T Nation

THIB'S TIP: Explosive Pull Continuous Ramp


#1

In a previous post I talked about the 3 main types of explosive pulls I use. Here's is a max ramp method that I really like, I feel that it makes the most out of every pulling style.

1) I start out doing snatch-grip high pulls from blocks; I start out at 60kg and work my way up to a 1RM for the day (lets say 150kg for the sake of the explanation)

2) I start out where I finished the first portion of the ramp (150kg) and switch to chinese pulls and continue ramping (let's say to 180kg)

3) From there I switch again to snatch-grip low pulls ramping from the end of the chinese pull up to a max (let's say 200kg)

4) I do one last switch, to clean-grip low pulls ramping from where the preceding step ended (200kg) up to a max (let's say 220kg)

Because of the high volume of heavy work I do not do clusters. Instead I pick one of the 4 pulling styles, take 80% of the max ramp for that movement (for example if I pick chinese pulls I will use 80% of 180kg, about 145kg) then do 1 rep from blocks and 2-3 reps from hang. I do 3 such sets.

BTW, on chinese pull you are not simply bending down to meet the bar;

You aggressively and rapidly bend the knees while getting the heel back on the platform as fast as possible.

You also actively use your traps not to pull the bar high, but rather to pull yourself down. That is very important for maximum results.


#2

How do you usually warmup, I’ve not noticed you talk about it. And, what assistant work would you do with this pullday?


#3

[quote]NikH wrote:
How do you usually warmup, I’ve not noticed you talk about it. And, what assistant work would you do with this pullday?[/quote]

This morning I did very light snatch-grip deads to warm-up then started the pulls very light. I do not do a real warm-up (I should) but I do mobility work later during the day.

The assistance exercise I like the most is the overhead support from pins but I sometimes do snatch-grip deadlifts.


#4

@CT:

I would love to see a WO like this on video. Is something like that possible while you are at Biotest HQ?
Just the highlights of each ramp. It would be very helpful to see your pulling style.

I do a very similar WO from blocks, but I had not yet added the 4th style of the clean grip low pull.

Thanks!
M


#5

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
@CT:

I would love to see a WO like this on video. Is something like that possible while you are at Biotest HQ?
Just the highlights of each ramp. It would be very helpful to see your pulling style.

I do a very similar WO from blocks, but I had not yet added the 4th style of the clean grip low pull.

Thanks!
M[/quote]

We have 2 photo sessions set up (tomorrow and wednesday) but I do not think that we will have video.


#6

@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?


#7

[quote]jormanders74 wrote:
@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?[/quote]

If you start the continuous ramp from blocks you do all pulls from blocks. There is some added benefit to doing the pulls from the floor, but don’t do it if you are not able to use as much weight as from blocks.


#8

I tried this yesterday, but not quite sure if I did it correctly. I essentially started with the SGHP for 6 sets, then did the SG Chinese Pull for 3 sets, the SGLP for 3 sets and finally the CGLP for 2 sets. I loved the first three pull types since I had actually kind of been doing SGHP and SG Chinese Pulls in my normal layer workouts, but felt really off when switching to a clean grip. Any cues for the clean grip that are different than the snatch grip?

Also, I worked up to 255 for 2 on my final set, so used 205 for 3 sets of 3 on my SGHP. The heaviest I had ever done previously was 185 to ensure I remained explosive, so needless to say I didn’t feel as if my form was great when doing these. Should I have used a lesser percentage than 80% or have I been going too light in the past on SGHP? Just curious what your thoughts are, I know that it is hard to tell without video. Thanks CT!


#9

[quote]GeneticSynergy9 wrote:
I tried this yesterday, but not quite sure if I did it correctly. I essentially started with the SGHP for 6 sets, then did the SG Chinese Pull for 3 sets, the SGLP for 3 sets and finally the CGLP for 2 sets. I loved the first three pull types since I had actually kind of been doing SGHP and SG Chinese Pulls in my normal layer workouts, but felt really off when switching to a clean grip. Any cues for the clean grip that are different than the snatch grip?

Also, I worked up to 255 for 2 on my final set, so used 205 for 3 sets of 3 on my SGHP. The heaviest I had ever done previously was 185 to ensure I remained explosive, so needless to say I didn’t feel as if my form was great when doing these. Should I have used a lesser percentage than 80% or have I been going too light in the past on SGHP? Just curious what your thoughts are, I know that it is hard to tell without video. Thanks CT![/quote]

It’s normal to feel weird with the clean pull at first, especially when you have been doing a lot of snatch-grip pulls. First because the arms/shoulders are not in the same position when you explode and second because the explosion point is not at the same place due to the closer grip (the point of explosion/launch will be a bit lower) which can be awkward at first because the bar will be a bit more forward relative to your center of mass because of the narrower grip (well, because it is lower on the legs, which is due to the narrower grip).

After a few sessions you will get it. At first when you are up to the clean pull you can work your way down a bit then ramp back up.

If you feel off or have doubt about your explosiveness, use less weight.


#10

Is it true that when 80% of 1RM is used for the 1 rep from blocks then 3-4 from hang, 3 sets, 30 secs between sets, that the 80% is based on the movement from the ramp that is being done?

I.E. if SGHP is chosen, then it’s 80% of the max from that portion of the ramp, not the last weight used in say clean grip low pull.

Thanks!
M


#11

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
Is it true that when 80% of 1RM is used for the 1 rep from blocks then 3-4 from hang, 3 sets, 30 secs between sets, that the 80% is based on the movement from the ramp that is being done?

I.E. if SGHP is chosen, then it’s 80% of the max from that portion of the ramp, not the last weight used in say clean grip low pull.

Thanks!
M[/quote]

Correct


#12

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jormanders74 wrote:
@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?[/quote]

If you start the continuous ramp from blocks you do all pulls from blocks. There is some added benefit to doing the pulls from the floor, but don’t do it if you are not able to use as much weight as from blocks.[/quote]

@CT…At first, I could do quite a bit more from the floor than from blocks. Now, with practice, both starting points yield the same weight. In fact, if I keep at it, I believe from the blocks will lead me to some pretty decent weight for me.

I am fairly proficient in my bar path from the floor, but blocks are really improving rapidly.

Should I do both?


#13

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jormanders74 wrote:
@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?[/quote]

If you start the continuous ramp from blocks you do all pulls from blocks. There is some added benefit to doing the pulls from the floor, but don’t do it if you are not able to use as much weight as from blocks.[/quote]

@CT…At first, I could do quite a bit more from the floor than from blocks. Now, with practice, both starting points yield the same weight. In fact, if I keep at it, I believe from the blocks will lead me to some pretty decent weight for me.

I am fairly proficient in my bar path from the floor, but blocks are really improving rapidly.

Should I do both?[/quote]

I sometimes do both… I will start the workout from the floor then switch to blocks… but you cannot do both all-out in a workout. You could do one workout from the floor, but the problem is that lifting from the floor increases neural stress a lot.


#14

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jormanders74 wrote:
@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?[/quote]

If you start the continuous ramp from blocks you do all pulls from blocks. There is some added benefit to doing the pulls from the floor, but don’t do it if you are not able to use as much weight as from blocks.[/quote]

@CT…At first, I could do quite a bit more from the floor than from blocks. Now, with practice, both starting points yield the same weight. In fact, if I keep at it, I believe from the blocks will lead me to some pretty decent weight for me.

I am fairly proficient in my bar path from the floor, but blocks are really improving rapidly.

Should I do both?[/quote]

I sometimes do both… I will start the workout from the floor then switch to blocks… but you cannot do both all-out in a workout. You could do one workout from the floor, but the problem is that lifting from the floor increases neural stress a lot.[/quote]

Very true - I’ve noticed that I’m quite drained from a full, all-out WO starting from the floor. Whereas from blocks, I can move much faster between sets and it almost ramps me up even more. Maybe 1 out of 4 WO’s from floor for me?

Long limbs, short torso also make me less efficient from the floor. It has taken me a lot of practice.

Blocks efficiency is coming quickly - like only 3 weeks and I reached my from the floor weights.


#15

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jormanders74 wrote:
@CT. You wrote that the snatch grip high pulls should be from blocks. Are the rest of the pulls from blocks as well? Also if one is technically efficient at pulling from the floor, is there any added benefit to doing high pulls from the floor?[/quote]

If you start the continuous ramp from blocks you do all pulls from blocks. There is some added benefit to doing the pulls from the floor, but don’t do it if you are not able to use as much weight as from blocks.[/quote]

@CT…At first, I could do quite a bit more from the floor than from blocks. Now, with practice, both starting points yield the same weight. In fact, if I keep at it, I believe from the blocks will lead me to some pretty decent weight for me.

I am fairly proficient in my bar path from the floor, but blocks are really improving rapidly.

Should I do both?[/quote]

I sometimes do both… I will start the workout from the floor then switch to blocks… but you cannot do both all-out in a workout. You could do one workout from the floor, but the problem is that lifting from the floor increases neural stress a lot.[/quote]

Very true - I’ve noticed that I’m quite drained from a full, all-out WO starting from the floor. Whereas from blocks, I can move much faster between sets and it almost ramps me up even more. Maybe 1 out of 4 WO’s from floor for me?

Long limbs, short torso also make me less efficient from the floor. It has taken me a lot of practice.

Blocks efficiency is coming quickly - like only 3 weeks and I reached my from the floor weights.[/quote]

Actually long arms are better off the floor… short arms and legs is much weaker off the floor.

Someone who is able to produce a lot of power quickly normally is 4-7% stronger from blocks than from floor.


#16

Ah, interesting fact.

So maybe my recent adaptation is me becoming better at producing power quickly.

I also think the drained feeling from the floor is that I used to focus too much on the arms.

When you gave me the tip of relaxing arms with torso tight and explode thru hips, it helped me be much more efficient.

In fact, last week from the blocks I just surpassed my best pull from the floor; it was only 2lbs, but it felt more explosive.

Today will be my first WO with the 4 pulls, SGHP, SGCP, SGLP, CGLP then 3 sets SGHP, 1 from blocks then 3-4 from hang. Looking forward to it!


#17

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
Ah, interesting fact.

So maybe my recent adaptation is me becoming better at producing power quickly.

I also think the drained feeling from the floor is that I used to focus too much on the arms.

When you gave me the tip of relaxing arms with torso tight and explode thru hips, it helped me be much more efficient.

In fact, last week from the blocks I just surpassed my best pull from the floor; it was only 2lbs, but it felt more explosive.

Today will be my first WO with the 4 pulls, SGHP, SGCP, SGLP, CGLP then 3 sets SGHP, 1 from blocks then 3-4 from hang. Looking forward to it![/quote]

Let me know how it goes


#18

The continuous ramp is a great feeling… even though the weight gets heavier and heavier you feel more and more explosive.

BTW, for the chinese pull do not just drop the chest down to the bar, you actually have to drop down with a fairly upright torso (bending the knees more that bending the torso) and use your traps to pull yourself down.


#19

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
The continuous ramp is a great feeling… even though the weight gets heavier and heavier you feel more and more explosive.

BTW, for the chinese pull do not just drop the chest down to the bar, you actually have to drop down with a fairly upright torso (bending the knees more that bending the torso) and use your traps to pull yourself down.[/quote]

I’m mildly annoyed that you introduced an idea this interesting during my deload week… I have to wait until Sunday night to try this. Question: i see the rationale behind the order of the exercises. Would you see any value to a variation in which you reverse the order?


#20

[quote]cubuff2028 wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
The continuous ramp is a great feeling… even though the weight gets heavier and heavier you feel more and more explosive.

BTW, for the chinese pull do not just drop the chest down to the bar, you actually have to drop down with a fairly upright torso (bending the knees more that bending the torso) and use your traps to pull yourself down.[/quote]

I’m mildly annoyed that you introduced an idea this interesting during my deload week… I have to wait until Sunday night to try this. Question: i see the rationale behind the order of the exercises. Would you see any value to a variation in which you reverse the order? [/quote]

Yes actually I would. Chinese olympic lifters normally do their heavier pulls first, then the faster (hgher ones) afterwards. They are obviously getting results.

I personally have tried it… the positive is that after doing the heavier stuff, the faster/higher ones feel and are much more explosive… the negative is that you can’t use as much weight on the heavier lifts because you are not yet neurally activated. For example, I reached 190kg on low pulls when starting with them but reach 220kg when doing them last, and they are more explosive.