T Nation

The Perfect Rep?

Hello CT,

I have a question again… :stuck_out_tongue:

In the past you said, you should accelerate maximal every rep you make.
In your log 1 you say : ( the first part is a question)( second CT’s answer)

Are practice sets still ideally done in 1-5 reps, as explosive as possible (turnaround)? If using your double progression method and doing a higher rep zone, still keep low reps but more sets on practice sets or match high reps but use fewer sets to not cause excessive fatigue? Also do you ever see a case where 1-3 practice sets are all one needs and then hit top set? Instead of the extended 3 rep ramps I mean. Thanks

  1. I believe that practice sets should copy the actual heavy sets as closely as possible. I use to recommend being very explosive and having a fast turnaround, but ever since I got back to Olympic lifting I have changed my point of view: you should attempt to copy the dynamics of your heavy lifts exactly. This means having the same form and rhythm. The same rhythm means having the same bar speed and accelerating at the same portion of the range of movement as with your heavy lifts. Basically if we somehow photo-shopped the weight in a video you shouldn’t be able to know which set is heavy and which one is light.

Does that change workouts like HPmass which relay on a ‘‘perfect’’ rep where you should accelerate as fast as possible as hard as possible?

Could you please explain that? I am unsure how to do a rep now ?

Thanks for reading, maybe you find the time to asnswer :slight_smile:

Link to the log page: http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/micro-pa-users/christian_thibaudeau_log_1_?id=5938555&pageNo=37

Both approaches work.

It’s like anything in training: I do not have ONE method. I have several tools that I used depending on the effect I want to create.

“The perfect rep” uses a principle called Compensatory Acceleration Training… basically you compensate the lack of weight by an increase in acceleration (Force = mass x acceleration). The principle is to make every repetition produce the higher level of force possible.

Doing all the reps the same as a heavy rep is based on a principle called “dynamic correspondance” which basically means that you become good at what you practice. Since a maximum effort will tend to be slower you need to develop the capacity to produce force more slowly if you want to be good at max efforts.

It’s a matter of what you want to improve and what are your own personal weaknesses.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Akidara wrote:
Hello CT,

I have a question again… :stuck_out_tongue:

In the past you said, you should accelerate maximal every rep you make.
In your log 1 you say : ( the first part is a question)( second CT’s answer)

Are practice sets still ideally done in 1-5 reps, as explosive as possible (turnaround)? If using your double progression method and doing a higher rep zone, still keep low reps but more sets on practice sets or match high reps but use fewer sets to not cause excessive fatigue? Also do you ever see a case where 1-3 practice sets are all one needs and then hit top set? Instead of the extended 3 rep ramps I mean. Thanks

  1. I believe that practice sets should copy the actual heavy sets as closely as possible. I use to recommend being very explosive and having a fast turnaround, but ever since I got back to Olympic lifting I have changed my point of view: you should attempt to copy the dynamics of your heavy lifts exactly. This means having the same form and rhythm. The same rhythm means having the same bar speed and accelerating at the same portion of the range of movement as with your heavy lifts. Basically if we somehow photo-shopped the weight in a video you shouldn’t be able to know which set is heavy and which one is light.

Does that change workouts like HPmass which relay on a ‘‘perfect’’ rep where you should accelerate as fast as possible as hard as possible?

Could you please explain that? I am unsure how to do a rep now ?

Thanks for reading, maybe you find the time to asnswer :slight_smile:

Link to the log page: http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/micro-pa-users/christian_thibaudeau_log_1_?id=5938555&pageNo=37[/quote]

Both approaches work.

It’s like anything in training: I do not have ONE method. I have several tools that I used depending on the effect I want to create.

“The perfect rep” uses a principle called Compensatory Acceleration Training… basically you compensate the lack of weight by an increase in acceleration (Force = mass x acceleration). The principle is to make every repetition produce the higher level of force possible.

Doing all the reps the same as a heavy rep is based on a principle called “dynamic correspondance” which basically means that you become good at what you practice. Since a maximum effort will tend to be slower you need to develop the capacity to produce force more slowly if you want to be good at max efforts.

It’s a matter of what you want to improve and what are your own personal weaknesses.[/quote]

Thank you CT, helped me much !!! A very good explanation. I understand it now and can use the principle behind it in my training !!