T Nation

Time to Cut Weight


#1

So the first time I ever cut weight was when I was in the first 6 months of my training, (I was powerlifting and wanted to get into a lower weight class) I went from a flabby 196 to an anorexic 160 than filled out soon to the first picture below (165 6-7% bf) I decided to bulk up from there (165 to the 203 in the next photo 18% bf possibly) the first time I cut weight I lost TONS of muscle and DO NOT want that to happen again, I believe I have a solid base now and would be a very nice 175 at 10% or lower. Please aid me in advice and help with the dieting down and what not. (I am natural 5'10 203 18 percent bf 18yo) any advice helps!


#2

Dude, only one pic is showing up.


#3

Sorry about that. This is me heavier (200ish)


#4

obvious troll


#5

I’m getting really fucking fed up with this site, anything ifucking post is marked “troll” what the fuck makes you think I’m trolling? Want pictures of the scale? What the hell can I do?


#6

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:
I’m getting really fucking fed up with this site, anything ifucking post is marked “troll” what the fuck makes you think I’m trolling? Want pictures of the scale? What the hell can I do?[/quote]

Ignore the guy who called you a troll. Wait for some of the smart guys who can offer some diet suggestions (ie not me).

–Me


#7

Here’s one picture of when I was lean. (165ish)


#8

Legs about a month ago (200ish)


#9

I would recommend that you read this article and try following the slower protocol that is outlined for less rapid weight loss: http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/researchapproved_carb_cycling&cr=

The one thing that you should get use to doing is tracking your calories and macros if you want to get meticulous and serious about getting very lean. There are multiple ways to do this, from simply writing everything down on paper, to creating your own spreadsheet, or using a free online app like Myfitnesspal or Livestrong’s Myplate, where you just enter pre-created serving sizes and food selections to tally your daily totals.

The other option is just to figure out maintenance calories, and then opt to stay 250-500 calories below maintenance each day (your choice), set protein at app. 1-1.25 g/lb of bodyweight (4 calories per gram/protein) and adjust the remaining calories to a fat (9 calories per gram) vs. carb (4 calories per gram) balance of your preference, ensuring that you are getting 3-5 days of conditioning work at 30-45 minutes per day. That’s in addition to continuing your chosen strength training regiment, which no one realistically recommends abandoning in favor of total cardio. You could alternate between high and low intensity exercises, or a combination thereof, different people use different protocols and adjust based on observed results.


#10

How would I go about finding my maintenance calories? And what cardio would you recommend? (Stair stepper, treadmill)


#11

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:
How would I go about finding my maintenance calories? And what cardio would you recommend? (Stair stepper, treadmill)[/quote]

You’re going to get different answers, and the legitimate answer is that everyone’s body is different, so exact mileages will vary.

I’ve seen it suggested on here, numerous times, that a good rule of thumb is this:

Read http://www.tnation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/opening_up_the_fat_loss_playbook&cr=

If you don’t want to get technical, you good try this…
10-12 calories/Lb of BM for fat loss
15 cal/lb of BM for maintenance or body recomposition
18 cal/lb of BM for bulking

I think the most sensible cardio is whatever you enjoy. If you hate the elliptical but love sprinting, do sprints. Like hill sprints or pushing a prowler? Do those. Do you love walking? Get up and walk 2-3 miles a few days per week in a fasted state. If you enjoy biking, ride a bike or use the Airdyne. What will challenge you, keep you conditioned, and actually be something that you’d legitimate stick with till you reach your goal?


#12

[quote]JR249 wrote:

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:
How would I go about finding my maintenance calories? And what cardio would you recommend? (Stair stepper, treadmill)[/quote]

You’re going to get different answers, and the legitimate answer is that everyone’s body is different, so exact mileages will vary.

I’ve seen it suggested on here, numerous times, that a good rule of thumb is this:

Read http://www.tnation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/opening_up_the_fat_loss_playbook&cr=

If you don’t want to get technical, you good try this…
10-12 calories/Lb of BM for fat loss
15 cal/lb of BM for maintenance or body recomposition
18 cal/lb of BM for bulking

I think the most sensible cardio is whatever you enjoy. If you hate the elliptical but love sprinting, do sprints. Like hill sprints or pushing a prowler? Do those. Do you love walking? Get up and walk 2-3 miles a few days per week in a fasted state. If you enjoy biking, ride a bike or use the Airdyne. What will challenge you, keep you conditioned, and actually be something that you’d legitimate stick with till you reach your goal?
[/quote]

So I could follow the 10-12 calories per body weight? Or mass? I only have access to a treadmill, stair stepper, walking, and running… We have a track at the highschool that I could use? Also what food should I eat? I’m thinking 6 meals daily, 8 ounces of chicken with broccoli for 5 of those meals and breakfast being 5 whole eggs and half cup of oatmeal, sound good?


#13

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:

So I could follow the 10-12 calories per body weight? Or mass? I only have access to a treadmill, stair stepper, walking, and running… We have a track at the highschool that I could use? Also what food should I eat? I’m thinking 6 meals daily, 8 ounces of chicken with broccoli for 5 of those meals and breakfast being 5 whole eggs and half cup of oatmeal, sound good?[/quote]

I’d start with 12 calories/lb of bodyweight and adjust as you actually get leaner and the scale goes down, e.g., a weekly weigh in. If that doesn’t yield effective results after a few weeks, adjust down to 10 or 11 calories/lb of bodyweight. You can certainly use LBM too, I’ve seen people do both, but if you use LBM I’d go with 12 calories/lb at minimum.

The number of meals per day, i.e., meal frequency, probably doesn’t matter as long as you are satiated and reaching your goals. Focus on whole, minimally processed foods, e.g., fresh fruits and veggies, whole grains, dairy (if you can tolerate it), eggs and minimally processed meats. You don’t have to eat just chicken and broccoli. You can have beef, seafood, turkey and pork, along with rice, sweet potatoes, and whatever other fruits or veggies may suit your palate.

From the last link I posted:

“Here’s the simple game plan:
Animal proteins for essential amino acids and essential fatty acids.
Plants for fiber and micro’s.
Whole food fats as the primary energy nutrient for sedentary, insulin resistant, obese populations.
A select few carbs (root vegetables and rice) as the primary energy nutrient for anaerobic exercisers.
And of course, “High quality H20” from the great water boy, Bobby Boucher.”

I think oats are fine for breakfast. You’ll get different opinions on here regarding consumption of grain-based carbs for weight loss. A lot of people find that they can eat grain-based carbs, as they can any other carb or macro, and still lose fat as long as you are in an overall calorie deficit and getting 80-90% of your calories from whole, minimally processed food sources, and I tend to agree with that based on personal experience.


#14

I have a different perspective to the other dude giving you advice here.

Personally, I think you might as well spend like 6 weeks just demolishing the fat, instead of a long, slow cut.

Check out The Rapid Fat Loss Handbook by Lyle MacDonald and see what you think.


#15

[quote]Yogi wrote:
I have a different perspective to the other dude giving you advice here.

Personally, I think you might as well spend like 6 weeks just demolishing the fat, instead of a long, slow cut.

Check out The Rapid Fat Loss Handbook by Lyle MacDonald and see what you think.[/quote]

I don’t necessarily think RFL is a bad plan, but since he seemed concerned about minimal LBM loss, it’s just been my observation that the slower, steady cuts seem to ameliorate this being more of a concern than it might otherwise be with the rapid cut programs.


#16

Jesus, JR you sound like a genius (no sarcasm) I’m lost in some of the stuff you are saying but thank you so much with the advice and what not I will follow and research some other stuff than get back to you guys. Thank you both!


#17

[quote]JR249 wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
I have a different perspective to the other dude giving you advice here.

Personally, I think you might as well spend like 6 weeks just demolishing the fat, instead of a long, slow cut.

Check out The Rapid Fat Loss Handbook by Lyle MacDonald and see what you think.[/quote]

I don’t necessarily think RFL is a bad plan, but since he seemed concerned about minimal LBM loss, it’s just been my observation that the slower, steady cuts seem to ameliorate this being more of a concern than it might otherwise be with the rapid cut programs.[/quote]

In my experience muscle loss on any cut is negligible, and it’s usually just the case that people are way fatter than they thought they were. I know I was! Haha


#18

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:
Jesus, JR you sound like a genius (no sarcasm) I’m lost in some of the stuff you are saying but thank you so much with the advice and what not I will follow and research some other stuff than get back to you guys. Thank you both![/quote]

I don’t claim to be an expert. :slight_smile:

Honestly, what I posted is just a general summation of what tends to work for a lot of people who use the slow cut approach when they want to minimize LBM loss. You’ll get a variety of opinions on low carb versus high carb, counting calories, etc. There is more than one way to skin a cat, but if it were me, based on what you said your goals were, I’d personally opt for the slow cut approach unless you have some sort of an impetus for an accelerated fat loss regiment (those do exist and they certainly can and do work too).


#19

[quote]JR249 wrote:

[quote]Swoleheim wrote:
Jesus, JR you sound like a genius (no sarcasm) I’m lost in some of the stuff you are saying but thank you so much with the advice and what not I will follow and research some other stuff than get back to you guys. Thank you both![/quote]

I don’t claim to be an expert. :slight_smile:

Honestly, what I posted is just a general summation of what tends to work for a lot of people who use the slow cut approach when they want to minimize LBM loss. You’ll get a variety of opinions on low carb versus high carb, counting calories, etc. There is more than one way to skin a cat, but if it were me, based on what you said your goals were, I’d personally opt for the slow cut approach unless you have some sort of an impetus for an accelerated fat loss regiment (those do exist and they certainly can and do work too).
[/quote]

Thank you, Check out my “Rate My Physique” photos, Need advice on that.