T Nation

The Warrior Diet

I started this a few days back in an attempt to lose some body fat but was unsure of the strategy to follow regards the overfeed part. I mean can I really eat pizza and stuff on this diet? And every day if I so chose?

The diets creator says as much in an interview given here on T- Nation as does Tim Paterson somewhere also LOL. I mean I dont often eat pizza but are my low carb food choices during the overfeeding phase actually hampering my efforts to lose fat?

I am sort of combining the Warrior Diet with Low carb Keto style eating but if this is the wrong way to go then I will substantially up the carbs.

I remember when I first found out about the warrior diet, could you give a little insight to what the guidelines for it are?

BTW, yes, I would up the carbs a bit to play it safe.

I switched to the warrior plan a few months ago and am loving it… it fits my work schedule great since I work 80+ hours a week in the oilfield… I snack on 1-3 handfuls raw nuts and 1-3 fruits during the day, also take 1 serving greens plus and fish oil…

I work out at night ala Waterbury style for about an hour 3 times a week, including interval training… I sip 1 serving Surge and 1 scoop gatorade with creatine before, during, and after my workout, and then go home and eat healthy foods till I am satisfied…

Lately I’ve been into stews and sandwiches because they are easy to prepare… I dunno exact calories but I average probably 3000 or so on workout days and 2700 non workout…

once or twice a week as schedule permits I eat out with my girl, we’ll go to a greek place for instance and I’ll get a pita wrap with veg and meat, and another full platter with meat, veggies and bread… then before bed for a treat I may have a few Metabolic Drive bars I keep in the freezer- yum…

Anyways, I’m getting stronger and leaner and feel great… good energy during the day, can do a full chinup with 135 around my waist, 90 pounds for 9 reps, dips with 135 for 8 reps and less than 10% BF at 205 lbs, 6ft…
hope this helps
Pete

[quote]FreedomFighterXL wrote:
I remember when I first found out about the warrior diet, could you give a little insight to what the guidelines for it are?

BTW, yes, I would up the carbs a bit to play it safe. [/quote]

Hi FFXL, the WD goes basically like this:

  1. Eat minimal food throughout the day to encourage the body to burn fat for energy; people report a big boost in energy levels; food should be as natural as possible such as raw nuts, raw fruits or veggies or freshly juiced fruits and veggies, minimal protein throughout the day as you want digestion to be as minimal as possible.
  2. At night, you feast on literally about as much food as you can stuff down your gullet over a couple of hours (some people do it all at once but I’ve read of some people eating over the course of about 4 hrs; I usually took about an hour or so).

As published in the book, the daily meal should be uncooked veggies first, followed by cooked veggies, meats & fats next, followed with the carbs last, so as to minimize carb consumption naturally (you’re already stuffed). The point is to get nearly all of your daily calories in the last part of the day, a couple hours before bed time.

Stews and soups seem to be pretty common because that’s what the author mentions as his preference and when I did that, I came up with some great recipes (damn, I need to make some).

I was doing the WD about the time I start my martial arts classes, but the classes were so late at night that I was absolutely dying of hunger when I got home and the whole process of prepping and cooking the food was making me get to bed really late, which was killing me at work. Of course, about the time I stopped I got a crock pot as a gift, so I could always go back and mess with the WD again and be prepared ahead of time with food. :slight_smile:

So wait, someone explain to me why exactly this is such a great plan to loose fat? Won’t you eat the shit out of your muscles? How is this good for you to eat all that stuff at night with it sitting in your stomach all night long??? I might try this since I’m planning on doing a bodybuilding show next year sometime in the summer or so…

[quote]darkstyle wrote:
So wait, someone explain to me why exactly this is such a great plan to loose fat? Won’t you eat the shit out of your muscles? How is this good for you to eat all that stuff at night with it sitting in your stomach all night long??? I might try this since I’m planning on doing a bodybuilding show next year sometime in the summer or so…[/quote]

Hi darkstyle,

Some people will tell you that the WD “doesn’t work” but they rarely offer much information about their experiences, typically just personal opinions.

I have been told by multiple people who have done it that they have, indeed, gained muscle (or at least not lost anything measurable) and lost fat while doing the WD. I don’t have a lot of data either way, and I didn’t do it long enough to get a good personal baseline, as my work and training schedules made it too hard to follow for me. I didn’t want to be eating until 1am and then have to get up at 6 to get ready for work. :slight_smile:

More information can be found at www.warriordiet.com. There’s a book and an ebook guide, as well, but I haven’t picked that up. The description I gave before is not the entire concept, just a rough outline.

If I do decide to do it again, I’m sure that I’ll still use Biotest supps during it.

[quote]RhunDraco wrote:
If I do decide to do it again, I’m sure that I’ll still use Biotest supps during it.[/quote]

Just for you.

Does the book explain the scientific basis at all for the diet? Or is it mostly a “This worked for Joe Nobody, Jane Doe, etc. It can work for you” type of thing? Cause I believe it could work, I’d just like to know why.

[quote]Brant_Drake wrote:
RhunDraco wrote:
If I do decide to do it again, I’m sure that I’ll still use Biotest supps during it.

Just for you.


[/quote]

Already seen that, but thanks! :slight_smile:

[quote]Epimetheus wrote:
Does the book explain the scientific basis at all for the diet? Or is it mostly a “This worked for Joe Nobody, Jane Doe, etc. It can work for you” type of thing? Cause I believe it could work, I’d just like to know why.[/quote]

Yeah, the author does go into his research in the actual book (not very in depth) and there are copies of his original newsletters floating around P2P sites where he discusses the scientific info (more info than what’s in the book).

I would love to see an actual university-driven study on his theories, and I thought he had mentioned that one was ongoing but I’m not sure where I saw that.

He even put the recipes section from the book on the WD site. I really dig some of these recipes

[quote]Epimetheus wrote:
Does the book explain the scientific basis at all for the diet? Or is it mostly a “This worked for Joe Nobody, Jane Doe, etc. It can work for you” type of thing? Cause I believe it could work, I’d just like to know why.[/quote]

There are vague allusions to science, but nothing beyound vague theories. There are no scientific references which is par for the course as diet books go I guess.

The follow up book (can’t remember the name, probably can be found on the Warrior Diet site linked above easily enough) supposedly had more in depth scientific information but I never read it.

The Warrior Diet book has alot of space devoted to historical diet and fasting information with somewhat questionable conclusions. Another sizable chunk is given to what I can only call romanticizing the Warrior Diet. Then the author explains why several other diets fail. Then there is the usual stuff: sample daily routine, suggested “warrior workout”, sample recipes, supplement advice, and a couple testamonials in the back.

I have to give him credit for some pretty useful supplement advice. I only hit upon the usefulness of things like green tea extract, stinging nettle, zma, and large doses of vitamin c, because of his book.

On the flip side, his recipes were unimpressive, and some were barely tolerable taste-wise. They all were written to make quite a hefty quantity. Even assuming you only ate one recipe for your daily food, it still would likely be more than could be comfortably consumed.

I had very mixed results from the Warrior Diet though I am tempted at times to try it again because of its fairly simple nature. I did find I lost fat on it, which was my goal at the time, and muscle seemed to stay about the same. Strength seemed to progress slowly, but not slower than I would have really expected I guess.

I have some problems with hydration and electrolyte balance which started with this diet back in the day. I have not been able to shake them though I have not kept my diet and lifestyle as dialed in as I could have.

I may give this diet another go though, we’ll see. In some ways it does remind me of the diet of certain monks who never eat more than two meals a day, and on many days will only eat one (if the day is a fast day).

Good luck if you try it.