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Tibialis Anterior To Knee Pain

My info:
I’ve been bulking this summer and gained 18 pounds so far. My routine doesnt include any cardio. Im 20 years old and have never experienced knee pain before.

My problem:
I started playing tennis with my dad twice a week. When i run, my tibialis anterior feels heavy and give my strange muscular pain. It feels like mucle pounding on my bones.

My solution:
I started using the tibialis machine everytime i train calf. I use the same intensity and reps as my calf routine.

Results:
After 1.5 weeks with the new exercise
the pain from my tibialis is gone but
i now experience knee pain. I would describe my knees as shaky. They dont hurt went i walk but when i jump or run there is some pain and they feel weak.

Advices?
tanks

I would chalk it up to gaining almost 20 pounds in a fairly short period of time. That can definitely be a stressor to the joints of the lower body, especially if it’s combined with an activity like tennis.

From what you said, it sounds like you’ve got everything in place to rule out muscle imbalances, though, the fact that the pain “moved” up to your knee once you strengthened your tibs may mean there is. Be sure to include some direct hamstring work as well, so your entire knee, front and back, is strengthened.

Another possibility could be shin splints, from all the running, but I don’t believe that would bother the knee.

That’s about the best I can come up with. Why not have a professional take a look at it? They would be better able to review things.

Do you stretch your calves really good after all that calf work? - Do you strengthen the Tibias muscle - the one on the front?

If not - do it and see if this helps.

GL

If most of the 20 Lbs you have put on is in your upper body, your legs are for sure going to take a beating.

it sounds like you have taken care of the imbalance you had with your calves which is good. For your knees, make sure you are including a little bit of VM/VL (muscles on either side of the anterior knee joint)work with your hamstring training, as well as some adduction and abduction work with your legs. This will help with lateral stabalization which is big in the game of tennis, also can help with leg hypertrophy as well.

tanks for the responses.

I do heavy front and back squats.
The pain is symetrical, could it be
that the tibialis anterior machine
puts too much stress on the knee?
I was tinking about lowering the
intensity
of my workout and gradualy
bring it up to let my tibialis adapt.
What i find strange is that i would
expect the muscle to ake not the joints.

[quote]110% wrote:
tanks for the responses.

I do heavy front and back squats.
The pain is symetrical, could it be
that the tibialis anterior machine
puts too much stress on the knee?
I was tinking about lowering the
intensity
of my workout and gradualy
bring it up to let my tibialis adapt.
What i find strange is that i would
expect the muscle to ake not the joints.[/quote]

I wouldn’t say the machine puts too much stress on the knee; I’m going to assume this is a simple machine that allows dorsiflexion…not “stressful” to the knee. My thought is just some tendonitis; the increased work on the anterior tib. and the tennis may have flared you up a little. When running, the anterior tib helps decelerate the foot as you go into plantarflexion. The change of direction is also a factor. The origin of the tib.ant. is the lateral condyle and the superior half of the lateral surface of the tibia. So obviously the pain (if it’s in the distal knee joint) could be from the ant.tib. tendon. Hopefully my long-ass answer has done some good.

what are you’re recommendations?
stop using the machine?
use a different tibia.ant exercise?
add cardio to my routine?

tanks

with tendonitis - lower weight and longer negatives is a good thing to try.

Works on achilies tendonitis and Quad tendonitis.

Add a good stretching routine. Building muscle is great, but if you don’t remain or become flexable, those little pains become debilitating problems.

Work them less often, lower the weight, and stretch the hell out of the plantar and dorsiflexors. Adding cardio is going to do a whole lot.

Also, I forgot this and its the most important; ICE the shit out of them after any activity. and the others had good advice also. Be sure to keep us updated and good luck dealing with the little pain in the ass side effects of training

[quote]mindeffer01 wrote:
Add a good stretching routine. Building muscle is great, but if you don’t remain or become flexable, those little pains become debilitating problems.

[/quote]

Amen.