T Nation

The Road To Former Fat Boy

So, I’ve been fairly fat my whole life. Lately, I’ve managed to develop Type Two Diabetes, so that’s a wake up call. I’ve got a plan, and I’m going to work in public. Maybe that’ll help me stay on track.

As an adult, I’ve been as high as 320 and as low as 270, and right now, post Thanksgiving, I’m sitting at 300.8

The first stage of the plan is the V - Diet, which I started today. The 28 days fits nicely in between Turkey Day and Christmas, and I’m busy with work in that period which is good.

I’ve signed up for The Cheater’s Diet test, which hopefully will be up and running right around the time I’m done transitioning off the V-Diet.

I tried the V-Diet using cheapass whey protein when Chris first posted it, and, shockingly, I failed after the first day.

What I’m hoping to accomplish here is to, yes, lose weight, but also get a good four week stretch where I get the exercise I need and eat right, to start building better habits than my fatass has had thus far.

I’m going to post everyday for the next 28 days, and after that, we’ll see.

V-Diet Goal: 280 pounds

More would be nice, but this is the goal, which should be doable.

Height: 6’1

Weight: 300.8

Waist (around the navel):53

First time admitting that in public. Egads.

As for long term goals. Well, weightwise, I don’t honestly know. I’d like to see a waist measurement in the thirties, at least, so whatever it might take to get there.

So, off we go…

Good goals man.

I think you’ll lose much more than 20 pounds though.

At your size I am not sure that I would start w the velocity diet. (and I am speaking from experience, because I was near where you are). Or at any rate, you will need to find something more for day to day once you have finished the velocity diet.

For me it took a real fundamental change in what I knew about nutrition. I also am a type II diabetic, and it made all the difference in the world to me to get my diet straightened out along these lines:

5 or six small meals a day made up of:

40% Low glycemic carbs
30% Lean protein
20% Healthy Fats

Not too long after I started this and a good solid exercise plan I was able to get off of all diabetes medication. In addition I lost a lot of fat, most weeks around 2 lbs a week. (if you lose more than that you have to be concerned that you are losing muscle as well)

What I am basically describing is “The Zone” – although it has a rep of being “hard” to follow, it is pretty easy to follow once you get the concept. The clearest description of it is in The OmegaRX Zone:

Dr. Sears also has a website which has a body fat calculator that helps you figure out your protein requirements, based on your weight, measurements, and activity level.

If you don’t like the idea of this, then I will also recommend that you take a look at The Metabolism Advantage, by Dr. Berardi who has written some fantastic articles for T-Nation. These are the nutrition principles I’m following now. And would be good for you as it includes a fitness routine.

GOOD LUCK!

The Velocity diet is the worst possible route to take for someone at your stage of development.

That wasn’t just written for no reason. It would be, possibly, the largest mistake you could make. There is NO WAY a person who has that much to lose should jump on a diet like that. You are guaranteed to fail and possibly go backwards in progress.

Berardi’s principles are the greatest. Learning how to eat healthfully and getting better and more diligent everyday will serve you much better than a diet, as long as you learn that slips along the way are part of the learning process.

You should buy Precision Nutrition, but here are some principles from his articles:

  • Eat 5-6 small meals a day

  • At each, eat a lean source of protein. (Eat 1g protein for every lb bodyweight per day)

  • At each, eat a vegetable (occasionally a fruit at breakfast)

  • Only eat carbohydrates other than vegetables after exercise, and those carbs should be whole grain.

  • Supplement with Fish Oil at every meal.

Do interval work instead of steady cardio, lift weights, and don’t get too aggressive too fast: proving to yourself that you can get to the gym twice a week and follow a diet 90% of the time will do more for your long-term weight loss than setting a goal to have a perfect diet and going to the gym everyday and failing the second day. Discipline is learned.

In fact, there is no advantage to eating perfectly 100% of the time over 90%, so have 4 cheat meals a week. And learn how much exercise works for you. Don’t get discouraged if you find that, realistically, you can’t get to the gym an hour everyday. First, because you shouldn’t need to, and second, because if it’s not working, a modified version will.

Thanks for the comments and the criticism.

I can’t say, definitively, that this is the right course. The no brainer aspect to it is a big part of the appeal, and something I’d be hard pressed to mimic with solid foods.

You don’t get as fat as I’ve gotten without some truly exceptional powers of self delusion. With this, I’d be hard pressed to kid myself that I’m following the diet when I’m not.

(Not that this has stopped people.)

And if I can do this, then it should be easier to keep on course with regular food by comparison.

Beyond that, it’s a challenge, and I’ve gotten to know myself well enough to know that’s when I work best.

Ultimately, it’s more important that I finish than it is that it neccessarily works.

Anyhow, I’m drinking my last shake of the day now. Metabolic Drive actually does taste pretty good, I have to admit.

I’m going to need to use more water for the shakes to cut the sweetness a bit. That maybe a problem, since as a bookmobile librarian I spend a lot of time away from the bathroom.

But I guess that’s why god made trees, eh?

No surprises, the first day was a breeze, even with Sunday dinner. Actually, more of a chore to drink them all.

Walked somewhere over two miles.

Gym time tomorrow.

[quote]JWJordan wrote:
Thanks for the comments and the criticism.

I can’t say, definitively, that this is the right course. The no brainer aspect to it is a big part of the appeal, and something I’d be hard pressed to mimic with solid foods.

You don’t get as fat as I’ve gotten without some truly exceptional powers of self delusion. With this, I’d be hard pressed to kid myself that I’m following the diet when I’m not.

(Not that this has stopped people.)

And if I can do this, then it should be easier to keep on course with regular food by comparison.

Beyond that, it’s a challenge, and I’ve gotten to know myself well enough to know that’s when I work best.

Ultimately, it’s more important that I finish than it is that it neccessarily works.

Anyhow, I’m drinking my last shake of the day now. Metabolic Drive actually does taste pretty good, I have to admit.

I’m going to need to use more water for the shakes to cut the sweetness a bit. That maybe a problem, since as a bookmobile librarian I spend a lot of time away from the bathroom.

But I guess that’s why god made trees, eh?

No surprises, the first day was a breeze, even with Sunday dinner. Actually, more of a chore to drink them all.

Walked somewhere over two miles.

Gym time tomorrow.[/quote]

Glad to see you listened. It isn’t like anyone here could possibly know what they are talking about, huh?

you need to learn proper eating habits…there is no expressway to leaness…you took years becoming a fatty…its gonna take a while to come off…

why go on the v-diet for 8 weeksthen stop and baloon back up??..a healthy lifestyle is a better option…learn why you are fat…and destroy that part of you…your turning the v-diet into a fad diet…

I wasn’t as heavy as you, but I also developed type 2 (bad) and started training again as a definite pitifully outta shape fatbody. I did have significant previous experience in the weight training game that helped a lot.

I don’t know everything, but I’m with the guys who are recommending against the VD at this time. Along those lines too steep a calorie reduction will actually work against you.

There are 2 main ingredients right now that will work hair raising miracles in your life.

  1. Eat 3000-3300 or so quality calories a day for a while give or take a little spread over 6 fairly evenly spaced meals.

  2. Find a simple weight training program designed for beginners and do it religiously. Some low impact cardio will help, but at this point, in my opinion properly practiced weight training will jumpstart your metabolism and lean you up for an easier addition of some cardio in a coupla few months.

I started training again in March with glucose levels consistently over 500, my blood pressure was 180 something over 110 and I was fat and sloppy with a large beer belly. I didn’t weigh myself so I honestly don’t know what I weighed.

By September I’d lost 10 inches off my belly, my blood pressure was 118 over 82 and my glucose was and is totally normal. Not to mention that I’m sure I’ve gained 15 pounds of muscle and am almost unrecognizable as the deplorable specimen of semi manhood I was less than a year ago.

I am now back on the quest I started 15 years ago (and lost track of) for all the size I can get and that is proceeding rather famously in light of what I thought would’ve been possible before I started.

Commitment and consistency are absolutely key. Half assed effort is a waste of time and even less enjoyable than being fat and slovenly. All this is of course one man’s experience and opinion so take it for what it’s worth.

I know where you’re coming from but don’t set your self up for failure, I was 39 and weighted 320# at 6’2", I tackled things one piece at a time, eliminating bad things from diet, And eating 6 healthy meals a day, listen to the guy’s on this site and you will be a success too.
I lost 120# in less than 2 yrs, I can do things I could never do before, but I kept balance in every thing I did, too extreme a program whether a diet or exercise program makes you more likely to fail in the beginning.
Be strong and smart about it, listen to what others have to say, learn from their mistakes and successes, and above all else don’t give up.
It’s been 4 yr’s since I changed my ways and those changes are just everyday habit now, it does get easier as time goes on.
Good Luck

I know where you’re coming from but don’t set your self up for failure, I was 39 and weighted 320# at 6’2", I tackled things one piece at a time, eliminating bad things from diet, And eating 6 healthy meals a day, listen to the guy’s on this site and you will be a success too.
I lost 120# in less than 2 yrs, I can do things I could never do before, but I kept balance in every thing I did, too extreme a program whether a diet or exercise program makes you more likely to fail in the beginning.
Be strong and smart about it, listen to what others have to say, learn from their mistakes and successes, and above all else don’t give up.
It’s been 4 yr’s since I changed my ways and those changes are just everyday habit now, it does get easier as time goes on.
Good Luck

[quote]Professor X wrote:
The Velocity diet is the worst possible route to take for someone at your stage of development.

That wasn’t just written for no reason. It would be, possibly, the largest mistake you could make. There is NO WAY a person who has that much to lose should jump on a diet like that. You are guaranteed to fail and possibly go backwards in progress.[/quote]

I agree, the current velocity madness sweeping this board is just that in most cases - madness. It seems everybody on the board is jumping on it now.

Yes, Dan John took the V-Diet. Also, remember that Dan John is 50 years old or whatever and been training and coaching for like 30 years or so. He would have the most insane amount of muscle memory there is to be able to pull of the V-Diet and not wind up as weak as a kitten.

Why can’t most of us who want to lose a little blubber simply follow the Meat, Leaves, Berries sortof diet. It’s naturally low carb, full of real vitamins/minerals and doesnt make you feel like a goddamn prisoner of war.

Furthermore, it is a much more sustainable way of life.

i don’t know what the velocity diet is, but if i had to guess what it was by the reponses to this thread i’d say it was a T-Nation production, which is an extreme diet which is very low in calories and obsessively anti-carb. not to mention, i’m guessing it’s also used as a front marketing tool for Biotest products.

that being said, i doubt it’s an ineffective diet, rather than just a diet that is too extreme for someone in your current state.

let me say that the biggest weapon you have for success regarding your goals is personal honesty. and if the velocity diet is as challenging and restrictive as i think it probably is, than there is no need for something of that calibre for an individual in your condition. you need to ask yourself: ‘do i really need to go this extreme to start off?’ why not ease into healthier lifestyle habits more gradually, as you are clearly coming from one extreme of overconsumption into another extreme of restriction.

getting to weigh over 300 pounds <in poor condition/high body fat>, takes years of extreme overeating and underactivity. i’m sure you’ve made many poor choices for years and years. and the poor choices you made were probably extremely poor choices. but now you’ve recognized the problem and have made a decision to take control of your health. that’s great. there is lots of good information to help you succeed.

but let’s put things in perspective. if your goal is to lose 20 pounds <i’m not sure you indicated the time frame for this loss, let’s say over the course of a few months>, you don’t need an extreme diet to accomplish this coming down from 300 pounds. you simply need improvements to your previous lifestyle choices, not some extreme diet.

think of it this way, if getting to 300 pounds required you to make every WRONG choice you could make over the long term, than losing 20 pounds will come along with simply making certain lifestyle changes which do not have to be as dramatic as the velocity diet.

for example: you can simply promise yourself that a certain share of your meals every day will be healthy. of course the word ‘healthy’ is up for debate among some people, but my understanding of that is natural foods. basically, it should include some fresh vegetables, some meats/fish or protein source that are reasonably unprocessed <i.e. subway sandwich chicken doesn’t count>, and some healthy natural carbohydrate source <low-carb activists are freaking out, now> which is satisfying and semi-slow
‘burning’.

make a big list of acceptable foods, maybe, and compose your meals of those acceptable foods. all kinds of healthy vegetables can be on the list, all sorts of unprocessed fresh meats and fish, healthy oils/fats <stay away from the trans fats, stick to unrefined/unprocessed vegetable oils and other natural fats like coconut oils and some butter, and naturally occuring animal fats and fish fats, nuts/seeds>, and healthy carbohydrates <all sorts of potatoes, oatmeal, unprocessed rice, different grains and their respective flours like wheat, barley, buckwheat, spelt, etc and legumes/beans, corn, peas, etc>

if you set yourself up for some extreme diet as the sudden change in direction in your life, you might be setting yourself up for something you might not be able to handle at this moment. it’s like going out for a couple of runs and then deciding to run a marathon with minimal training. it doesn’t make much sense.

you shouldn’t take my post as a suggestion that you can’t handle this diet, but simply that at this stage for you it is largely unecessary and you do not need to play games with yourself to prove to yourself that you can make a positive change in your health.

it’s no secret that you CAN make serious changes and progress towards your ultimate goals. this is absolutely true. we all know you can achieve your goals. you do not need to undergo severe hardship to prove this to yourself. this journey isn’t supposed to involve extreme suffering or deprivation. a few positive changes at the start while you continue learning healthy lifestyle habits is perfect, and over time you simply add tools to your personal toolbox/repertoire for personal success. everything useful you learn regarding training/diet/etc is just another tool.

lastly, i’m sure a bunch of anti-carb wimps are gonna come out dissing some of my advice, but those people almost always have personal issues about their body image and are obsessed with looking as lean as they possibly can all year round. don’t be one of those carb-o-phobes on your road to weight loss <although low carbing is an effective method for losing fat and weight in general, it’s not ever my recommendation>.

hope that all makes sense, good luck.

here’s an important tip:

don’t get down on yourself when you slip up. mistakes happen in all aspects of life, from school to relationships to family to work to LIFESTYLE.

so if you smoke a joint or eat some honey garlic chicken wings when watching the game don’t think you’ve made some huge error and start gorging another 5000 calories worth of deep fried foods. it’s part of the game.

and don’t become one of those people who can’t go out with your friends and/or family for a special occassion <i know, special occassions seem to happen every other day! use your judgement> and simply have some food on the menu <at another’s house or in a restaraunt> that doesn’t fit in PERFECTLY with your dietary standards. there’s nothing worse than being THAT obsessed.

good luck.

[quote]JWJordan wrote:
I can’t say, definitively, that [the velocity diet] is the right course. The no brainer aspect to it is a big part of the appeal, and something I’d be hard pressed to mimic with solid foods.

You don’t get as fat as I’ve gotten without some truly exceptional powers of self delusion. With this, I’d be hard pressed to kid myself that I’m following the diet when I’m not.[/quote]

I am going to be real frank with you – you aren’t using your brains and you are deluding yourself –

You need to learn how to eat properly. That is extremely important for someone in your shape w type II diabetes.

Maybe when you are 10 or 15lbs away from you weight goal, you can try the velocity diet.

BUT YOU NEED TO LEARN HOW TO EAT PROPERLY and GET YOUR NUTRITION IN ORDER.

People here are trying to make it easy for you – I will recommend again Dr. John Berardi’s “The Metabolism Advantage” – it will educate you as to how your body uses food, and how to eat to speed up your metabolism, build muscle and lose fat. It is based on science. It includes great recipes and a terrific fitness program. When you learn the principles of this and apply them, you will become more healthy, feel better. lose fat and put on muscle. The book is 16.00 and will take you two days to read.

Look – I have been where you are.

You are fat because you have made poor choices.

The velocity diet is just another poor choice for you.

It is time for you to start making smart choices – do what is right for your health and your body.

Best of luck.

[quote]e-loo wrote:
You need to learn how to eat properly. That is extremely important for someone in your shape w type II diabetes.
[/quote]

Print 50 copies of this and put them up all over your house, car and place of employment. The Velocity Diet is a specialty plan not a lifestyle which is what you need.

Also, try not to overcomplicate what you need to do. I’m becoming increasingly convinced that a lot of guys may be better off getting a plan together and staying away from the deluge of information on websites like this one for a while. I’m not telling you to do that my point is from where you sit the requirements are straightforward and simple.

Anything too much more involved than eat a satisfying amount of well balanced quality food and make your body work increasingly harder than it’s used is both unnecessary and counterproductive until you have been doing it long enough to see where you’re headed.

Death March To Oblivion, Day Two

Gym

Twenty minutes of Tae Bo, followed by super slow concentration curls on the swiss ball in the power rack.

I’m totally goona have that Brad Pitt in Fight Club body in, like, two weeks.

Or, possibly…

Walked two miles and some change.

Weights

Bench 45 * 10
135 * 5
155 * 3
205 * 3
195 * 3,3,3,3

Notes: The set with 205 was a grinder, so I’ll stick with 195 or 200 for the next workout or two.

Deadlift 135 * 3
185 * 2
225 * 1
315 * 1
295 * 1
275 * 1

Notes: Looking for a working weight here. 275 is probably it. 315 just barely went up.This is, as far as I know, my non lifting DL max, so no surprises there.

Cybex Press 45 * 5
80 * 3,3

Notes: Plate loading doodad, so that’s eighty per arm. I’m no sure what the ‘real’ weight is. I did 55 pound dumbells for ten last week, but I think for a second eighty pounds per is accurate.

Workout was truncated, seeing as my gym was closing. This is my biweekly long day at work, making it tricky to get everything in. Felt good.

Diet:

No problems, no surprises.

Blood sugar is actually the best it’s been since I started testing, right in the normal range.

Getting hungry right around the time my shakes are scheduled, which is nice. Hunger pangs haven’t been bad.

Thus far (which isn’t very far at all) the worst bit has been Flameout burps. Ah well.

I ended up drinking somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 ounces of fluids today, so I was pissing every hour to hour and a half. Since I’m on the road, this is annoying, but it was okay.

Other than that, no low carbs fog or weakness yet, and with the blood sugar being way down, I feel pretty good. We’ll see how tomorrow goes.

well, if so far you’re feeling good, that’s good news. good luck.

I expect frequent updates to this thread. I think we all do.

[quote]alownage wrote:
I expect frequent updates to this thread. I think we all do. [/quote]

I don’t. Realistically, I expect this to go much like Fat Tony’s thread from months ago. Someone who doesn’t listen, jumps in full force going from sedentary to fitness maniac is simply more likely to quit once the going gets tough. That is inevitable for someone with that much weight to lose who cuts their food intake and carbs that drastically from the start.

Your metabolism SLOWS DOWN over the course of a diet. It doesn’t speed up. If you start it at the bottom of your possible caloric intake, you have no where to go when that happens.

People who have dieted before understand this. People who have never stuck to a routine for very long don’t.

This has now been explained several times and this guy won’t listen. What is there to update?