T Nation

Think 35 Is Old

[quote]Ragnarthehammer wrote:
I am 65 and work out (currently) three days a week, doing abdominal work in the morning for about 20 minutes, and low rep (5 - 12) movements in the afternoon/evening. When you guys hit sixty, unless you’re on some kind of juice, there will be a very noticeable decline in (for lack of a better term) your strength levels. The damned weights will start feeling heavier, as will all your equipment, if you have to set up in your garage like I do. I have been an Olympic lifter (with a few power meets thrown in for good measure) for 47 years (never made the Olympics or even got close to them) and the data that we have on Masters (guys and gals over 35) show pretty clearly that at age 80, If God lets you live that long, you will be able to lift about half what you could at age 40 (the data have been analyzed and published by Dave Meltzer, who, when he’s not being a Master Olympic weightlifter, is a professor of mathematics).

 I don't train for muscular hypertrophy but rather to keep my skills in the two Olympic lifts.  I also squat, and at about 175 (not quite 80 k) I can still crank out reps with 355 - may be five or six.  But there was a time not too long ago when I could get two sets of fifteen reps each with 385 at that bodyweight.  I don't use and never have used 'roids and I'm not about to start now.  I may try this product called Spike, if the powers that be at T-Nation assure me that there's nothing illegal in it - someone there said that they want to try it on some prominent athletes, or words to that effect.

At any rate, you young pups who are in your thities or forties or fifties - hang in there, keep up with the stuff on the T-Nation site, and try some Olympic lifting once in a while.  Like we say, nothing feels better than a good snatch.[/quote]

I’m not feeling quite as old as I was prior to reading this.

[quote]duke wrote:

Am I past the building stage at 40?
[/quote]

Absolutely not.

I agree with some of the other posts. You may need to rest more, eat more/better, and adjust for aging metabolism, joints, etc…

But past building strength and muscle?

Not me, and I’m 44.

[quote]Ragnarthehammer wrote:
I am 65 and work out (currently) three days a week, doing abdominal work in the morning for about 20 minutes, and low rep (5 - 12) movements in the afternoon/evening. When you guys hit sixty, unless you’re on some kind of juice, there will be a very noticeable decline in (for lack of a better term) your strength levels. The damned weights will start feeling heavier, as will all your equipment, if you have to set up in your garage like I do. I have been an Olympic lifter (with a few power meets thrown in for good measure) for 47 years (never made the Olympics or even got close to them) and the data that we have on Masters (guys and gals over 35) show pretty clearly that at age 80, If God lets you live that long, you will be able to lift about half what you could at age 40 (the data have been analyzed and published by Dave Meltzer, who, when he’s not being a Master Olympic weightlifter, is a professor of mathematics).

 I don't train for muscular hypertrophy but rather to keep my skills in the two Olympic lifts.  I also squat, and at about 175 (not quite 80 k) I can still crank out reps with 355 - may be five or six.  But there was a time not too long ago when I could get two sets of fifteen reps each with 385 at that bodyweight.  I don't use and never have used 'roids and I'm not about to start now.  I may try this product called Spike, if the powers that be at T-Nation assure me that there's nothing illegal in it - someone there said that they want to try it on some prominent athletes, or words to that effect. [/quote]

Except that I’m only 49, will never do a power lifting meet, and have never squated more than 160 kgs, sounds a lot like me. Been olympic lifting since I was 16, and got close but never did quite qualify for nationals. My current lifts are close to my all time best. What are your current lifts?

Yeah, a good snatch feels good but anyone who can say that has never thrown hammer.
I started that and weight throw two years ago. Someday I hope to give Dan John a run for his money.

And Professor, you feeling alright?

[quote]Senseial wrote:
Glad to see something for us “mature” lifters.
At 54 I train 5 days per week, lifting 3 times and cardio twice. This keeps the powerlifting up, the body noticeable by nookie girls, and hoochie mamas alike, and my bp and cholesterol down.
Today a few of us were talking about our first powerlifting meets. When I told them mine was in 1968 one lifter told me that was the year he was born, another just said “damn”, and the third said he wasn’t born yet then. Death to him.
At our age main things are to keep at it, eat right, rest, and balance our lives.
So all of you keep at it, and let’s compare notes. I always learn something new.[/quote]
I’m in my 50’s and training also…As us old Soldiers say:“Drive On”!!

[quote]duke wrote:
Thanks for the encouragement.
As for eating right, I find it hard enough steer clear of Macca’s & other fast foods. Simply avoiding crap is about all I can hope for. I use the protien shakes etc but you guys know what it’s like - 40 yrs old, working more than 60 hours per week, kids, Mrs, etc.
I tried a personal trainer but I was so busy I had to keep cancelling appointments because of work.
I’ll retire one day soon, perhaps then I can focus on eating & training right.[/quote]
I’ve got over 10 years on you and in a similar boat:Extremely demanding, stressful (& poorly paid) job description not optimal for bodybuilding results, but I still keep hammering it as best as possible, this year with even more determination…

[quote]duke wrote:
I’m 40 and although I train 3 or 4 times per week, I feel the progress just isn’t there. I spend most of my time wishing I’d started when I was 20. All the training keeps me tight and toned but at 80kg (or 176lb for you guys) I don’t seem to be able to build up too much at all.
Am I past the building stage at 40?

I’m just learning all this stuff I guess, I don’t really understand all the tech stuff written on this site, but I love the site, purely for it’s motivational effect on me.[/quote]

Hey, duke, you’ve got it backwards! I’m 43 and didn’t start lifting seriously until I was 39. I’m making great progress and I’m very happy that I didn’t start earlier for one simple reason – most guys our age have mulitple old injuries that they have to deal with (and that hold them back). I’ve never had any serious injury. I find this allows me to really push the envelope when I want to and can make real gains. It feels great to make new PR’s on my lifts regularly. I’m also bigger and more bulky than I’ve ever been in my life.

If you are having problems bulking past 40, I’d suggest that you first put focus on your diet. You need to eat clean and eat enough to allow your body to make gains. Workout hard and workout regularly.

cruncher

[quote]duke wrote:
I’m 40 and although I train 3 or 4 times per week, I feel the progress just isn’t there. I spend most of my time wishing I’d started when I was 20. All the training keeps me tight and toned but at 80kg (or 176lb for you guys) I don’t seem to be able to build up too much at all.
Am I past the building stage at 40?

I’m just learning all this stuff I guess, I don’t really understand all the tech stuff written on this site, but I love the site, purely for it’s motivational effect on me.[/quote]

Hell no you’re not too old to gain muscle mass!

I’m 47 and made some great gains this past year, probably 8 lbs of lean muscle. I work a 12 hour night shift Wed. through Sat. 48 hour week in 4 nights.

Sleep, is always messed up on workdays!! Even with the lack of sleep on workdays, I manage to get in 4 lifts a week with 3 to 4 cardio sessions. Eating right is a chore with the turn arounds from days to nights and even with all that going against me, I managed to do OK this past year, and looking forward to an even better year in 07.

Oh, been at this weight lifting thing since I was 15 years old. So I have a little experience under my belt!!

BTW, T-Nation is the best thing that I’ve run across in all my years of lifting!!! Thanks to all of you!!

Still growing a bit at 61 and 50 years of lifting. You just have to be open-minded to new ideas and be willing to experiment and mix it up. Keep it simple, keep workouts short but intense and work with both compounds and some isolations. Eat right. Get enough sleep. Make sure your test levels are up to snuff. Limit stress as much as possible. Then you have to improve.

[quote]starsil9 wrote:
duke wrote:
I’m 40 and although I train 3 or 4 times per week, I feel the progress just isn’t there. I spend most of my time wishing I’d started when I was 20. All the training keeps me tight and toned but at 80kg (or 176lb for you guys) I don’t seem to be able to build up too much at all.
Am I past the building stage at 40?

I’m just learning all this stuff I guess, I don’t really understand all the tech stuff written on this site, but I love the site, purely for it’s motivational effect on me.

Hell no you’re not too old to gain muscle mass!

I’m 47 and made some great gains this past year, probably 8 lbs of lean muscle. I work a 12 hour night shift Wed. through Sat. 48 hour week in 4 nights.

Sleep, is always messed up on workdays!! Even with the lack of sleep on workdays, I manage to get in 4 lifts a week with 3 to 4 cardio sessions. Eating right is a chore with the turn arounds from days to nights and even with all that going against me, I managed to do OK this past year, and looking forward to an even better year in 07.

Oh, been at this weight lifting thing since I was 15 years old. So I have a little experience under my belt!!

BTW, T-Nation is the best thing that I’ve run across in all my years of lifting!!! Thanks to all of you!!

[/quote]

I work almost identical hours 12 hour nights, 3-4 days in a row depending on the week.
When do you find it best to work out during the working part of your week?

40 and 12 hour shifts 7 days a week, time is ever so precious. My work is not grueling, but the hours can be.

I’m soon-to-be 50, and have been training in martial arts for about five years. I do some strength training to supplement my grappling, etc. I’ve been thinking about this kind of topic for a while - what can I expect in my 50’s as a MA student?

Will I be able to continue to improve, or will I be just hanging on to whatever skills I have left? How does your body respond to these demands as it ages?

I train with a lot of younger guys now, and my intstructors all younger, so they don’t necessarily know where I’m coming from, but you have to treat every day in the dojo or the gym as a gift.