TJ Lynch on Bulking Up for Naturals

So much for constantly reaching “top weights”.

my question is why did he find the need to bulk up to 278lbs, assuming this was post contest where he said he stepped on stage at 205lbs. did a “professional” bodybuilder not notice that he was getting fat from a 73lbs gain?

Surely that’s another case of ‘do as I say and not as I do’ though,

If he bulked up in the past, then isn’t that proof that it works?

He bulked up EXCESSIVELY to 278 pounds and weighed in a contest a measly two pounds more than the previous contest.

Of course it’s necessary to bulk up in the offseason, just not excessively, I believe.

Bulking to 70+ lbs over contest weight is probably excessive - but where do you draw the line? A 205lbs contest shape bber who weighs 220 offseason (15lbs as he suggests) is maybe 12% BF which is pretty damn lean. That’s got to have some negative effects on progress once you are already legitimitely ‘big’

[quote]Tom240 wrote:
Surely that’s another case of ‘do as I say and not as I do’ though,

If he bulked up in the past, then isn’t that proof that it works?[/quote]

Good point.

Also, I do believe we have touched on maintaining a certain weight for long enough for your body to find that as “normal”. I personally wouldn’t expect to hold onto much that I gained if I was dieting back down within a couple of months of putting it on.

brick im interested on your thoughts of how heavy a natural should train. if you dont want to clutter this thread i can start a new one though.

ive been watching some videos of naturals training and noticed they go pretty damn heavy in the low rep range, so-so form, and always try and add more weight. guys like skip la cour, jeff willet, mike o’hearn, layne norton are all pretty big for naturals. jim cordova and dr. joe are the only natural ones ive seen that concentrate on going lighter like 6-10 rep range and concentrating on good form.

then i see the IFBB pros still lifting heavy but in higher rep ranges like 8-15 and they advocate “feeling the movement” with good form and not worrying about weight.

just curious on your thoughts!

[quote]wannabebig250 wrote:
brick im interested on your thoughts of how heavy a natural should train. if you dont want to clutter this thread i can start a new one though.

ive been watching some videos of naturals training and noticed they go pretty damn heavy in the low rep range, so-so form, and always try and add more weight. guys like skip la cour, jeff willet, mike o’hearn, layne norton are all pretty big for naturals. jim cordova and dr. joe are the only natural ones ive seen that concentrate on going lighter like 6-10 rep range and concentrating on good form.

then i see the IFBB pros still lifting heavy but in higher rep ranges like 8-15 and they advocate “feeling the movement” with good form and not worrying about weight.

just curious on your thoughts![/quote]

Heavier weight is known to be better for preserving/‘saving’ muscle(while dieting), and since that is a very key issue for naturals I’d suspect that to be their primary reason.

I’m not an expert and would love to hear from our resident natural pro on this subject further though, or others who follow the natural circuit closely and can give a more concrete/detailed answer.

[quote]wannabebig250 wrote:
brick im interested on your thoughts of how heavy a natural should train. if you dont want to clutter this thread i can start a new one though.

ive been watching some videos of naturals training and noticed they go pretty damn heavy in the low rep range, so-so form, and always try and add more weight. guys like skip la cour, jeff willet, mike o’hearn, layne norton are all pretty big for naturals. jim cordova and dr. joe are the only natural ones ive seen that concentrate on going lighter like 6-10 rep range and concentrating on good form.

then i see the IFBB pros still lifting heavy but in higher rep ranges like 8-15 and they advocate “feeling the movement” with good form and not worrying about weight.

just curious on your thoughts![/quote]

I’m flattered you ask me. Thanks! I consider myself someone TRYING to be an expert. And it dawned on me this past year, "How the heck am I gonna be an expert on this thing I love if I haven’t experienced it (competing)? I aim to have a private dietetics counseling biz (and a website for it) and want to one day be a prep coach. Nutrition counseling for general fitness, or in the case of disease management with dietetics, one need not be shredded to the bone or some ourtageous physical specimen. But for contest prep, I think that’s the one part of nutrition someone needs experiene with in order to counself for it.

Anyway, let’s get this clear: Mike O’hearn, Skip La Cour, and Jeff Willet haven’t been natural in a long time. And judging from his current stats and look, I’m not sure if Layne Norton is natural any longer. This isn’t said to be dismissive because after all, these guys are great bodybuilders and I personally don’t give a rat’s ass who’s natural or not so long as those assisted don’t sneak their way into natural competitions or call themselves natural when they are no longer or have just been clean for a measly year. There are some so-called natural feds that allow competitors to compete if they’ve been natural for a year, which is a joke considering heavy duty steroid use changes your ability to gain muscle FOREVER.

Currently I’m training for my first powerlifting meet in November. My current routine is also yielding some good size gains although I’ll be switching over to BB training immediately after because I’m aiming to compete in natural BB in late June. Most naturals I know or know of train in the the standard 6 to 15 rep range depending on the bodypart, exercise, or their situation (“taking it easy” at times to deload or because of injury).

I don’t see that much of a need for a bodybuilder to train with reps lower than 6. I’ve never been fond of Max OT which Skip La Cour and Jeff Willet do. 4 to 6 reps for arm exercises or lateral raises? Not my cup of tea! As Cephalic Carnage once pointed out, guys who practice Max OT have some glaring weakness, particularly in the arms and medial delts department.

Arms and legs are muscle groups that seem to respond to higher reps and “the pump”.

Obviously for some exercises such as standard deadlifts, squats, and barbellrows, a slow, deliberate motion isn’t practical. But for a lot of other exercises, I believe it’s important to peform a bit slow, more deliberate motion and to “feel the muscle”. Even in my current PL program I do this for some of my assistance exercises.

I know O’ Hearn and Norton have their hybrid PL-BB routines (Norton developed his PHAT routine) and they’ve worked, as they’ll probably work for some time for most. As CT said, any rational program performed with high effort will yield results.

gaining as much muscle and strength as fast as possible is the quickest way to get to your goals and in this guys case that may well have been getting up to 278 lbs. Thoughts here got heavy before he first competed as did stu, only after competing is that they kept their weight close to contest condition.

[quote]myself1992 wrote:
gaining as much muscle and strength as fast as possible is the quickest way to get to your goals and in this guys case that may well have been getting up to 278 lbs. Thoughts here got heavy before he first competed as did stu, only after competing is that they kept their weight close to contest condition.[/quote]

Again, bulking up to 278 had him a measly TWO POUNDS heavier than his previous competition. Did anyone watch the full video?

How necessary is it to bulk to 278 to compete at 205 and take an EIGHT MONTH prep to do so. Again, did anyone see the whole thing?

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
How necessary is it to bulk to 278 to compete at 205 and take an EIGHT MONTH prep to do so. Again, did anyone see the whole thing?[/quote]

Yep - it’s obviously not neccesary. If he lost all that fat and wound up with only 2 pounds of additional muscle for the effort than it clearly wasn’t worth it. And unless he lost a lot of muscle dropping down some 70 pounds, holding the weight would be irrelevant. Holding fat to stay at a specific weight makes no sense…

trudat, 70lbs + an 8 month contest prep is too excessive for 2 lbs. This means he was about 30% bf give or take.

Don’t get me wrong bulking is cool. I’ve added a lot of mass pretty quickly compared to most I see in the gym looking the same from year to year. But I myself got to 30% and I feel like it had an adverse affect on my health (hormonally and emotionally) and I probably could have made the same results with a little less fat gain. I mean shit I am catching hell for it now.

spent 6 months going from 255 to 225. and I’m still about 20% and I’ll have to drop probably another 20lbs just to see 12% and spend the rest of the year doing it.

But at the same time when I think about it. While i was gaining most of my mass I had no idea how to eat. I thought I was doing it the right way. All i knew was eat eat eat tons of protein. In fact my first year to a year and a half I remember trying to stay lean and gain muscle and it just was not happening.

I don’t think every one watched the whole video as he doesn’t advocate trying to add 80lbs as he did. He states that he doesn’t believe that to be healthy or ideal. To me it just sounded like he said he’s done it before and doesn’t recommend it. Though the 15lbs he does advocate seems a little conservative to me too.

OT: How bad did pony tail want to blow him? lol

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]Tom240 wrote:
Surely that’s another case of ‘do as I say and not as I do’ though,

If he bulked up in the past, then isn’t that proof that it works?[/quote]

Good point.

Also, I do believe we have touched on maintaining a certain weight for long enough for your body to find that as “normal”. I personally wouldn’t expect to hold onto much that I gained if I was dieting back down within a couple of months of putting it on.[/quote]

Then how shouuld one go about competing once or twice a year considering it requires dieting down only months after making some gains in the offseason?

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]Tom240 wrote:
Surely that’s another case of ‘do as I say and not as I do’ though,

If he bulked up in the past, then isn’t that proof that it works?[/quote]

Good point.

Also, I do believe we have touched on maintaining a certain weight for long enough for your body to find that as “normal”. I personally wouldn’t expect to hold onto much that I gained if I was dieting back down within a couple of months of putting it on.[/quote]

Then how shouuld one go about competing once or twice a year considering it requires dieting down only months after making some gains in the offseason? [/quote]

I don’t subscribe to the whole maintain a certain weight until your body adapts to it philosophy. Im either losing fat or gaining muscle. I prefer doing 12 week bulk cycles followed by an aggressive 4 week mini cut cycle. I typically aim for 1 lb a week while in the bulking phase and a weight loss of 1-1.5 lbs per week during the cut phase. This has pretty much allowed me to stay within 15 lbs of contest weight year round. Probably gained about 30 lbs with no increase in body fat % over the last 2 years.

Also worth mentioning Layne Norton does something similar although in shorter phases. Also Shelby Starnes and Thibs have talked about approaches similar to this where they bulk up to a certain body fat then cut back down to there starting point then repeat the cycle.

[quote]Matthaeus wrote:

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]Tom240 wrote:
Surely that’s another case of ‘do as I say and not as I do’ though,

If he bulked up in the past, then isn’t that proof that it works?[/quote]

Good point.

Also, I do believe we have touched on maintaining a certain weight for long enough for your body to find that as “normal”. I personally wouldn’t expect to hold onto much that I gained if I was dieting back down within a couple of months of putting it on.[/quote]

Then how shouuld one go about competing once or twice a year considering it requires dieting down only months after making some gains in the offseason? [/quote]

I don’t subscribe to the whole maintain a certain weight until your body adapts to it philosophy. Im either losing fat or gaining muscle. I prefer doing 12 week bulk cycles followed by an aggressive 4 week mini cut cycle. I typically aim for 1 lb a week while in the bulking phase and a weight loss of 1-1.5 lbs per week during the cut phase. This has pretty much allowed me to stay within 15 lbs of contest weight year round. Probably gained about 30 lbs with no increase in body fat % over the last 2 years.

Also worth mentioning Layne Norton does something similar although in shorter phases. Also Shelby Starnes and Thibs have talked about approaches similar to this where they bulk up to a certain body fat then cut back down to there starting point then repeat the cycle.[/quote]

Very good post.

“I don’t subscribe to the whole maintain a certain weight until your body adapts to it philosophy. Im either losing fat or gaining muscle.” I don’t know where this came from either.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]myself1992 wrote:
gaining as much muscle and strength as fast as possible is the quickest way to get to your goals and in this guys case that may well have been getting up to 278 lbs. Thoughts here got heavy before he first competed as did stu, only after competing is that they kept their weight close to contest condition.[/quote]

Again, bulking up to 278 had him a measly TWO POUNDS heavier than his previous competition. Did anyone watch the full video? [/quote]

yeah saw it again and you’re right, I thought that he had gone that heavy before dieting down for his first show. I believe that you have to compete first before being able to only get about 20 lbs heavier in the offseason than you would for your show, because if you don’t “bulk” before your first time competing then it’s gonna take you a hell of a long time to get to the same level.

Brick is dropping knowledge bombs all over this thread.