T Nation

Throwing up


#1

I think I got food poisioning or something because I threw up all last night, had bad cramps, the runs, etc. My question is should I try to eat more today to make up for the food I threw up during the night or just go about my usual eating? Also should I stick to liquids and soft food? Thanks in advance.


#2

Dont eat until you feel better.


#3

Make sure you stay well hydrated! What was the time frame between eating and then vomitting?


#4

When this happens to me I stay away from the food. I do however try to replace electrolytes that are lost after vomiting is finished.

Twin Lab Ultra Fuel is a good source. Gatorade not bad either.

Take it easy and I hope you feel better soon!

Zeb


#5

It was about 9 hours between eating and the first throw up.


#6

I always vomit into a bucket and then eat it back up when I feel better. That way you know you didn't "lose" any vital nutrients or calories.

:wink:


#7

Gatorade is a good move but cut it or dilute it with water.

You'll want like a 1 part gatorade to 2 or 3 parts water. It might taste bad, but you'll be able to adsorb more of the electrolytes rather than overload your kidneys all at once.

Hope you feel better, you should perhaps entertain the idea of going to see a doctor if it persists though. You might need a shot of phenegran to assist with the cramps and extreme nausea.

Take care,

B.


#8

replenish your body of water and electrolytes with a sports drink - this will prevent deydration and enable your body to recover quickly from a bout of nutrient deficiency. if you've got food poisoning, take it easy from eating and the gym. eating may contribute to increased feelings of nausea, and going to the gym may affect your immune system so that you are more prone to the effects of bad food. if you think you're alright and it was just one bad episode at the table, don't overload at your next meals to make up the caloric/nutrient deficit you lost when you hurled. it may just aggravate your stomach a little more and cause cramping.


#9

9 hours is probably staph. Symptoms should not last longer than 24 hours but if they do you probably want to go to a doctor.

What foods have you eaten in the last 24 hours? Any possible undercooked meat or seafood?


#10

You're probably over the worst part but in the future Pedialyte (sp?) works best. You can find it in the baby food isle. Much better on your system.
May want to pick up some depends too for those "late night surprises" :slight_smile:
(I was serious about the Pedialyte)


#11

arent electrolytes basically just salt?


#12

Yes but not just table salt (sodium chloride) there is also potassium, magnesium, etc...


#13

P-Dog,

Electrolytes are anything that, dissolved in water, will conduct an electric current.

There are strong and weak electrolytes, but that's not really important to this current discussion.

Strong electrolytes are typically salts, yep--at least in the sense that we think of them. The two most important electrolytes in the human body are sodium and potassium, which help control, among other things, blood pressure. They have a big role in controlling the flow of fluids in the body, especially within the cells. When you mess 'em up, you can have problems like cramps and such--which is why ketogenic diets frequently say that you should supplement your potassium intake--you tend to pee the stuff out if you're not careful. (Low carb foods tend to be lower in potassium, and ketogenic diets mess with your water balance, especially at the beginning. This has to do with glycogen being stored in water, and yadda yadda yadda.) Electrolytes become a big issue when you're losing a lot of water through your sweat (running a marathon) through your urine (ketosis, as mentioned before, or if you're drinking too much water) or feces/vomit (sickness). Otherwise, it's not that big of a deal to worry about.

Anyway, this is why Gatorade and Powerade and such advertise their Electrolytes. They make 'em sound like they're magical pixie dust, but they're just sodium (salt) and potassium, typically.

'Course, this is all from memory, so some of it could be wrong.

Dan "Yes, I was a Philosophy Major" McVicker


#14

Electrolytes are minerals such as Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Chloride, Bicarbonate, Phosphate, Sulphate ions.

Normally isotonic sports drink i.e. Gatorade and the like will contain 6% carb as well (normally glucose) to give the same osmolality as the blood of 280-330mOsm/kg.

I make my own by adding a glucose based squash drink to water with some Salt 0.5g/L (Sodium Chlodide) and some Lo-salt 0.5g/L(60/40 Mix of Potassium Chloride and Sodium Chloride). (Potassium and Sodium are the principal cations used to regulate fluid balance inside and outside cells in the body).


#15

Yes salt(sodium) is an electrolyte but so is potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate and sulfate.

Pedilyte(sp?) is suppose to have a better electrolyte profile than gatorade or powerade I belive. A company called Champion Lyte introduced a sugar free version last year that is similiar to gatorade.


#16

Listen to your body, if you don't feel like eating it's probably because you shouldn't!! When the stomach is ready for some food you will know.

Eating at the foodstalls here in Thailand have given me stomach problems quite often, this is what I do.

I usually starts with yoghurt, tasty and easy on the stomach. Drink alot though, small amounts and often. Stay away from cold drinks, the closer to body temp the better.