T Nation

Tissue Healing Process

Hi all I’m trying to learn more about what happens to our connective tissue after trauma. Examples after a strain,tear, etc etc how/what is the bodies healing process for this. Also if theres any type of “memory” to this per se. Say straining a muscle then every so often it flaring up again. How structural imbalances can lead to problomatic issues? Any info would help…thanks in advance

I am not a doctor and do not claim to have any researched knowledge about your question.

But I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night. LOL

I had a tear in a tendon on my foot. The foot doctor told me as follows:

During the healing process 6-8 weeks, the tendon grows back with tissue that has the consistency of snot (mucous). It is a very soft tissue and will tear very easily. So you need to immobilize the tendon while it is healing. If you strain it or move it very much it will tear while it is in this soft tissue state. As it begins to harden you can very slowly introduce slight movement to it. For example he had me draw the alphabet by pointing my toe in the air and drawing each imaginary letter. Every few days you can add another set of alphabet drawing to the exercise. If you strain it and tear the healing tissue, you will lengthen the time of recovery. Because it will have to start all over again. When completely healed it will not be as strong as it was before being damaged. My tendon was badly torn but not completely separated. That would probably require surgery to reattach.

That is all I know about your question. I also would be interested in hearing about this from someone with more knowledge of the subject.

[quote]Its All U wrote:
I am not a doctor and do not claim to have any researched knowledge about your question.

But I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night. LOL

I had a tear in a tendon on my foot. The foot doctor told me as follows:

During the healing process 6-8 weeks, the tendon grows back with tissue that has the consistency of snot (mucous). It is a very soft tissue and will tear very easily. So you need to immobilize the tendon while it is healing. If you strain it or move it very much it will tear while it is in this soft tissue state. As it begins to harden you can very slowly introduce slight movement to it. For example he had me draw the alphabet by pointing my toe in the air and drawing each imaginary letter. Every few days you can add another set of alphabet drawing to the exercise. If you strain it and tear the healing tissue, you will lengthen the time of recovery. Because it will have to start all over again. When completely healed it will not be as strong as it was before being damaged. My tendon was badly torn but not completely separated. That would probably require surgery to reattach.

That is all I know about your question. I also would be interested in hearing about this from someone with more knowledge of the subject.[/quote]

You probably healed quickly because of staying at the Holiday Inn…haha

But in all seriousness… I’ve been through that type of process myself and know its a persistent process. Would love to hear more from say A PT or someone well versed in Rehab…

Here’s an overview on Mike Reinold’s blog about soft tissue adhesion, and a brief discussion on the healing process in different structures.

http://www.mikereinold.com/2010/11/soft-tissue-adhesions.html?utm_source=BP_recent