T Nation

The Next Big Thing in Training?

Most people who have been around this game for a few years remember how EAS and MM2K revolutionzed the supplement industry, and how Charles Poliquin changed the way most of us think about strength training. I’m wondering what the next “big things” in strength training will be? By “big thing” I mean this: What idea is a) just starting to be discussed (or is rarely discussed) and b) is so valuable/helpful that is c) will be part of our collective knowledge in a few years?

There are three ideas that I think will be mainstream (well, mainstream to hardcore types, anyway) in a few years, but that are rarely discussed today:

  1. The effect inflammatory foods have on preformance and injury prevention. I first started paying attention to the inflammatory effects of food after reading a chapter on it in Dr. Craig Leibenson’s book “Rehabilitation of the Spine.” Since avoiding almost all foods considered inflammatory, my old injuries have not flared up. Ineed, my last ART session was over 7 weeks ago!

  2. Acid-base balance in meals. I haven’t seen anyone besides John Berardi discuss this. I used to think that I didn’t need to eat my vegetables since I obtained nutrients from my multi-vitamin/mineral and my fiber from other sources. But after reading some articles on acidity and injury-prevention, I began taking a greens supplement (I use Barlean’s and Greens+) and eating more vegetables like spinach, my joints don’t hurt nearly as bad as they used to.

  3. Training the scapular region. Years ago articles in MM2K and T-Mag discussed the importance of training the rotator cuff. Although I trained my rotator cuff, I still suffered shoulder injuries and had other muscle imbalances. My ART provider (Tarek Adra) had me begin training my scapular region. Since then, old “knots” that kept me from sleeping at night have not re-formed.

Those are three ideas that I think have major implications for every serious athelete, but that are too uncommonly known. What are some ideas that you think are underdiscussed and that will have major implications for T-Mag readers?

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
3. Training the scapular region. Years ago articles in MM2K and T-Mag discussed the importance of training the rotator cuff. Although I trained my rotator cuff, I still suffered shoulder injuries and had other muscle imbalances. My ART provider (Tarek Adra) had me begin training my scapular region. Since then, old “knots” that kept me from sleeping at night have not re-formed.
[/quote]

Out of curiosity - What exactly was the scapular training question? I can think of scap push-ups off the top of my head, but not a heckuvalot more.

[quote]Kuz wrote:
Out of curiosity - What exactly was the scapular training question? I can think of scap push-ups off the top of my head, but not a heckuvalot more.[/quote]

There are also retractions. It takes a good deal of form to do properly. In a pull down grab hold of the bar and retract the blades. Start off with what you can pull down with to get a proper feel for the form.

The next big thing?

People actually exercising for their health.

There are a lot of people on here who post their weight training routines and pathetic diets, but you don’t see them talk about long-term effects of either on the body.

Anyone can throw a weight training routine together. I see hundreds of forum members do it on a daily basis. But actually following a total athletic program that encompasses strength, speed, agility, flexibility, etc. is RARE.

And eating huge protein meals or enormous amounts of calories to “bulk up” and completely forgetting about health (and eating adequate fruits and veggies and less processed foods) will be the next big thing.

[quote]Nate Dogg wrote:
The next big thing?

People actually exercising for their health.

There are a lot of people on here who post their weight training routines and pathetic diets, but you don’t see them talk about long-term effects of either on the body.

Anyone can throw a weight training routine together. I see hundreds of forum members do it on a daily basis. But actually following a total athletic program that encompasses strength, speed, agility, flexibility, etc. is RARE.

And eating huge protein meals or enormous amounts of calories to “bulk up” and completely forgetting about health (and eating adequate fruits and veggies and less processed foods) will be the next big thing.[/quote]

Huh. Aren’t you idealistic. That’d be nice. But I don’t see enough people ever being concerned with these things.

I completely agree on the acid/base balance of food intake. As a nutritionist (college-educated, not fly-by-night certified) and bodybuilder of 10 years I don’t come across a great deal of things that really open up my world, make me raise an eyebrow, and wonder how I missed that. Realizing the tremendous effect that our food combinations (or lack thereof) have on our body’s pH made me want to slap myself and dig deeper! And . . . eat more veggies!
When you think of the implications that this could have on not only atheltic performance, but overall health, prevention of sickness and disease . . . it’s really mindblowing!
BIG thanks to Berardi!
C-dog

Here’s one exercise that is very helpful. This is the best I can do without pics:

  1. You need a swiss ball and two light dumbbells (10 or 12 lb.).

  2. Get on your knees and rest your body on the ball. Your knees and body should be at about a 45-degree angle.

  3. Grab the dumbbells. They should be just in front of your head.

  4. With your bodyweight on the balls of your feet, propel/roll the ball forward.

  5. As your body along with the ball is moving forward, pull the dumbbells off the ground. Hold them for 1-3 seconds. Focus on pulling/supporting the dumbbells up by using the muscles below the scapula. You should feel like your shoulder blades are coming closer together, pinching the mucle and fat located above your spint. Your palms should be facing up at the end of the exercise.

That’s the best I can describe the exercise. I think they’re called “supermans” because at the end position, your arms are back in the superman-is-flying position.

Hopefully someone more talented at describing exercising than I, and who is familiar with the exercise will do a better job…

[quote]c-dog wrote:
I completely agree on the acid/base balance of food intake. As a nutritionist (college-educated, not fly-by-night certified) and bodybuilder of 10 years I don’t come across a great deal of things that really open up my world, make me raise an eyebrow, and wonder how I missed that. Realizing the tremendous effect that our food combinations (or lack thereof) have on our body’s pH made me want to slap myself and dig deeper! And . . . eat more veggies!
When you think of the implications that this could have on not only atheltic performance, but overall health, prevention of sickness and disease . . . it’s really mindblowing!
BIG thanks to Berardi!
C-dog[/quote]

I agree. Here is a link to a great article in an old Iron Man which addresses PH balance and imbalance and it’s effect on bodybuilders. It is from the Miracle Greens site.

www.miraclegreens.com/PDF'S/IRONMAN.pdf

D

High-protein beer

I wouldn’t be suprised if we see a new line of machines designed to mimic the effects of Dynamic Effort training.

West Side Lite…it might not be such a bad thing.