T Nation

Thib's help

It was brought to my attention that I could come to the beginner forum to help you guys out. I’ll be browsing the threads from time to time but if you have any questions to ask me, feel free to post them in this thread and I’ll answer them as best as I can.

woah, CT & CC in the same sub-forum?

Newbies are about to make some GAINZ

any form cues to make dips a bit more shoulder friendly? Just can’t seem to do them without pain. I read an article where you say to flare the lats which I’ll try. Is there anything else I could try?

[quote]Yogi wrote:
any form cues to make dips a bit more shoulder friendly? Just can’t seem to do them without pain. I read an article where you say to flare the lats which I’ll try. Is there anything else I could try?[/quote]

Looked at this? http://www.T-Nation.com/strength-training-topics/dip

[quote]Claudan wrote:
woah, CT & CC in the same sub-forum?

Newbies are about to make some GAINZ[/quote]

I’ll do my best!

[quote]Yogi wrote:
any form cues to make dips a bit more shoulder friendly? Just can’t seem to do them without pain. I read an article where you say to flare the lats which I’ll try. Is there anything else I could try?[/quote]

I tell my beginner/intermediate clients to minimize shoulder rotation and forward displacement. Imagine that the upper body is a block and moves down at the same time and stay in the same position. With beginners who have less strength and shoulder integrity I use the following form:

  1. Use a narrower grip and keep your upper arm tucked to your sides as much as possible throughout the whole range of motion

  2. Focus on bending mostly at the elbow joint, try to bring your armpits toward your hands while keeping the chest up… do not bend forward at all… really imagine doing more of a triceps extension and pressdown.

  3. Avoid “bringing the chest down” to go lower… keep your shoulders in their socket do not let them drift forward even if that means less range of motion for now.

As you get stronger, more mobile and better at bracing the shoulders you will be able to go down lower while maintaining an upright torso.

This will work mostly the triceps.

If you want to work the chest more the torso will have to be inclined forward a bit more. BUT I still recommend MAINTAINING THE SAME TORSO ANGLE AS YOU GO DOWN. You just incline it a little, maybe 15 degrees from the start, and go down maintaining that same angle, avoiding the shoulders drifting forward.

In the video posted look at 1:25 how Stephane is keeping the torso angle the same throughout the movement… people who get shoulders issues from dips will have a lot of movement or changes in torso angle during the movement.

I literally do every single thing wrong when I dip! Haha, no wonder they make such a mess of my shoulders!

Thanks Thibs for the help, much appreciated, and thanks Claudan for posting that video.

Thib what do you think is the best progresion schema for beginers who wants gain some mass and also get stronger?
Do you also hav some workout template for someone who can train only 2 time’s per week and have rounded scholders?

[quote]Claudan wrote:
woah, CT & CC in the same sub-forum?

Newbies are about to make some GAINZ[/quote]
Pretty much.

omg… tango and cash!

edit: i hope neither of you has a sister : )

Hi CT

A couple of programming questions. You have been pretty clear in the past that selecting the main lifts for a programme is something people often don’t put enough thought into. Over the past year I have rather flip flopped between lower body lifts, and as a result haven’t made the progress I would have liked.

From some of your fairly recent posts in your log it looked to me that you felt the deadlift and front squat were perhaps a more complete combination than the “classic” deadlift back squat combo. For an athlete looking to improve performance in contact sports would you recommend the deadlift and the front squat as the two lifts to put at the centre of an extended training block?

My second question regards how frequently core lifts should be programmed for a beginner/intermediate. Is one training session per lift per week enough for someone with about a year’s experience of lifting to gain mastery of movements or should I look to programme each core lift twice within a week (lifting four times a week)? Hugely appreciate your time and help

CT : after all this years of experience what kind of program would you make a beginner do to get optimal results?
Everyone is doing Starting Strength or Stronglifts these days, so it would be nice to see what a coach who is jacked and strong and also believes in high frequency training says about that topic.

Hello CT!

I just want to ask something: I can’t squat ATG, and when I use heel elevation for parallel squatting, I feel a kind of stretch in my hamstrings.
I’ve “solved” this problem by doing squats like this: I squat on to a bench (box squats essentially), BUT I’ve found that “putting my ass back” is uncomfortable to me. Thus when I squat, I just look at myself (“into my eyes” in the mirror". I don’t feel any pain doing so, and I really feel my quadriceps. Is this an OK way to squat?

The two parts of this question I would like to get an answer to are:

  1. Is it okay to do box squats, gradually building up one’s squat depth as time goes by?
  2. Is it okay to do squats, not leaning back “with the ass” but instead squat while looking at yourself (“into my eyes”) in the mirror?

Thank you!

i have two concerns,

One: On my bench i find my hips rising… when i push the bar off my chest. is this okay?

Two: Is there a proper foot placement for front squats? I love a wide stance toes pointed out feels very natural to me.