T Nation

The Perfect Gym


#1

I'm doing a project for economics at school and have to make up a buisness plan. My idea was to start a training facility. You know, basically no machines. (are there any necissary, what about cables?)

So I want everyone to give me some input on what you would want to see in the perfect training center, and what would make you come into MY training center and not "Joe's Weight Pit" across the street.


#2

Something that would attract me is an 'alternative strength training' facility. Someplace where strongman style training is the norm.
Sandbags, hammers, kegs and tires kick your butt, and they are cheap. You only need the space.


#3

If this project is for an economics class, then wouldn't the purpose be to maximize profits, rather than just build an ideal gym for a tiny population?


#4

I have to be honest with you, if I was looking to start a gym purely to make money, it would have nothing but cardio machines in it. From a business model they are much more efficient as they take up less space per person that freeweights does. From a business sense, there are a lot more soccer moms and fat overweight bastards who think 30 minutes of walking while reading a magazine is the answer to fitness then people who actually want to get fit.

HOWEVER... I realize what you were asking and I have to say that if you felt there was a sufficient demand for more hardcore people, the perfect gym would probably be a lot like DeFranco's new center:

http://www.defrancostraining.com/ask_joe/archives/ask_joe_09-16-05.htm


#5

I would like to see everything from Dave Tate's site, especially a reverse hyper glute ham raise and wall to wall power racks.


#6

I was thinking about a business plan for a future gym not for any class but just for the hell of it (I am a business student). I feel like I could create a better gym than the one at which I work out. So maybe a couple of my tips might be useful for you. For example, maybe start a free group program weekly to attract older teens and teach them the basics of weightlifting in order to attract the new generation who is not very experienced in terms of weights. Also, in terms of equipment, think about what you want (what every T-man wants in a gym) as well as stuff that can appeal to the average middle age couple with money to waste in order to expand the target demographic. Think about where you live and pretend to know numbers since this is an economics class and may come in handy for judging membership pricing such as: the average income, age, and cost of existing gym memberships. And, there are too many old clients who do not know how to lift weights while not becoming injured so maybe a free educational class for them could be beneficial. People want to feel that the money that they pay for membership will do more than just letting them access a room of weights and machines. Surprising them with unique benefits may work so they feel that their money counts. This is just some of what immediately came to my head so hope this helps! Feel free to PM me if you would like any more of my ideas.


#7

Well, the market is already saturated with those, so it is assumed that there can't be any more aerobic gyms that are profitable.

Besides, this will at least be fun, and I can claim that through my advertising it will convince people that my way of gym is better or something like that.

Thanks for the help so far, kinda confirmed my ideas of having power racks, kegs, tires, kettlebells.

Would anyone think that a four lane 100m track would be a good idea? 2 lanes of rubber, 2 lanes of turf? Use it for sled drags maybe? Maybe a larger turf area to do agility stuff. Any other ideas in what would draw you to a place like here? Certain things in the locker rooms, on the stereo, or whatever?


#8

This dream facility sound an awful lot like, dare I say it, a Crossfit gym.

You would need an enormous complex to house a straight 100m running track. The cost of the facility would seriously erode your profits. I don't think the addition of a track would attract enough client to make it economically viable.