T Nation

The Perfect Rep and I,BB

Hi Christian,

In the Perfect Rep explanation under “Max Force reps,” you say there should be a component of maximum-force lowering and an SRP twitch turnaround. I am a little confused because I really never see these 2 components demonstrated by Kevin Nobert in the I, Bodybuilder videos (phases 1-3).

I only see the maximum-force lifting. Can you please tell me why we do not see these 2 components? It would be really helpful to see Kevin Nobert lift using these 2 components, especially since you recommend them. Should I continue trying to use the maximum-force lowering and SRP twitch turnaround?

[quote]bakerk wrote:
It would be really helpful to see Kevin Nobert lift using these 2 components, especially since you recommend them. Should I continue trying to use the maximum-force lowering and SRP twitch turnaround?[/quote]

I agree. I think the SRP was a critical component discussed in PR, especially regarding shoulder health, and I would like to see demonstrations of it on a variety of exercises. Actually, a short video dedicated to SRP demos would be great.

That said, I noticed there is a learning curve to applying it, for example on Bench Press, where I always used to touch my chest, but should actually be about five-inches off my chest. At first, because I had to relearn a new bottom position, my poundages suffered initially on the Bench Press, though not at all on other movements. But I imagine the concept applies to all the basic movements (certainly the various presses), so would like to see examples of SRP in-action.

Finally, I think that the Perfect Rep method alone (basic 3-rep ramping and SRP) constitutes an enormous improvement to traditional lifting, regardless of the routine employed. Add the max rep set if needed and most goals are covered.

Roy

Would greatly appreciate a brief video dedicated to SRP demos (even with different physique types) on the various movements–certainly all the pressing movements.

How many guys here adopted it? And what are you experiences with it?

I explained this many times earlier.

The perfect rep is what you stive to attain. It is composed of a relatively rapid but controlled eccentric, a fast turnaround and a max force concentric.

The IBB program is only the FIRST program utilizing the High Threshold Hypertrophy method and as such it is like grade 1 in the school system. Each program is not only a program, but rather a way of teaching each basic HTH principle one by one. Much like the school system, you don’t go to the next grade until you demonstrate that you have mastered the grade you are in right now.

The first step is to learn how to explode on the concentric. Some people naturally have that and can go on to step 2 which is the fast turnaround. Once that this is mastered you can go on to step 3 which is the performance of an actual perfect rep with a rapid bur controlled eccentric, a fast turnaround and a max force concentric.

Kevin, as a bodybuilder, trained ‘‘slowly’’ for some time. So he was basically in grade 1, learning how to explode.

If you have someone who is not good at exploding a weight and have him do a fast eccentric, it will just not work. The fast eccentric will actually inhibit, not potentiate performance.

Maybe you should make an article on the topic CT. It does look like an important point about I, Bodybuilder and the programs to fallow. And peoples are asking a lot about it.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

Kevin, as a bodybuilder, trained ‘‘slowly’’ for some time. So he was basically in grade 1, learning how to explode.

If you have someone who is not good at exploding a weight and have him do a fast eccentric, it will just not work.[/quote]

Thanks for the explanation. In the Perfect Rep article, the SRP appeared fundamental to the basic system, and you seemed quite mindful of safety issues, which made me question my old approach to pressing. You wrote:

“We always use SRP twitch turnarounds, or another type of specialized turnaround technique, on every lift.”

“Don’t force your arms lower than where they naturally stop with nothing but the force of gravity pulling them.”

So, even if a trainee has not mastered explosive concentrics, should we not still try to find that place where our arms naturally stop (say, on a bench press) if only for improved safety reasons, rather than always take the bar to the chest?

Finally, I’m relatively new here, and in reading as many of your articles and posts (trying to catch up to that vast volume!), I’m astonished by the amount of immediately applicable quality information you have volunteered on training and diet, that would otherwise cost trainees lots of money to obtain.

Best,

Roy.