T Nation

The Need for Good Coaches

The “Who Do You Trust?” thread REALLY had me thinking about how many people are quite frankly misled into believing that the Internet provides all we need in order to reach our fitness Goals.

I want to throw out something that I feel strongly about and that hopefully we can discuss.

Despite all the “free” Information out there, good Coaches and Trainers are STILL needed

Simply because you have a yard full of bricks, nails and lumber doesn’t mean you can build a house; having Top Notch facilities and the highest Payroll in the NFL doesn’t automatically guarantee you championships; and because there is all kinds of information available “free” on the Internet doesn’t mean you have all you need to reach your fitness and/or Sports Specific Goals.

Information is one thing. Putting it all into a PROGRESSIVE and COMPREHENSIVE program that steadily and consistently has one reaching their Goals is another.

This is the value of the good Coach and/or Trainer. I venture to say that the average Internet dick-waver, who pounds his chest proclaiming “all we need is out there” is no more equipped to devise a Training Program than the average person.

Yeah, yeah, yeah…you’ve trained blah, blah years without a Coach or trainer and are 220lbs of 3%BF ripped Lovin’…

Congratulations…but you are the exception, NOT the rule…

Discuss?

Mufasa

I think coaches are definitely needed, especially when someone is starting out, for many reasons. Beginners don’t know correct form, don’t know what movements to use or how to piece them together, and don’t know whether they’re working hard or not.

As someone progresses, they get better at understanding what they need to do, but ego can also start to get in the way. They know how to work hard, but they can go so hard they don’t know when to let up.

A coach is valuable in that case because they can give that person a reality check and help them ease up in a way that won’t hinder further progress.

Good points, Doug!

Just as an aside…someone once said that a good NBA Coach was actually a good “Ego Manager!”

There probably is some validity to that!

Mufasa

I totally agree. You can pick up great info on the net and elsewhere, but still miss the bigger picture quite easily.

Long-term programming is difficult to plan. Its possible to do on your own, but way easier with an experienced, external guide.

I also think they can really help on technique, its hard to judge your form in a mirror while you are lifting a maximal load.

Thinking about that, I could really benefit from a proper a coach; I just need to find someone like a Thibaudeau or Cosgrove in my area. The problem is, I don’t think there is…

EDIT: I’m pretty sure there are few areas in the world with coaches of that level.

It never ceases to amaze me how many “experts” the Internet has help to create…

Mufasa

[quote]Mufasa wrote:
Just as an aside…someone once said that a good NBA Coach was actually a good “Ego Manager!”
[/quote]

I dont think this is just in the NBA… I think its of almost all sports.

Its like Prefontaine in without limits.

[quote]Mufasa wrote:
Good points, Doug!

Just as an aside…someone once said that a good NBA Coach was actually a good “Ego Manager!”

There probably is some validity to that!

Mufasa[/quote]

That’s why Phil Jackson is such a great coach, dealing with all the egos with the Bulls (MJ, Pippen, Rodman), and the Lakers (Shaq, Kobe). But like jillybop said, it’s across all sports. In basketball, you have 12-15 guys, in football, you have 50-60 egos to deal with, so I think it’s harder in football.

It’s like taking an online course. You can know a lot about math, but you need a teacher to help you understand the formulas and equations (or at least I would need a teacher to help me.)

Also, something out of control for most of us is the lack of good coaches in your specific area. Good coaches are spread all over, and in most cases, we can’t move to be closer to these coaches, let alone pay large sums of money for their training (although it is well worth it in most cases if you get the right coach.)

I think some form of standardized accreditation would either force shitty trainers out or educate them, and take care of the ‘need.’ Of course, this will never happen, but that would probably be the answer.

[quote]tmoney1 wrote:
In basketball, you have 12-15 guys, in football, you have 50-60 egos to deal with, so I think it’s harder in football.[/quote]

I disagree with this line of thinking. 12-15 guys = more coverage per player, more money per player, higher quality athletes. NBA players are highly visible, except for in advertisements and controversies football players are not.

More total players leads to less egocentric driven behavior (of course, there are divas regardless) because mentally you recognize that your contributions are mitigated by the size of teams and the amount of players on a field.

[quote]Dweezil wrote:
tmoney1 wrote:
In basketball, you have 12-15 guys, in football, you have 50-60 egos to deal with, so I think it’s harder in football.

I disagree with this line of thinking. 12-15 guys = more coverage per player, more money per player, higher quality athletes. NBA players are highly visible, except for in advertisements and controversies football players are not.

More total players leads to less egocentric driven behavior (of course, there are divas regardless) because mentally you recognize that your contributions are mitigated by the size of teams and the amount of players on a field.[/quote]

Yeah you’re right. I was thinking more of quantity, and a lot of guys don’t play, so you’re right dweezil. Good heads up. But nonetheless, more good quality coaches are needed.