T Nation

The Perfect Rep and Deadlifting

Many of you guys have asked me about how the concept of the perfect rep applies to the deadlift.

It doesn’t, at least not for the regular deadlift.

In my post ‘Overloading the stretch position’ I give 4 ways of maximizing tension at the turnaround point: the perfect rep, movements from a dead start, proper eccentrics and twitch reps.

The deadlift from the floor (or from pins) can only be done with the second category. So the way to maximize turnaround point tension is to start every deadlift repetition from a dead start, resetting properly on each rep.

The romanian deadlift is another story… but that is for another post!!!

Thank you CT for answering this Question with a whole new Thread!

CT, what do you suggest considering the SSC?

How do you determine in the Deadlift if someone should do:
Deadlift with 1 sec. on the floor (standard - deadlift)
or
Deadlift with Cluster reps (this must be really intens and just for advanced guys!?)

I’m really interested in the Squat and the RDL too!

Thanks again for your knowledge sharing with us and your precious time sharing with us!
Greetings
Marcel

Was wondering what types of exercises you consider the ‘perfect rep’ for? I find it had to do on isolation exercises such as flyes and curls but ‘easier’ on compound lifts like bench and rows.

I’ve noticed that when I focus on fast turn around speed that I shorten the ROM since if I got for maximal stretch in the muscle I have to slow down too much to lower the weight while stretching the muscle. I’m thinking this is the reason why I find fast turn arounds hard on isolation (especially DB Flyes) since I have to lower the weight slowly near the stretched position for fear that I’ll injure myself if try to contract too fast when at the bottom position.

Also this is probably more to do with me still trying to get the hang of it, but the perfect rep still involves a slow controlled eccentric? Because when I think about fast turn around I end up having a faster eccentric than I would otherwise have.

Thanks very much for your advice.

[quote]Br3nt0n wrote:
I’ve noticed that when I focus on fast turn around speed that I shorten the ROM since if I got for maximal stretch in the muscle I have to slow down too much to lower the weight while stretching the muscle. I’m thinking this is the reason why I find fast turn arounds hard on isolation (especially DB Flyes) since I have to lower the weight slowly near the stretched position for fear that I’ll injure myself if try to contract too fast when at the bottom position.
[/quote]

X2 on that, I was thinking the same thing, trying for the fast turn around with DB flyes makes me stall out at the bottom, normally I will lift a heavier wight with normal flyes and have no prob going slow and controlled. 1 count up, 2 count down.

Again this kind of theory is best explained by video logs…for the squat, would twitch reps during the first quarter of the movement followed by full ROM we advisable or should we just concentrated on turnaround a littel above parrell.

[quote]Br3nt0n wrote:
Was wondering what types of exercises you consider the ‘perfect rep’ for? I find it had to do on isolation exercises such as flyes and curls but ‘easier’ on compound lifts like bench and rows.

I’ve noticed that when I focus on fast turn around speed that I shorten the ROM since if I got for maximal stretch in the muscle I have to slow down too much to lower the weight while stretching the muscle. I’m thinking this is the reason why I find fast turn arounds hard on isolation (especially DB Flyes) since I have to lower the weight slowly near the stretched position for fear that I’ll injure myself if try to contract too fast when at the bottom position.

Also this is probably more to do with me still trying to get the hang of it, but the perfect rep still involves a slow controlled eccentric? Because when I think about fast turn around I end up having a faster eccentric than I would otherwise have.

Thanks very much for your advice.[/quote]

I use a fast turnaround on 90% of the work I do regular reps with. The other 10% is often more constant tension stuff and is done only with isolation exercises.

[quote]Br3nt0n wrote:
Also this is probably more to do with me still trying to get the hang of it, but the perfect rep still involves a slow controlled eccentric? Because when I think about fast turn around I end up having a faster eccentric than I would otherwise have.

Thanks very much for your advice.[/quote]

The eccentric isn’t supposed to be unduly slow. You are just supposed to be controlling the weight throughout the entire repetition.

[quote]OdinsMissingEye wrote:
Br3nt0n wrote:
Also this is probably more to do with me still trying to get the hang of it, but the perfect rep still involves a slow controlled eccentric? Because when I think about fast turn around I end up having a faster eccentric than I would otherwise have.

Thanks very much for your advice.

The eccentric isn’t supposed to be unduly slow. You are just supposed to be controlling the weight throughout the entire repetition.

[/quote]

Correct