice just about everything else in your life to get there. Most people are not trying to be the best in the world. They are just trying to get as good as possible in the parameters which they are not willing to sacrifice. Like you said, most people are not willing to give up certain things because they goals they set do not require it. But the best guys in the world do. Changing the way you phrase things, changes the reality of those things. This happens when an individual takes responsibility for the choices they have made… so rather than saying, “I could be the best X in the nation IF I didn’t have a full-time job.” they would say, “My desire for the safety and security of a full-time job is greater than my desire to be the best in the nation.” The best people in any field have this outlook and i am just trying to get people to shift the blame so that they can be an active participant in changing there circumstances instead of looking at themselves as a victim.

I am not saying you are wrong or that your priorities are not correct, all I am stating is that, no matter how big or small your goal is, don’t walk around blaming your circumstances or previous life choices because you are not where you want to be in life.

We can agree to disagree on this, and I mean no disrespect, but hopefully that added some clarification.


#20

Thanks Pwnisher. That is a really good point. I still struggle with a lot of these things myself…I think we all do, but I am trying to take control of the situation and making a public declaration of such is a big step toward accountability.

I know you get this stuff from reading your blog and your training log. You live out this stuff every day.