T Nation

Thoughts on Program?

Hey all,

Not sure if this is the right place. It’s not really a power lifting program, but it isn’t quite an Oly program either. I’m incorporating a bit of both, knowing that I won’t be as good as a power lifting at power lifting, or an Oly lifter at Oly lifting.

The goal is just athleticism, power, and a decent physique.

It’s based off of something I read Pendlay say where he mentions his favourite split is a Squat/Push and Pull split.

So…

Squat/Push

  • Broad Jump 5x3
  • Box Squat 5x3
  • Military Press 5x5
  • Bench Press 3-4x8-10

Pull

  • Snatch 8-10x1-2
  • Power Clean 5x3-5
  • Snatch Grip Deadlift 5x5
  • Pendlay Row 4-5x5-8

Squat/Push

  • Box Jump 5x3
  • Front Squat 5x3
  • Push Press 5x5
  • Close Grip Bench Press 3-4x8-10

Pull

  • Clean 8-10x1-3
  • Power Snatch 5-8x2-3
  • Trap Bar Deadlift 5x3-5
  • Pull Ups 3-5x5-8

Generally, try to keep snatch variations before clean variations (excluding heavy pulls). Cleans seem to interfere with snatches more than snatches interfere with cleans.

Why trap bar deadlift? To save the low back? And are the pull ups weighted or nah?

[quote]nkklllll wrote:
Generally, try to keep snatch variations before clean variations (excluding heavy pulls). Cleans seem to interfere with snatches more than snatches interfere with cleans.

Why trap bar deadlift? To save the low back? And are the pull ups weighted or nah?[/quote]

Noted on snatch variation before cleans. Will try switching those around.

Pull ups will vary. If I’m feeling good I’d add weight and aim for sets of 5. Otherwise, bodyweight and just go for sets of 8.

Trap bar deadlift is due to saving lower back. I am prone to lower back/spasms if I abuse it too much. Trap bar deads have felt fine though.

I’m doing snatch deads as I find that’s a little less lower back and the grip and upper back emphasis keeps the weight down a bit.

Have you seen pendlay’s super total article/programme?

Will second Pendlay’s article on the super total

[quote]Charlietr wrote:
Have you seen pendlay’s super total article/programme?[/quote]

I haven’t. I’ll try to find it.

[quote]nkklllll wrote:
Will second Pendlay’s article on the super total[/quote]

The article I was able to find regarding Pendlay’s program only lists two exercises per session, and has nothing regarding sets and reps.

Is there really only two exercises per session? Or, do those two exercises just form the foundation and supplementary work is up to me?

Any set/rep schemes set for his program?

The two lifts are your competition lifts. Figure out what you would need for assistance and add it in at the end.

If you don’t know how to program the main lifts you could do one of two things: 1. more research on the set/rep schemes that have proven to be the most effective for training the different lifts, or 2. stick to a tried and true program which will be guaranteed to make you better at either powerlifting or Olympic lifting (but not both). There’s not a lot of room for error in this schedule (Pendlay’s supertotal program is more of a schedule, not really a program since there is no set/reps/%s) and you could end up spinning your wheels and being chronically underrecovered if you don’t plan it out correctly.

The two lifts are your competition lifts. Figure out what you would need for assistance and add it in at the end.

If you don’t know how to program the main lifts you could do one of two things: 1. more research on the set/rep schemes that have proven to be the most effective for training the different lifts, or 2. stick to a tried and true program which will be guaranteed to make you better at either powerlifting or Olympic lifting (but not both). There’s not a lot of room for error in this schedule (Pendlay’s supertotal program is more of a schedule, not really a program since there is no set/reps/%s) and you could end up spinning your wheels and being chronically underrecovered if you don’t plan it out correctly.

Pendlay does give an indication of what days should be heavy and light so that could translate to max and 80% or something similar, relative to reps? Pendlay also has some articles on programming which should help. If you are training at a high intensity the simplicity is necessary ie there is no need to do lots of exercises if the quality and selection is good. Add in assistance if/as necessary but you’re better off keeping it simple the vast majority of the time. A lot of olympic lifters just do lifts, pulls and squats most sessions, likewise a lot of powerlifters just do one our two main lifts most sessions (up to and including elite); both will do variations/special assistance based upon the main lifts and maybe some other work on military press, good mornings etc. 531 and cube method are popular/effective templates for programming guidance but it depends on your experience too.

Oly lifts and variations to start each day, swapping between power, hang and full versions. Bench press once or twice a week (swap push press in here if needed) plus one day with strict press after OL. Depending on your strengths fill up the rest of the session with squat variations and pulls. Add in some accessory movements for mass. This is pretty much what I do and it works well for an all-round approach depending on your recovery ability and commitments.