T Nation

The Secret History of Money


#1

A long but interesting read.

http://www.celticsurf.net/freeworld/money/


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#2

That was interesting; I worked for the Rothschild?s in the 70’s


#3

http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Embassy/1154/flaherty.html


#4

An excellent series on the history of money- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlIhhYGujoQ

Or you can buy it here- http://www.themoneymasters.com/


#5

[quote]shookers wrote:
http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Embassy/1154/flaherty.html [/quote]

Patrick Carmack, who quotes McFadden in his Moneymasters series, has praises for the series from the likes of Milton Friedman. What would be great is to get Edward Flaherty and Patrick Carmack together for a debate.

Jim Rogers also says we should abolish the Federal Reserve, and he has been a guest professor of finance at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business.


#6

Thanks for the link, that’s interesting stuff. Do you know of any good books that cover this subject? I just finished my last pleasure read and could use some new material.


#7

[quote]timbofirstblood wrote:
Thanks for the link, that’s interesting stuff. Do you know of any good books that cover this subject? I just finished my last pleasure read and could use some new material.[/quote]

I really like ‘The Creature from Jekyll Island’, about the history of the Fed.

The hidden history, documented pretty thoroughly by the author, is amazing. For ex, Churchill did all he could to get the Germans to sink an American ship and get us in WWI. He considered all the deaths on the Lusitania justifiable and said so.

Great read.


#8

Hope these links work

Great documentary, book is prob. good too.

People need to learn this stuff, because the rights that you are so proud of are being stolen from you in secret.


#9

[quote]FormerlyTexasGuy wrote:
A long but interesting read.

http://www.celticsurf.net/freeworld/money/
[/quote]

That’s a nice read.

But what many fail to understand is that popular government is simply too dangerous to have. The unthinking masses of people will always vote themselves rewards using government as their agent. Such a powerful government will attract scum who enjoy using a club on others.

Wait…that’s what we have now…


#10

[quote]pittbulll wrote:
That was interesting; I worked for the Rothschild?s in the 70’s[/quote]

Directly or for one of their companies? They are an interesting family.

I’m not a conspiracy nut, and most issues about the money system covered in the article are taught in finance and economics classes at the university level but I would be interested to see some facts behind the assassinations etc. The coincidences are interesting for sure.


#11

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
FormerlyTexasGuy wrote:
A long but interesting read.

http://www.celticsurf.net/freeworld/money/

That’s a nice read.

But what many fail to understand is that popular government is simply too dangerous to have. The unthinking masses of people will always vote themselves rewards using government as their agent. Such a powerful government will attract scum who enjoy using a club on others.

Wait…that’s what we have now…

[/quote]

As long as gov’t taxes a general population to support basic infrastructure, I’m fine with it.

And citizens should be able to access the tax pool they support in the scenario of a natural disaster or heaven forbid an invading military damages a region.

The day to day welfare programs, gov’t housing etc need to go though.

But yes, power corrupts and money is largely misappropriated even if it does find it’s mark occasionally.


#12

[quote]timbofirstblood wrote:
Thanks for the link, that’s interesting stuff. Do you know of any good books that cover this subject? I just finished my last pleasure read and could use some new material.[/quote]

There are lots of books on the Federal Reserve. Just be careful of the source. There are some far fetched and largely unproven conspiracy theories out there, which are basically just fairytales with a possibility of truth to them, because they can’t be proven wrong either. Kind of like unicorns. You can’t prove they don’t exist.

College text books make great sources. Read them and fill in the blanks. IE, where does the money come from, where does it go etc etc. Somebody has to be in charge and whoever it is wants to keep it that way.

A few titles slightly off topic but interesting none the less I enjoyed are

  1. Rome Wasn’t Burnt in a Day by Joe Scarborough,

-a middle finger to the career politicians and power elites from an inside source. Joe was a member of congress. It’s about gov’t spending, pork barrel bills etc., funding which ultimately comes from the federal reserve and then is taxed on the american people. I bet you didn’t know you were being taxed for research on alternative salmon products or cricket research did you?

  1. Confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins I believe.
  • John was a high powered economist sent over seas to convince gov’ts in underdeveloped countries to allow american oil and infrastructure companies to set up operations. He uses faulty statisitics and forecasts on purpose, gets the contracts signed that are backed by the US and our allies militaries and then the bill to the countries for the built infrastructure is inflated grossly, forever indebting the country to the US as a sort of tax really though it looks like a business transaction.

Wars start over this. Civil wars, rebellions we step in to “control” etc. hence the Hitman title for the economist. Supposedly he has tried to publish his book for years but has been thwarted by publishers dropping it at the last second, death threats etc etc. He doesn’t list specific names but the story sounds a lot like that of Halliburton, J. Ray McDermott, Jacobs Engineering etc.

A very subjective (with a lack of real names and consequently facts listed) but interesting read.


#13

[quote]FormerlyTexasGuy wrote:
timbofirstblood wrote:
Thanks for the link, that’s interesting stuff. Do you know of any good books that cover this subject? I just finished my last pleasure read and could use some new material.

There are lots of books on the Federal Reserve. Just be careful of the source. There are some far fetched and largely unproven conspiracy theories out there, which are basically just fairytales with a possibility of truth to them, because they can’t be proven wrong either. Kind of like unicorns. You can’t prove they don’t exist.

College text books make great sources. Read them and fill in the blanks. IE, where does the money come from, where does it go etc etc. Somebody has to be in charge and whoever it is wants to keep it that way.

A few titles slightly off topic but interesting none the less I enjoyed are

  1. Rome Wasn’t Burnt in a Day by Joe Scarborough,

-a middle finger to the career politicians and power elites from an inside source. Joe was a member of congress. It’s about gov’t spending, pork barrel bills etc., funding which ultimately comes from the federal reserve and then is taxed on the american people. I bet you didn’t know you were being taxed for research on alternative salmon products or cricket research did you?

  1. Confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins I believe.
  • John was a high powered economist sent over seas to convince gov’ts in underdeveloped countries to allow american oil and infrastructure companies to set up operations. He uses faulty statisitics and forecasts on purpose, gets the contracts signed that are backed by the US and our allies militaries and then the bill to the countries for the built infrastructure is inflated grossly, forever indebting the country to the US as a sort of tax really though it looks like a business transaction.

Wars start over this. Civil wars, rebellions we step in to “control” etc. hence the Hitman title for the economist. Supposedly he has tried to publish his book for years but has been thwarted by publishers dropping it at the last second, death threats etc etc. He doesn’t list specific names but the story sounds a lot like that of Halliburton, J. Ray McDermott, Jacobs Engineering etc.

A very subjective (with a lack of real names and consequently facts listed) but interesting read.

[/quote]

It’s John Perkins … I burned through that book in a day … then I read it again the next day … VERY interesting read … two good recommendations …


#14

[quote]polo77j wrote:
FormerlyTexasGuy wrote:
timbofirstblood wrote:
Thanks for the link, that’s interesting stuff. Do you know of any good books that cover this subject? I just finished my last pleasure read and could use some new material.

There are lots of books on the Federal Reserve. Just be careful of the source. There are some far fetched and largely unproven conspiracy theories out there, which are basically just fairytales with a possibility of truth to them, because they can’t be proven wrong either. Kind of like unicorns. You can’t prove they don’t exist.

College text books make great sources. Read them and fill in the blanks. IE, where does the money come from, where does it go etc etc. Somebody has to be in charge and whoever it is wants to keep it that way.

A few titles slightly off topic but interesting none the less I enjoyed are

  1. Rome Wasn’t Burnt in a Day by Joe Scarborough,

-a middle finger to the career politicians and power elites from an inside source. Joe was a member of congress. It’s about gov’t spending, pork barrel bills etc., funding which ultimately comes from the federal reserve and then is taxed on the american people. I bet you didn’t know you were being taxed for research on alternative salmon products or cricket research did you?

  1. Confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins I believe.
  • John was a high powered economist sent over seas to convince gov’ts in underdeveloped countries to allow american oil and infrastructure companies to set up operations. He uses faulty statisitics and forecasts on purpose, gets the contracts signed that are backed by the US and our allies militaries and then the bill to the countries for the built infrastructure is inflated grossly, forever indebting the country to the US as a sort of tax really though it looks like a business transaction.

Wars start over this. Civil wars, rebellions we step in to “control” etc. hence the Hitman title for the economist. Supposedly he has tried to publish his book for years but has been thwarted by publishers dropping it at the last second, death threats etc etc. He doesn’t list specific names but the story sounds a lot like that of Halliburton, J. Ray McDermott, Jacobs Engineering etc.

A very subjective (with a lack of real names and consequently facts listed) but interesting read.

It’s John Perkins … I burned through that book in a day … then I read it again the next day … VERY interesting read … two good recommendations …[/quote]

You read Rome wasn’t burnt in a day as well?


#15

Old news to me. This is why the current economic mess does not worry me beyond day to day money operations of my business.

Its a process initiated by the banks for a simple reason. Their growth and taking over of other banks at bargain rates and to further expand their size.

Food for though, do you really feel that the people of the highest IQ’s, The most power in running entire countries and continents money supplies and economies had the rug pulled from under them? They were blindsided? If you believe that, you may be at the level of a person who fears God and is Still sold on religion.

And in the case you freed yourself from religions oppression of the mind, Congratulations! Your next step is to see banking for what it really is and understand it as a business and the rules and methods it follows to expand and create profits and debts.


#16

No, they were not blindsided, there are always smart people behind the scenes profiting from this.

The majority of bankers, 95%+ of them, are morons who were blindsided because yet again they mistake the bullshit ramping up as being real. How many times I have seen this happen. It will begin again in a few more years, some new bullshit people will invent, “this time it’s different”, another run up.

What annoys me are the 95% of the finance industry who are morons, who produce nothing.

And the 5% who are not, who are driving this and stealing from the system, who also produce nothing.

I don’t care that the system is set up that way. It needs to be changed. Banks should be there to facilitate the economy. Money should be there to facilitate transactions. These devices should not be there to funnel wealth towards the filth of society.

Note I am not communist in any way - I am all for wealth towards the productive, achieving, successful that DO SOMETHING. But this is not capital investment, this is financial scam.


#17

Banking has always been a scam. Did you know that the templar knight were the only ones allowed to charge interest about a thousand years ago? Interest was considered immoral and illegal for that reason. A form of usery.

The system works this way because this is the time for the banks to make money. Calling in debts, reducing money supply, and increasing government debt. Two of the three happened. Now via bailouts they are in the final phases of the plan. Increasing government debt to record levels. It all has a purpose and will come to pass in time.

BTW: War is also a huge moneymaker for central banks. Remember banks make money through having debts to be collected against.It’s a noose they have around the neck of the Government that will never be taken off.

Another way of saying the same thing but hiding the sinisterness and true intentions is saying they’re in the business of making loans.


#18

You are not telling me anything new.

Banking has not always been a scam there have been times and arrangements when things were fine.

gregus I really don’t think you understand this, or the history, very well. I am not going to enlighten you - do more research.


#19

Banking has always been a scam. It wasn’t a scam when the banks choose to be less of a scam, lol. Those times were all temporary until the arrangements were changed.

The few times when money was not a scam, is when it was controlled by an honest government who didnt have to replay debts to any one entity.

Fact is that even the history like truth, is seldom “truly” known.


#20

[quote]Gregus wrote:
Old news to me. This is why the current economic mess does not worry me beyond day to day money operations of my business.

Its a process initiated by the banks for a simple reason. Their growth and taking over of other banks at bargain rates and to further expand their size.

Food for though, do you really feel that the people of the highest IQ’s, The most power in running entire countries and continents money supplies and economies had the rug pulled from under them? They were blindsided? If you believe that, you may be at the level of a person who fears God and is Still sold on religion.

And in the case you freed yourself from religions oppression of the mind, Congratulations! Your next step is to see banking for what it really is and understand it as a business and the rules and methods it follows to expand and create profits and debts. [/quote]
This is old news to a lot of people you are right.

It’s taught in finance and economics classes, with the exception of assassination theories anyways.

It is new news to a lot of people though smarty pants.

The article did show banking, at least fractional banking, for what it is. That is the point.